fish

National Park Service

Yellowstone biologists are winning the war against invasive Lake Trout, and bringing back native Yellowstone Cutthroat.

Yellowstone Lake is a cold place. If you’re out on the lake even in the middle of the summer, you’ll need a jacket. So, when we went out in a boat with Yellowstone’s leader of the Cutthroat Trout restoration project, it was chilly.

Yellowstone Lake is the largest fresh water lake above 7000 feet in north America. It is also very deep, and cold. That is why non-native Lake Trout have thrived here. They evolved in the Great Lakes. 

Green River Recreation Department

It’s been a decade and a half of drought for Western states, many of which depend on the Colorado River for water. That includes Wyoming where the main branch of the Colorado—the Green River—originates in the Wind River Range.

The Upper Colorado River Basin states have decided to try a water conservation program long used in the Lower Basin states that pays water users to let their excess water flow back into the river.

U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service

The Saratoga National Fish Hatchery celebrates its 100th anniversary this weekend.

It is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and attracts around 3-thousand visitors a year. It raises both native and non-native trout species for stocking lakes and rivers and works with conservationists to protect endangered Wyoming Toads.

Ryan Moehring is a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He says the hatchery will be hosting some special events in honor of the centennial.

Joe Skorupski

In an effort to build-up kokanee salmon populations in the state, Wyoming Game and Fish has begun collecting eggs in Flaming Gorge Reservoir.

Kokanee were first introduced into the gorge in the 1980s. Fisheries biologist Joe Skorupski says they were intended as food for trophy lake trout, but they're also good as food for people.

“Kokanee are a pretty desirable species for anglers,” he says. “They’re fun to catch and they taste really good.”

At this time of year, the land-locked, fresh water salmon are in the late stages of their run and at their most fertile. 

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is studying invasive fish called burbot, to figure out what parts of the Green River they occupy at different times of year.

The department’s Darren Rhea says that could help them come up with ways to reduce the burbot population. He says burbot are problematic for the river’s ecosystem.

“They are almost exclusively a pisciverous fish, so they prey almost exclusively on other fish,” Rhea said.

Representative Rosie Berger of Big Horn is sponsoring a bill that would allow water rights holders to temporarily change their use to benefit certain fisheries areas in the state.

Under current law, if a private citizen wants to restore in-stream-flow on his property, he must permanently donate his water rights to the state. Also, holders can lose their water rights if they don’t use them to their full extent. Berger’s bill would allow holders to retain water rights, even if they stop irrigating part-way through the summer… thus leaving more water for the fish.