Japanese Americans

Artist Estelle Ishigo was one of the few white women that went to a Wyoming Japanese-American internment camp. Estelle and her husband were imprisoned at Heart Mountain in 1942. During their three years at the camp, Estelle painted watercolors portraying the daily life. A new exhibit at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center called The Mountain Was Our Secret displays a collection of Estelle’s work. 

Courtesy of the Japanese American National Museum, Allen Eaton Collection

The “Mountain Was Our Secret” is the title of a new exhibit at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center. Heart Mountain was the site where 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated from 1942 to 1945.

Heart Mountain Interpretive Center

The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation is spearheading an effort to improve communication between 10 former Japanese American Confinement Sites.

The All Camps Consortium is a group of Japanese-American advocates and people in charge of historic sites like Heart Mountain near Powell.

The Modern West 20: U.S. Citizens Incarcerated In The West

Feb 20, 2017
Discover Nikkei

It’s the 75th anniversary of an executive order that incarcerated thousands of Japanese Americans in internment camps across the nation. This episode includes first-hand accounts from this era. 

Richard Cahan

A new book compiles government photos of Japanese-Americans in World War II incarceration camps, including Heart Mountain in Wyoming. For the first time, some of the people in the photos have been interviewed. 

Those interviews are included in Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II. Author Richard Cahan joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Erin Jones to talk about the stories of the photos.

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation

Seventy-four years ago as of last Friday, President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order to imprison thousands of Japanese Americans in internment camps nationwide. One of those camps was the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in northwest Wyoming, which operated for three years - from June 1942 to November 1945. More than 14,000 Japanese Americans passed through the complex.

Willow Belden

Word War 2 ended 70 years ago, and as more time passes, there are fewer and fewer people left who remember the era first hand. Sam Mihara is a survivor of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, a Japanese Internment Camp located between Cody and Powell.

He sat down with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about how, after staying away from Wyoming for more than 40 years, he was able to come back. 

Anne Cusack/Los Angeles Times

Wyoming Public Media's project, Wyoming Stories, was recently featured in an article by the Los Angeles Times by reporter John M. Glionna. Click here to read the full story.

Willow Belden

During World War II, thousands of Japanese Americans were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, near Cody. Heart Mountain was one of 10 internment camps across the U.S.

There is now a museum on the site, and each year, the Heart Mountain Foundation hosts a pilgrimage. During this year’s pilgrimage, Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden sat down with several former internees and produced this piece.

Click here to listen to other pieces in our Wyoming Stories series.

Willow Belden

Raymond Uno is a former judge from Salt Lake City. He was one of thousands of Japanese Americans who were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, near Cody, during World War II. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden interviewed Uno and produced this Wyoming Stories piece.

Willow Belden

Takashi Hoshizaki and his family were confined at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II. While confined there, he received his draft notice, and decided not to report. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden interviewed Hoshizaki and produced this Wyoming Stories piece.

Willow Belden

Shigeru Yabu and his family were incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center when he was 10. While there, he strove to make pets out of insects, worms, amphibians, and finally a bird. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden interviewed Yabu and produced this Wyoming Stories piece.

Willow Belden

Sam Mihara is a rocket scientist who worked for Boeing and later started his own high-tech consulting firm. He was incarcerated at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II, and he now travels around the country speaking about that experience. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden interviewed Mihara and produced this Wyoming Stories piece.