Jackson landslide

Rebecca Huntington

On Tuesday, Jackson voters will be deciding whether to use sales tax dollars to pay for fixing a landslide that's looming over the town's main road. In 2014, the creeping slide accelerated triggering an emergency evacuation of nearby homes and businesses, disrupting water and sewer and destroying a Walgreens parking lot. Walgreens has abandoned the site and the town has spent more than one million dollars to restore services and slow the slide.

Rebecca Huntington

Jackson and Teton County officials have decided to let voters decide whether to use 6 million dollars raised from a sales tax to fix a slow moving land slide. 

The slide began about 2 years ago and has cut off access to a neighborhood and a Walgreens. It also threatened underground water pipes and split a home in two.

Jackson Mayor Sara Flitner says if the slide is not completely fixed, natural events like a wet day or an earthquake could put residents in danger.

Lori Iverson/USFWS via Flickr Creative Commons

A private consultant presented preliminary options for a more permanent fix to a creeping landslide in Jackson at a Town Council meeting yesterday. 

The Town of Jackson has hired Oregon-based consultant George Machan to come up with options for stopping the slow-moving landslide on Jackson's East Gros Ventre Butte. Although the earth movement has slowed to less than half an inch per week, town officials want to reinforce the slope to prevent future problems.

The options have price tags ranging from eight million to thirty million dollars. 

Rebecca Huntington

A slow-moving landslide has displaced homes and businesses in Jackson, and the town has been working to deal with the problem for weeks. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with reporter Rebecca Huntington, who’s been following the situation closely. She says from what geologists have said, the cause of the landslide seems to be a combination of natural and human-induced factors.

Rebecca Huntington

A creeping landslide on Jackson's East Gros Ventre Butte, that has forced the evacuation of homes and businesses, appears to be slowing down.

Charlotte Reynolds, an information office for the Budge Drive Slide, says the slower movement, combined with favorable weather, could make it possible for some residents to return home soon.

Rebecca Huntington

A slow-moving landslide in Jackson has started accelerating, blocking off the area's only access road and undermining options for stabilization.

Crews stopped work Thursday on an emergency buttress designed to slow down the slide. Officials decided it was no longer safe to work beneath a cut slope that kept releasing gravel slides, and pulled workers off the job. The only access road to the hillside has become impassable.

The Town has hired landslide expert George Machan, who gave an update today.

An evacuation order is being downgraded to an advisory for some homes and apartments under threat from a slow-moving landslide in Jackson. An evacuation order will remain in effect for five residences within a high-risk zone where geologists are seeing slope movement of about an inch a day.

Even though residents in lower-risk areas are allowed to move back, Acting Police Chief Cole Nethercott says he's not encouraging them to do so.