Hiking

Willow Belden

Former Wyoming Public Radio reporter and host Willow Belden left her job this spring to hike the Colorado Trail. That’s a 500-mile path through the Rockies, from Denver to Durango. She did the journey alone.

The Colorado Trail crosses eight mountain ranges, and climbs nearly three times the height of Mount Everest. It’s mostly above 10,000 feet, so the air is thin, there’s significant danger of lightning strikes, and it often freezes at night. About 400 people attempt the trail each year, but only 150 make it to Durango.

A pair of hikers missing since last week in the Bighorn National Forest were found Wednesday—and have been released from the hospital in stable condition.

The couple didn’t return from their trip on time because one of the hikers had injured her leg.

Many search and rescue operations occur in Wyoming wilderness each year for hikers who get lost or injured.

Marc Koeplin

The Continental Divide Trail is a hiking path that runs from Canada to Mexico, along the great divide. It’s more than 3,000 miles long, and only a handful of people hike the whole thing in a single year. Marc Koeplin of Cheyenne is one of them.

He and his hiking partner finished the trail a few weeks ago, and joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden to talk about the trip. He says his first long-distance hike was the Appelachian Trail, which he did 12 years ago.

Missing hiker's body found in Wind River Range

Jul 4, 2013

The body of the hiker who has been missing in the Wind River Range has been found. James 'Randy' Udall did not return from a hiking trip to the Wind River Range and search and rescue crews worked for days before locating him in a remote area of the Range. It appears he died of natural causes, though an autopsy is forthcoming. In a statement, his family said Udall “left this earth doing what he loved most, hiking in his most favorite mountain range in the world.”

Wyoming Wilderness Association – Sheridan

May 31, 2012
Wyoming Wilderness Association

The Wyoming Wilderness Association (WWA) is a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization first created in 1979 by a group of wilderness advocates and outdoors people who envisioned the Wyoming Wilderness Act.  Headquartered in Sheridan, WWA has offices in Jackson, Dubois and Lander as well.

In 1984, the passage of the Wyoming Wilderness Act brought to all Americans the permanent protection of an additional 1.1 million acres of ecologically diverse, wild country.