Wyoming is a largely rural state with limited diversity. But as the population grows and the state attracts all sorts of newcomers. Wyoming is learning to accommodate the changing population. One of the areas where the state is making headway is interpretation services in its courts. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports.

A geologist and landslide consultant says the chance of a sudden, catastrophic slope failure on East Gros Ventre Butte in Jackson is only about 5 percent. As a result, town emergency services have downgraded their evacuation order, allowing most businesses in the Hillside building to reopen this morning. Some businesses and many residences remain under an evacuation order.

At a community meeting last night, Acting Chief of Police Cole Nethercott asked residents not to take unnecessary risks by entering the evacuation area on their own.

Wyoming Geological Survey

Update 04/09 20:30 

City officials have now ordered an evacuation of the area. For the most up-to-date information, visit the city's website.

Original post:

Jackson emergency services have issued an evacuation advisory for an area in the northwest part of town because of concerns over landslides

Harold Turner grew up on the Triangle X Ranch in Jackson, Wyoming. Here, he recounts how some childhood mischief taught him a valuable lesson.

Rebecca Huntington

With the deadline looming to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, healthcare-dot-gov navigators are seeing a surge in people seeking help. Wyoming Public Radio's Rebecca Huntington has more.

"Thanks for your patience, you'll have our undivided attention shortly. Your access to quality, affordable coverage is just a few minutes away."

Josh and Susan Anderson—Evanston natives who met only after they were both going to college in Utah—work for the Uinta County school district. In this story, the couple talks about how they arrived at their vocations.

Both of the Andersons’ children were born in Jackson—the closest hospital to their home at the time, and more than a two hour drive away. Naturally, this left the couple with some wild stories about childbirth on the frontier.

A new report by the American Public Transportation Program shows that public transit use across the nation is on the rise, including in Wyoming.  Jackson racked up its largest ridership ever this winter. Ridership on Cheyenne buses has increased as well. Joe Dougherty is director of the Cheyenne Transit Program. He says ridership has increased about 10 percent a year since 2006 to a high of almost 300,000 people in 2013.  Dougherty says seniors and those with disabilities use the system regularly, and so do others.

Bill and Martha Saunders are long-time Jackson residents. The couple was instrumental in founding the Jackson Hole Ski Club, and their family was also central in Wyoming's rodeo scene. Bill and Martha share memories of their rodeo experiences, including Martha's tour with the Singing Cowboy, Gene Autry.

Sixteen sled dog teams are racing 350 miles this week across western Wyoming and neighboring states. After a rest day Monday, teams will resume racing Tuesday with a 50-mile leg from Lander. 

Governor Matt Mead and other elected officials made the case during a Jackson forum Wednesday that Wyoming's future depends on energy. They said that tapping state's energy resources, from coal to natural gas, is what pays the bills when it comes to building schools and other vital infrastructure.

But the governor said that doesn't mean producing energy should come at the cost of the environment. And that impressed Paul Hansen, who moderated
the forum.

Jennifer Tennican

Dail Barbour was twenty-four-years-old when she moved to Jackson Hole. She worked at the Wort Hotel, a historic inn in the heart of the city, where she was issued a remarkable uniform. 

Dail Barbour arrived in Wyoming the summer she graduated from high school, 1964. She and a few friends bicycled across the country. They spent a week in Yellowstone and Barbour swore she would return. Six years later, she moved to Teton County permanently, settling for some time in Wilson where she spent many days and nights at the legendary Stagecoach Bar.

Micah Schweizer

Bert Raynes, a distinguished naturalist in Jackson Hole, tells the story of how he became interested in wildlife. Bert has published many books about nature, and he continues to write a column titled “Far Afield” in the Jackson Hole News and Guide newspaper. Fellow Jackson resident Rebecca Huntington interviews him.

Wyoming Stories Community Recordings in Jackson

Dec 23, 2013
Jen Faulkner

Jackson Listeners... Wyoming Public Media would like to record your Wyoming Story at the Teton County Library on Friday, January 3 rd.

To reserve a recording time, visit the registration siteJackson Wyoming Stories Registration .

Rebecca Huntington

We've all heard stories about businesses that start in a garage or on the back of a cocktail napkin. But it takes a lot more than a great idea and some elbow grease to build a business from scratch. So a new Jackson program, called the Start-Up Institute, is running a business boot camp for entrepreneurs. Wyoming Public Radio's Rebecca Huntington has more. 

REBECCA HUNTINGTON: This is what you might consider finals for sixteen students completing Jackson's first-ever Start-Up Institute.

KELLIE HOTEMA: I'm too tired to be nervous.

Salt Lake City-based singer-songwriter Kate MacLeod has a new album coming out at the end of the year. At Ken Sanders Rare Books is a live collection of songs written over the past 30 years, all based on books. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer spoke with Kate MacLeod about the new record and her Wyoming-inspired songs.

Snake River Ranch

Ranchers have always planned for the next season and the next generation…and as such have been natural conservationists. But new management tools in the conservation toolbox are making it easier for land owners to be successful stewards of their land. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that ranchers are up for the challenge. 

National Museum of Wildlife Art

The government shutdown has hobbled Teton County, gateway to two national parks. But just south of the barricades, the National Museum of Wildlife Art offers dramatic views of wild animals in a new photo exhibit.

