Cody

Cody Singer-Songwriter Kalyn Beasley On Wyoming Sounds

May 25, 2017
Justine May Photography

Kalyn Beasley recorded live on 5/25/17 during Wyoming Sounds.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

William F. Cody, also known as Buffalo Bill, died in Denver, Colorado on January 10, 1917.  One hundred years later, his name adorns a 300,000 square foot museum complex in Cody, Wyoming: The Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

That complex holds a Buffalo Bill Museum, but it also houses a research library and four other Museums, featuring Western Art, Plains Indians, guns, and the wildlife and wild places of the Yellowstone area. What else did the world famous showman leave behind?

Mike Wood

A blizzard in the Beartooth Mountains outside Cody, trapped snow plow drivers and even the tow truck that came to pull them out. An amazing rescue saved one plow truck driver who spent all night in the cab of his plow. He survived deadly cold and wind.

In Cody on Monday morning, just as temperatures rose above freezing for the first time in four days, blinding blowing snow trapped a big backhoe in a drift, and it had to be pulled out with another rig.

Sturgis Rally Impacts Cody

Aug 3, 2015
Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

The 75th Sturgis Rally may draw a million bikers to South Dakota the first week of August. Thousands ride through Cody, Wyoming. Why? They like to tour Yellowstone on the way.

Cody city streets are lined with motorcycles. The bikers are spending money in bars, restaurants, hotels, the museum complex and night rodeo. But there are other impacts too.

Phil Farman is the Cody area supervisor of the Wyoming Highway Patrol. He said there’s more traffic, and that leads to accidents.

Over the past few months, a set of proposed reading materials for students in Cody has led to more than 40 complaints from parents, the resignation of a school board trustee—and that board’s decision to form a group to address all the complaints before any resources are adopted.

But, on Monday, the group of teachers that recommended the contentious reading materials decided to pull back their recommendation until policies change.

Cody High School teacher Rick Stonehouse chairs the group—and says the process hasn’t been working well so far.

Abhi Sharma, Flickr Creative Commons

Hundreds of parents, students, and teachers showed up for a contentious school board meeting about reading curriculum in Cody Tuesday night. 

Cody teachers, administrators, and parents spent nearly three years selecting reading and language materials for the school district. They chose Houghton and Mifflin’s Journey curriculum books.

School Superintendent Ray Schulte says 8 or 9 people filed 40 complaints against the selection. Newly elected school board member Scott Weber had problems with some of the content.

“There’s junk science in there.”

Some parents in Cody are raising concerns about a reading curriculum that the local school board will vote to approve or deny next week.

The proposed resources are aligned to the Common Core State Standards and were suggested by a committee of educators in Park County School District 6 after years of discussion.

But critics don’t like the way some the reading materials address topics like war, slavery, global climate change and the treatment of indigenous people.

Wayne Thomas

With Valentine’s Day approaching, meet Ed and Carmela Conning from Cody. They got together in Long Island, New York back in the mid 70’s. Here’s the story of how they first met and their first date.

Wyoming Brothers Al And Pete Simpson

Sep 8, 2014
Wyoming Public Media

Wayne Thomas

Clarabelle Barsness lives in Powell. She remembers growing up on a farm in Cody and riding her horse to school—out of necessity.

Wyoming Stories: She'd Rather Ride A Horse

Jul 21, 2014
Wayne Thomas

Alice Fales lives in Cody, WY. She recalls fond memories of the role horses played in her youth and riding a horse to school.

Penny Preston

Yellowstone National Park lost two hundred cabins this spring. They were part of the park’s largest lodging complex. No, it’s not in the Old Faithful area, nor Mammoth. Penny Preston reports it’s in Canyon Village, where the park’s biggest hotel once stood.

PENNY PRESTON:  The Canyon Hotel was Yellowstone’s largest, from 1910, until 1960. It was created by Old Faithful Inn architect Robert Reamer. 

ROBERT REAMER:  “My parents used to like to go up there and have dinner.”

Harry Jackson Trust

The estate of acclaimed artist Harry Jackson is inviting art dealers and collectors from across the country to evaluate Jackson’s life work. It’s part of an ongoing effort to sell the collection that’s housed in Cody.

The Wyoming House of Representatives has given initial approval to a bill that sets up a state loan program and also helps fund the expansion of a Cody business. 

The bill allows loans to be used for large economic development projects.  It would also provides $24 million in state money for a company to expand its operation in Cody.  Officials say it will create over 100 jobs.  Cody Representative Sam Krone says these types of loans will help diversify Wyoming's economy.

The photo is courtesy of the Cody chamber of Commerce.

