fossils

News
10:30 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Scientists To Excavate Wyoming Cave Full Of Prehistoric Fossils

Giant Mammoth. Morrill Hall, University of Nebraska in Lincoln.
Credit B. Smith via Flickr Creative Commons

For the first time in decades, scientists are excavating fossils from an 80-foot-deep cave in North Central Wyoming.

The cave is called “Natural Trap Cave,” because it’s become the final resting place for countless animals in past centuries—including many now-extinct ones like mammoths, short-faced bears, and American lions.

Julie Meachen is a paleontologist at Des Moines University. She’ll rappel into the cave with a team of 15 others.

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Open Spaces
3:33 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

New fossil prep lab at the geology museum offers opportunity for students and community

University of Wyoming student Mitchell Lukens works in the new preparation lab in the Geology museum.

The geology museum at the University of Wyoming recently re-opened after a long remodel. One of the features unveiled is a new fossil preparation lab. This lab offers U-W students, museum visitors, and the community a variety of opportunities to learn more about fossil prep. Wyoming Public Radio’s Chelsea Biondolillo has more.

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Open Spaces
5:31 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Fossils on private lands find collectors and critics

JP Cavigelli looks for small fossils on a private ranch, near Lusk.
Irina Zhorov

Wyoming was once wet, balmy, and full of creatures like dinosaurs. Today, their fossils are slowly weathering out of the ground. If the bones happen to be on public land, researchers are granted permits to dig for them and the fossils have to end up in a public repository. But on private land, anyone can dig and they can do whatever they want with the specimens. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that commercial, or independent collectors, are sometimes eyed warily.

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News
10:43 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Fossils on private lands find collectors and critics

JP Cavigelli searches for fossils on a ranch near Lusk, WY.
Credit Irina Zhorov

HOST: Wyoming was once wet, balmy, and full of creatures like dinosaurs. Today, their fossils are slowly weathering out of the ground. If the bones happen to be on public land, researchers are granted permits to dig for them and the fossils have to end up in a public repository. But on private land, anyone can dig and they can do whatever they want with the specimens. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that commercial, or independent collectors, are sometimes eyed warily.

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