When the parks are open, tourists cruising by might miss the museum discretely built into the hillside. With the parks closed, fewer tourists are making the trip. Being overlooked is a theme in a new exhibit ‘The Wild Wonders of Europe.’ Museum president and CEO Jim McNutt says it shows wildlife can be seen in unexpected places.

Nate Ver Burg, founder of Elevated Ideas, has an uncanny ability to see things differently.  He uses this talent to instigate revolutionary change in business by forcing companies and industries to shatter their established mindsets.  Nate’s prescient perspective is equally influential in both business and personal experiences.  He lives and works in Jackson Hole.

Mexico's consul general for Utah and Wyoming, Eduardo Arnal Palomera, made a rare visit to Jackson this month. He held a public forum, chatted with some of the 180 people lined up to renew Mexican passports and IDs and also met with town and county officials.

Latino Resource Center Executive Director Sonia Capece says the visit was a big deal.

More than 500 industry people gathered in Jackson this week for the 17th Annual Wyoming Oil and Gas Fair. Wyoming Public Radio’s energy and natural resources reporter, Stephanie Joyce was there, and she joins us now to talk about the event.

BOB BECK: So, what are the biggest issues on the mind of Wyoming’s oil and gas industry right now?

Former lawyer turned fly fishing guide David Riley Bertsch has written a book dealing with both of his passions.  Jake Trent is the main Character in the book called Death Canyon. 

Trent is a former criminal lawyer turned fly fishing guide who runs a bed and breakfast in Jackson, Wyoming.  But some a late season avalanche kills a skier, a French couple may have suffered a bear attack, and Jake himself finds the body of a tourist in fishing gear. 

Ruth Ann moved to Jackson, Wyoming to start her own business in 1988.  Since then, she has owned two successful businesses and has become involved in Wyoming politics.  Learn about her journey to Jackson and her desire to serve as a Wyoming Representative.

Rebecca Huntington

A new group is convinced that, with a little coaching, Jackson Hole can become the Silicon Valley of the Rockies. In fact, this ad hoc group has even taken the name Silicon Couloir. (Coo-LAR) They're convinced that within the state the investors exist to help grow more startup businesses. But what's lacking is a venue for investors and entrepreneurs to meet. The possible solution is known as Pitch Day.   

Kathryn Turner

Wyoming landscape painter Kathryn Turner grew up on Triangle X Ranch in Grand Teton National Park surrounded by dramatic views of her favorite subject, the Tetons.

And in her words, she’s spent the past 20 years trying to do them justice. “And they are challenging! And what makes them challenging is they’re always changing, with the light, with the seasons, with the way the clouds move over them, obscuring them, changing the shadows. So they provide a lifetime of material,” added Turner.

His film and TV credits include the recent Smurfs movies, Shrek 2, and Rugrats, but screenwriter David Weiss also attracts attention for his faith. He grew up a secular Jew, converted to Christianity, and later became an observant orthodox Jew. That’s the subject of his lectures Friday and Saturday at the Chabad Jewish Center in Jackson. Wyoming Public Media’s Micah Schweizer reached Weiss by phone as he was driving from Los Angeles to Santa Monica to work on a script.

Rebecca Huntington

Roughly three years ago, two women undertook an effort to take a group of middle school girls in Jackson under their wing with the goal of helping them get into college.  The effort is called College Bound Latinas and the program has had some early success.  But a recent interaction with a University of Wyoming Professor is taking the girls even further as Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck reports.

Richard Bernstein is an attorney and triathlete who was born blind. He represents disabled clients pro-bono at his family’s law firm outside Detroit, and is an adjunct professor at Michigan State University.

He’s speaking his weekend at the Chabad Jewish Center of Wyoming in Jackson Hole. Bernstein’s talk, called “Vision is Overrated: A Blind Attorney and Athlete” is part of the Chabad Center’s “Distinguished Lecture Series.” He spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez from his cell phone in Yellowstone National Park.

Gloria Baxter: Professor Emeritus of the University of Memphis School of Dance and Theater, Gloria was invited by The Murie Center of Grand Teton National Park to create an original narrative theater adaptation based on the writings of Olaus and Margaret Murie, pioneers in the American wilderness movement.

Jackson Boy Scouts to auction off elk antlers

May 17, 2013

Jackson District Boy Scouts will host their annual Elk Antler Auction during Elkfest in the Jackson Town Square this weekend.

Each year, the Boy Scouts receive a special-use permit to collect shed antlers on the National Elk Refuge. They then tie the antlers into large bundles for customers to bid on by weight.

One-quarter of the proceeds benefit the Boy Scouts, and the rest will go to the Elk Refuge to fund elk habitat projects.

Elk Refuge spokeswoman Lori Iverson says many of the auction customers are artists.

If you’re looking for big, stately elk antlers to hang on your wall, the National Elk Refuge in Jackson would be a great place to find them… except the public isn’t allowed onto the elk habitat. Instead, the Refuge and the Jackson Boy Scouts are gathering and bundling antlers to sell at the annual Elk Antler Auction in Jackson next weekend to benefit elk habitat projects. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez spoke with the Refuge’s Lori Iverson about it. Iverson says she understands why people want elk antlers, but protecting the wildlife is her first priority.