In the governor’s budget last week, one area that didn’t get a lot of attention is a proposal to increase funding to communities and counties by $175 million.  That would be a $40 million increase over his previous proposal.  40 percent of that money would go for infrastructure, such as roads, but the rest would go into operations.  If approved, it would come at a time when most local governments are dealing with less revenue.  Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck reports.

BOB BECK: Governor Matt Mead says he’s tried to make local government funding a priority since he took office.

Micah Schweizer

Ruth Michels lives in Cody, but she grew up in Laramie. Here, she remembers a childhood encounter with a black bear at Yellowstone National Park.

Micah Schweizer

Cody resident Martha Kinkade tells her daughter Becky the story of a wild horse only she could ride. Martha’s future husband, Harley, needed someone to ride the horse while he was gone during the summer, so Martha took the reins.

And in this story, Martha recounts moments from her school days.

Now that the government shutdown is over, Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks have re-opened, and local communities are hoping business will pick up again.

Scott Balyo with the Cody Country Chamber of Commerce says the area saw a 25 to 30 percent drop in business while the parks were closed.

“The first couple of days of the shutdown, we probably saw a slight increase in business, because people were hopeful that it would be short lived,” Balyo said. “So we had people who were willing to stay in the area and wait and see if the park would reopen.”

Historically, many museums have been neatly divided: by genre, by artist, by time period. Now curators are mixing up exhibits, so works are in conversation (or in contrast) with one another. A prime example is the Whitney Western Art Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, in Cody. Curator Mindy Besaw explains why she displays old and new works side by side.

Micah Schweizer

In this installment of Wyoming Stories, Stephanie Reutner interviews her neighbor Noel Richardson, both residents of Jelm. Richardson worked for the Forest Service in 1957, spraying trees against beetle kill around Cody and Yellowstone. He remembers a chef that cooked for the camp.

The chef, named Phonograph Jones, was in his 80s then and had also cooked for Buffalo Bill Cody and Prince Albert I on his trip to Wyoming 100 years ago. His great great grandson, Prince Albert II, is in Wyoming this week.

 

Micah Schweizer

Hailing from the mountains and plains of Northern Wyoming, Luke Bell’s music is shaped by his lineage of ranchers, tobacco farmers and ministers. This young singer-songwriter naturally brings us a blend of the old time blues/country sound and contemporary lyricism about poverty, loss, hardship, and redemption.

Prince Albert II of Monaco will be visiting Cody, Wyoming this week.

Thursday Marks the 100th Anniversary of Prince Albert I’s trip to Wyoming, during which he hunted and camped with Buffalo Bill Cody.

During his visit, the prince will be presenting the inaugural Camp Monaco prize to Dr. Arthur Middleton and Joe Riis to fund their study of the area’s elk migration. The grant is provided by the University of Wyoming’s Biodiversity Institute, the Prince Albert Foundation’s United States branch, and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

The fate of a major art collection hangs in the balance, as the estate of renowned Cody artist Harry Jackson looks for a benefactor. And unless a donor steps forward, Jackson’s life work will be piecemealed to pay the bills.

Wyoming Stories Community Recordings - Cody

Aug 15, 2013

Wyoming Public Media will be recording Cody’s Wyoming Stories on Thur. Aug. 29 and Fri. Aug. 30 at the University of Wyoming Outreach School in Cody - Park County Complex, 1501  Stampede Avenue.

For additional information and to reserve a recording time, please visit the Cody Wyoming Stories registration site .

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Photo courtesy Arthur Middleton

Since the 1990s, elk that migrate between Yellowstone National Park and Cody have been raising fewer calves. But the elk that stay in the foothills near Cody year round and don’t migrate have been doing very well. A new study looks at why that’s the case. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with the lead author on the report, Arthur Middleton. He says they spent years looking at the elk’s predators and habitat, and how those corresponded to elk pregnancies and overall wellbeing.

Ice climber rescued from South Fork Drainage

May 2, 2013

An ice climber from Powell, Wyoming is lucky to be alive after spending the night in the rugged South Fork Drainage several miles east of Cody. The Drainage is world renowned for its climbing opportunities and that is what drew second year climber, 54-year old Kenneth Richmond to the area Wednesday.

The Cody Chamber of Commerce is trying to raise 50 thousand dollars to be used to pay for snow plows to clear off the east entrance into Yellowstone National Park. 

Park officials have said they needed to delay the plowing due to federal budget cuts and that would likely mean delaying the opening of Yellowstone by two weeks.   Chamber Director Scott Balyo says it’s a serious issue for the Cody business community.

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