governor mead

Due to the summer, turnout may not be high during today’s primary election. That will mean that fewer people will decide some key races. 

One of the hotly contested races involves Governor Matt Mead and challengers Taylor Haynes and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill. University of Wyoming Political Scientist Jim King said the governor needs his supporters to vote.

“The concern I would think in the Mead camp right now would be making sure that people don’t just assume that everything is fine and find something else to do that day.”

The Eastern Shoshone tribal liaison has stepped down from her position, saying the governor and legislature were disrespectful to her, both as a woman and tribal member. But the Governor's office says she wasn't fulfilling her responsibility to mediate between the tribes and the state. 

Tensions have been mounting between the governor’s office and the Wind River Indian tribes for months. The Environmental Protection Agency recently ruled that the city of Riverton falls within reservation boundaries, setting the state and tribes at odds.

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead says the plan by the Environmental Protection Agency to require carbon pollution limits on new power plants is too limited and hurts the state’s economy.  During a news conference, Mead was critical of the E-P-A for not following Wyoming’s lead and look at ways to develop clean coal technology.

“I think everybody should have an interest in how we do it in the most environmentally friendly way possible, but when you set a standard that nobody has done yet…to me it looks like you are just shutting off coal completely.”

State begins to develop a water strategy

Nov 4, 2013

Calling water a valuable Wyoming resource, Governor Matt Mead’s office is in the process of developing a long term water strategy similar to the recently developed energy policy.   Beginning this week a series of meetings will take place across the state that will gather feedback from citizens on how the state should proceed. 

Mead policy analyst Nephi  Cole  said they expect to hear about a number of issues.             

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead says he is still weighing the attributes of the three finalists for the state’s new Education Director.  The Director would run the State Department of Education.  

Mead has interviewed all three, but says he wants more time to consider them.

As testing continues on whether fracking contaminated groundwater in the Pavillion area, Governor Matt Mead and state officials will host a meeting next week on a new way to get fresh water to citizens. 

Mead says they are considering a cistern system where each resident would have a water tank to hold their water supply.  Water for the tanks would be trucked from Riverton or Lander.  One issue is how to pay for it.  Governor Mead says the Environmental Protection Agency is not set up to help pay for such a project and getting the gas company Encana to pay is a bit tricky.

Wind energy boom appears to have slowed

May 14, 2012

    Wyoming Governor Matt Mead admits that interest in wind energy has cooled off for a bit,  but he hopes things will turn around soon. 

One issue is the failure of Congress to extend the wind energy tax credit, but the governor is also concerned about Wyoming’s wind tax policy.  He says he hoped the legislature would approve a tax on wind generation, but lawmakers cannot reach an agreement on that legislation.

Wyoming is still battling roadless rule

May 14, 2012

 Governor Matt Mead says he is continuing to pursue legal action over the federal roadless rule as he tries to work out a compromise in Wyoming.  Mead says the lawsuit is trying to delay making hundreds of acres off limits to development, while state officials work with the forest service to determine what should actually be off limits.

The state of Wyoming is asking a federal appeals court to reconsider its recent decision that the state
can't sue the federal government over how many snowmobiles are
allowed in Yellowstone National Park.
Wyoming had argued that limiting snowmobiles to 318 a day was
arbitrary and would hurt tourism and tax revenue. A panel of the
10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last month rejected the state's
arguments, saying it failed to show the rule would harm the state
economically.
 Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead on Wednesday noted that Yellowstone is

    Governor Matt Mead says low natural gas prices and a declining revenue forecast was behind his thinking in denying pay hikes for state, University of Wyoming and Community College employees this year.  Mead was concerned about committing to a long term spending item and thought that it was wiser for the state to focus on one time spending.