Center for Biological Diversity

Yellowstone National Park Emblem Sticker
National Park Service

A coalition of tribal and conservation groups is asking a judge to restore federal protections for Greater Yellowstone grizzly bears, as it also asks the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), to restore federal protections on their own.

This largely nocturnal mouse lives primarily in heavily vegetated, shrub dominated riparian (streamside) habitats and immediately adjacent upland habitats along the foothills of southeastern Wyoming south to Colorado Springs along the eastern edge of the
USFWS

The Center for Biological Diversity and Rocky Mountain Wild, both conservation groups, filed a petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to continue protections of the Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse under the Endangered Species Act. 

The small mouse is considered threatened and occupies stream-side habitat in the front range of Wyoming and Colorado. 

National Digital Library of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Even as Yellowstone grizzly bear numbers drop, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it may announce their delisting from the Endangered Species List as early as January 1st.

In a letter to Western wildlife agencies, the agency agreed to allow the number of bears to decline from 714 down to 600 for hunting or livestock conflicts. Below that, they could only be killed if they were a danger to people. 

The Center for Biological Diversity attorney Andrea Santarsiere says it’s not time to let state’s take over grizzly management.