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As another Marvel Comics-inspired movie dominates the box office, a Wyoming teen has tapped into the franchise’s superpowers for a triumph of her own. The team of superheroes, the Avengers, probably needs no introduction. And neither does the mastermind behind those characters—Stan Lee. For Marvel Comics fans, he’s the ultimate superhero.

“Actually, I had never really been a fan before this project,” confesses Hazel Homer-Wambeam. She’s 14, wrapping up homeschooled 8th grade, and lives in Laramie.

Cynthia Stoffers

A new mural inspired by an Australian myth is now on display at the Laramie Community Recreation Center. The colorful 5 by 18 foot mural was created by about 70 kids in the Rec Center’s School Age Child Care program.

Laramie artist and educator Paul Taylor spent a week with the kids, singing and telling the ancient Australian aboriginal story of how Rainbow Snake created the rivers. “As Rainbow made the rivers, Rainbow then went off, and he went off into a billabong. And all the children rushed over to the billabong to see the beautiful rainbow colors disappear into the water…”

Aaron Schrank

 

Laramie made history last night when the city council passed Wyoming’s first broad ordinance banning discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation.

 

The ordinance, which passed by a vote of 7-2,  covers public or private employment, housing, and public accommodations like bars or restaurants. The town of Jackson also has an LGBT anti discrimination ordinance on the books, but it only covers public employees.

 

Friends of Nepal at the University of Wyoming

Last month’s earthquake in Nepal dealt a devastating blow to the small country. Almost 8,000 people were killed and hundreds of thousands of homes were destroyed. Nepal is thousands of miles away from Wyoming, but emotional aftershocks are being felt in towns like Laramie and Jackson.

Mike Higgins / http://bicyclecorps.blogspot.com/

The Train Depot in Laramie will host a talk on the only African-American bicycle corps of the U.S. Army on Saturday, May 2.

The group was formed in Missoula, Montana in the 1890s. Wyoming elementary school teacher Mike Higgins has researched the group for years. He says the corps was the idea of an officer named James Moss, who was looking to make a name for himself. Moss latched onto the idea that bikes could be used in combat.

Larry Stewart, Founder Of Manufacturing Works

Jan 5, 2015
Diana Denison
istockphoto.com

The 2014 Wyoming Forum kicked off yesterday with a discussion of Wyoming’s tech scene between Governor Matt Mead and two prominent California entrepreneurs. One big topic was whether the Cheyenne-Laramie area or Jackson was the most promising for growth. 

Paul Montoya

Another Halloween came and went, along with our event with author and humorist David Sedaris. We asked attendees to show up up in their best dressed for Wyoming Public Media's first ever costume contest. We were astounded by how many amazing costumes we saw, which made it nearly impossible to choose a winner. Thank you to everyone who came to David Sedaris and participated in our Halloween costume contest, it was a blast!

If you attended the event and wore a costume, please send us your photo to be included in this post: arader1@uwyo.edu

Caroline Ballard

If you’re handing out candy to trick-or-treaters tonight, you might see a lot of little girls in the same costume.

Since it came out last December, the Disney movie Frozen has been catching the attention of girls everywhere. It’s ice-queen princess Elsa is a favorite among them, especially for her number one anthem “Let it Go” The song has been everywhere. 

Jordan Giese

October 24th is the grand opening of the University of Wyoming’s new Gateway Center, which will serve as a "front door" to the university for new students and families. 

The thirty-five million dollar facility will house UW’s admissions office, career services, alumni association and the UW Foundation, which secures private donations for the school. The Foundation’s President Ben Blalock says the building has had significant help from many prominent UW alum and other Wyomingites. Blalock says the private funding was crucial. 

Shirley Kingston - Laramie WY

Oct 20, 2014
Shirley Kingston

On any day of the week, I am educated and informed on what's going on in maybe Israel, West  Africa, Syria, Iraq; even Chicago, Ferguson. Laramie, Centennial, Jackson; and in its season, the Wyoming Legislature  in Cheyenne. Bob Beck and his crews' special programs. ALSO, such pleasure with treasured Ira Glass and Terry Gross.

Caroline Ballard

Hundreds of people gathered in Laramie earlier this month in memory of victims of Domestic Abuse. Since 1985 over 60 people have been killed in Wyoming in instances of domestic violence, and each year the Silent Witness Ceremony and March pays remembrance.

