Lander Art Center

Darrah Perez

Today in Riverton, a class full of Native American jewelry makers are learning how to screen print. Eastern Shoshone member Hope Abeyta wants to screen print her logo on a child-size tepee. The Central Wyoming College course was created specifically for the eclipse since Riverton and much of the reservation falls inside the eclipse’s shadow. The goal is to get these artists the business skills they need to be ready for the event. Abeyta says she found the class on Facebook and signed up.

Lander Art Center

Friday, November 6, the third annual Native American Art Show opens in Lander. This year, the exhibit is breaking new ground by featuring the works of contemporary performance artists alongside traditional art.

At the opening, performance artists will showcase spoken word, hip hop, music, and poetry at the Middle Fork restaurant in downtown Lander.

At the Lander Art Center gallery, artists will collaborate on a painting.

givetake.squarespace.com

The Lander Art Center plans to host the first stop of a traveling art exhibition called “Give and Take.” The exhibition features the art of eleven women from Lander and Laramie. Artist Dannine Donaho says the artists all had one theme common in their work.

“The theme that we identified that we all had in common was nourishment. So we really liked sort of the reverse implication of the phrase give and take. You can take care of someone, which implies giving. Or you can give something up, which implies that something or someone has been taken away.”

Al Hubbard

Last week, the Lander Art Center hosted an opening for its second annual Native American art exhibit. The show runs through December 20 and boasts more than 50 artists, most of them from the Wind River Indian Reservation. One artist in the exhibit is Al Hubbard, a 42-year-old Navajo and Arapaho artist who says traditional Native American images are fine, but Hubbard says he’s more interested in using pop art and other contemporary styles to express his ideas about tribal history and spirituality.

An opening reception on Friday at 6 p.m. at the Lander Art Center will launch a new exhibit of Native American art work. It’s the show’s second year in a row and comes in honor of National Native American Heritage Month. The exhibit will showcase over 50 artists, mostly from Wind River Indian Reservation. Director Lisa Hueneke says, this year, about half the artists are students from reservation high schools. She says the exhibit demonstrates a wide diversity of artistic styles. One of the artists on display is Al Hubbard, a Northern Arapaho and Navajo artist.

[From the NEAT Newsletter - 2012]

The 2011-2012 Native Emerging Artist Training (NEAT) is now in full swing celebrating 10 students who have already completed 25% of the NEAT curriculum. The NEAT program is designed to teach local Native American artists the professional behind-the-scenes skills of entering art exhibitions and juried shows.