elderly

Wyoming Retirement System

Lots of people look forward to retirement, but the majority has not set aside enough money to retire. Much of that has to do with unexpected costs. 

University of Wyoming Extension Specialist Cole Ehmke has looked at a lot of studies surrounding personal financial management. He said some of the numbers are alarming. 

Maggie Mullen

Like many federal programs across the country, Meals on Wheels is facing possible cuts as part of President Donald Trump’s proposed budget. The program’s Wyoming partners have already experienced cuts at the state level due to the energy downturn, and it’s hard to know when the federal budget will be decided on. In the meantime, many homebound seniors and Wyomingites with disabilities that depend on the program are concerned about the future of their care.

Wyoming Center On Aging

An upcoming Laramie workshop will work to empower people dealing with chronic disease. The Wyoming Center on Aging (WyCOA) at the University of Wyoming adopted Stanford University’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program and called the program “Healthy U.”

Wyoming will be the fiftieth state to offer the program.

Bob Beck

In Laramie, the Eppson Center for Seniors is looking at how it should operate in the future. Lynne Simpson is overseeing that effort.  She says the kinds of discussion surrounding independent living that’s taking place in Laramie should occur throughout Wyoming.  

Miles Bryan

If you receive hospice end of life care in the United States it probably comes to you. Nationally about 60% of hospice care is administered at the patient’s home, or in a nursing home. Only about 7% receive care in a facility designed specifically for hospice patients. But in Wyoming, that number is closer to 30%--and its growing.

Global warming impacts the elderly

Sep 28, 2012

When you think of climate change, you might think of forest fires and heat waves, you might not think of respiratory disease, cardiac arrest, or viruses. As former Open Spaces Co-Host and the current health reporter for Rhode Island Public Radio Kristin Espeland Gourlay discovers, doctors and scientists are beginning to focus attention on the most vulnerable to these ailments: the elderly.