Doctor Taylor Haynes

GOP Disappointed In Haynes

Oct 23, 2014

The Wyoming Republican Party says it is disappointed that Taylor Haynes has decided to run for governor as a write-in candidate despite losing in the GOP primary election. State Party Chairman Tammy Hooper says that Haynes signed a unity pledge saying he would support all the Republican candidates in the general election.

Due to the summer, turnout may not be high during today’s primary election. That will mean that fewer people will decide some key races. 

One of the hotly contested races involves Governor Matt Mead and challengers Taylor Haynes and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill. University of Wyoming Political Scientist Jim King said the governor needs his supporters to vote.

“The concern I would think in the Mead camp right now would be making sure that people don’t just assume that everything is fine and find something else to do that day.”

Tuesday is Wyoming’s primary election and while it’s not that unusual for incumbent legislative candidates to have contested races, this year several top elected officials will also have to fend off challengers.

Three Republic candidates for Wyoming Governor disagreed over how much the state invests in fossil fuels as opposed to alternative fuels during a debate hosted by Wyoming PBS and broadcast by Wyoming Public Radio.   

Republican candidate Taylor Haynes says the state should not be investing money in the private sector and that the market will determine which kind of fuel the public will support. When it comes to alternative energy, Haynes say it works on a smaller scale. 

Doctor Taylor Haynes is one of three Republicans seeking the nomination for Governor. Haynes has worked as an engineer, a rancher, and a Urologist. He currently operates a company that deals with health care. He is also a former University of Wyoming Trustee. He tells Bob Beck that one issue that got him into the race is the battles the state is having with the federal government. He says he wants negotiations and not lawsuits.