Devils Tower

Maggie Mullen

Throughout the month of June, the National Park Service asks visitors to refrain from climbing Devils Tower to respect American Indian ceremonies. However, the closure is voluntary and the number of climbers in June has been on a steady rise in recent years.

 

Credit Wikimedia Commons

Wyoming’s federal parks and monuments are expected to have more visitors than usual because of the National Park Service’s centennial and low gas prices. But officials in the small town of Sundance near Devil’s Tower National Monument say extra tourism dollars probably won’t help them with their budget shortfalls.

The number of visitors to Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone National Park are up 26 percent and 15 percent, respectively, for the month of May from last year. Devil’s Tower National Monument has seen a 30 percent jump in April visitors.

Devils Tower National Monument

Jun 9, 2016
National Park Service

The place known today as Devils Tower has been a fixture of Wyoming history since before the territory was granted statehood in 1890. Native Americans lived in the Black Hills area, including the Bear Lodge Mountains where the Tower is located. Different tribes had different names for the Tower; a common name for the geologic structure was Mato Tipila, meaning “Bear’s Lodge.” Today, over two dozen tribes claim affiliation with the site, considered sacred by many American Indians.

A 27 year veteran of the National Park Service has been selected to be the new Superintendent of Devils Tower National Monument. Tim Reid has spent the last six years working as the Chief Ranger at Yellowstone National Park. 

Reid is known as someone who provides a balance of resource protection, while providing an excellent visitor experience. He says the key is communication with stakeholders.

J Stephan Conn via Flickr

A small town in northeastern Wyoming is now on the market.

The town of Aladdin is home to 15 people, and sits on thirty acres near Devil’s Tower. Judy Brengle and her husband Rick bought the town in 1986.

She says being the mayor, store manager, chief of police, and cleaning person over the years has been tough, but rewarding.

‘There are a lot of people who don’t understand how much work it is to keep everything going. But it is a great place to live and a great place to raise kids and living in Wyoming is pretty wonderful.”