University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming is looking to find more space for the WWAMI medical program. The program is run by the University of Washington and trains students from Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho to be doctors. 

Miles Bryan


Think about the word, “scribe.” What pops into your head? Probably something from a humanities class in college or a History Channel documentary, right?

Well, if you have visited a doctor lately you might be envisioning something more modern. The medical scribe industry has been booming in recent years, fuelled largely by hospitals around the country switching to electronic medical record systems.

Getting doctors to move to Wyoming has long been a big problem, but maybe just borrowing them could be an alternative. A new interstate compact law could make it easier for more out-of-state doctors to practice in Wyoming by fast tracking their licensing process. The state continues to wrestle with a severe shortage of physicians that’s left many rural communities without adequate health care. Representative Sue Wilson of Cheyenne sponsored the bill and was excited to see Wyoming be the first to pass the law.

UCD School of Medicine & Medical Science via Flickr Creative Commons

St. John’s Medical Center in Jackson is hiring several new surgeons and doctors to join the public hospital’s physician group.  It will be the first time the hospital has directly employed surgeons. 

St. John’s CEO Lou Hochheiser says the new hires are needed to meet demand in the area.

“A year and a half ago, we had 4 and a half surgeons in this community,” Hochheiser said. “We have lost two and a half of those surgeons, leaving us with two. Therefore, it was the hospital’s responsibility to make sure that gap was filled.”

Bob Beck / Wyoming Public Radio

The Wyoming Board of Medicine says a record number of physicians received licenses to practice in Wyoming last year.  The Board of Medicine’s Kevin Bohnenblust says 35 more physicians were licensed when compared to 2012 numbers, and overall they saw 15-percent more doctors compared to 2009.  He says that’s due to a new, simplified licensing process and the fact that many doctors include non-traditional approaches, such as telemedicine, in their practices.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov caught up with Governor Matt Mead to check in about some big changes in the state in the coming months. Her first question was about the Environmental Protection Agency’s report on contaminated water in Pavillion and the state’s takeover of the study.

Though the entities involved in the study have previously expressed skepticism over the EPA’s findings, Governor Mead says he has no doubts that the state’s study will be unbiased.