driving

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Uber has been operating in the state for just over a month now. Their launch followed Governor Matt Mead’s signing of a bill to legally authorize ride-sharing companies in Wyoming. However, while some consumers have been taking advantage of the service, others are less excited.

Branden French was one of the very first drivers to start working for Uber in March. Right now, he’s a university student in Laramie. He said Mead signed the bill on a Friday, and he was on the road that weekend.

City of Cheyenne

The Cheyenne Metropolitan Planning Organization is emphasizing traffic circle safety in the city’s eleven roundabouts as part of a new safety campaign.

Tom Mason, director of the Metropolitan Planning Organization, said Cheyenne and many other cities are moving towards traffic circles since they are safer than traditional 90-degree intersections.

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park officials will close most of the park’s roads Monday to prepare for winter. The East, South, and West gates will also remain closed for the remainder of the season.

The North and Northeast entrances and the road that connects them will remain open. Park spokeswoman Morgan Warthin says that people who live in the area use the road throughout the season, as do visitors hoping to see wildlife in the Lamar valley. She adds that travelers should visit the park’s website to stay informed about weather-related closures.

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A recent study shows Wyoming parents can expect the fourth highest increase in auto insurance rates nationwide when they add a teen driver, but Wyoming drivers pay little for auto insurance overall.

The study by InsuranceQuotes.com, an online marketplace for purchasing car insurance, found that when a teen starts to drive, a Wyoming family’s auto insurance rate more than doubles, with an increase of 105.8 percent.

Insurance Information Institute spokesman Michael Barry said factors unique to Wyoming contribute to why it’s so expensive to insure teen drivers.

For the first time in decades, Americans are driving less—and Wyomingites are no exception. Driving in the state is down 12 percent from its peak in 2003, according to a new report from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group.

At more than 16,000 miles per person per year, Wyoming drivers still log more time on the road than residents of any other state, but the cutback in driving is helping close the gap, according to Phineas Baxandall, who did the analysis.