As a bagpipe plays at the head of a column of people, Sonny and Laurie Pulver hold wooden silhouette between the two of them as they march through the streets of Laramie.

“We’re carrying my husband’s sister’s silhouette. She was killed New Year’s Eve of 1999,” says Laurie.

Caroline Ballard

The Berlin Wall came down in East Germany 25 years ago, but last week a new wall went up here in Wyoming. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard finds out why history is repeating itself.

Young adults with spray paint cans stand in front of a colorful canvas. They graffiti the 32-foot long wall with calls for freedom, unity and love.

The structure is topped with barbed wire and is manned by American and East German guards. No, this isn’t Berlin circa 1989. It’s 2014, and this is the south end of the University of Wyoming.

Pamela Ten Eyck

A movie that was filmed and produced in Laramie premiers on the big screen tonight at the Gryphon Theatre. London Homer-Wambeam wrote and shot ‘Project Cora’ while he was still in high school. He’s now a freshman at the University of Wyoming, and he stopped by our studios to talk about his Artificial Intelligence romance movie with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Larry Knopp

The Wyoming Humanities Council is staging its second annual Ignite Laramie event on Wednesday, September 10. The audience will hear roughly ten fast-paced mixed-media presentations. Speakers have five minutes to present their ideas, such as what it means to invest in local music, the fallacies in our everyday logic, or how to trust oneself to make hard decisions.

Organizer Jason Burge says the talks are centered on the idea of community.

The Wyoming Legislature’s Joint Judiciary Committee will consider a bill next week in Laramie that could end up abolishing the state’s death penalty law. 

Currently states are having difficulty acquiring the chemicals to perform lethal injections, so the Judiciary Committee has been looking at other alternatives…including firing squads. But House Committee Chairman Keith Gingery says another alternative is to abolish the death penalty.

I Love WPR Laramie Proclamation

Sep 4, 2014
City of Laramie and Wyoming Public Media
Bob Beck

The Wyoming Cowboys football season fell apart last year. The Cowboys finished with five wins and seven losses, but lost five of their last six games. After the season ended the Cowboys also lost their Coach, and watched their starting quarterback AND his backup leave the team. New Coach Craig Bohl had a lot of success coaching at North Dakota State where he won three National Championships in a division below Wyoming. The question is whether he and his coaching staff can turn things around in Laramie. 

Wyoming Art Party

The Wyoming Art Party is a new arts organization. No, we won’t be seeing Art Party candidates on the November ballot; think party, as in fun and festivities. The Wyoming Art Party’s inaugural event opens with a reception Friday, August 22 at a temporary gallery in Laramie. It’s a collaborative exhibit called ‘A Portrait of Wyoming.’ Laramie artists June Glasson and Meg Thompson are the founders of the Wyoming Art Party. They stopped by to explain the project to Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Suriel via flickr

The Albany County Library received an emergency infusion of over $100,000 this week.

That money was allocated by the Albany County Commissioners to help the library cover a budget deficit of around $70,000 dollars for this fiscal year.

“We would have had to completely gut the programming and materials. No more programming and materials for the year,” says library manager Joey Dingess. “To be quite honest, we wouldn’t be able to pay our bills the rest of the year.”

Arturo de Albornoz via Flickr

An animal rights group has announced plans to erect a billboard in the Laramie area that depicts a dog locked in a cage. This comes after the news that a child was allegedly kept in a cage in Albany County.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA, plan to put up a billboard will read quote “no one belongs in a cage. Never crate your dog.”
PETA campaigner Matt Bruce says this case is a tragedy.

Cordelia Zars

Dance class begins at 9 a.m. in the studio. The six students disappear and are replaced by dancing cowboys, swaying and lassoing to the beat of the song.

Instructor Kayc DeMaranville leads. She helps them coordinate their bodies to the rhythm. The students are lost in the music, spinning, kicking, waving their arms. Student Eric Petersen loves to dance. He says it makes his body feel “a little bit of good.”

A woman struck by lightning in the Vedauwoo Recreation Area near Laramie Tuesday afternoon is currently being hospitalized for injuries. Fire Chief Dan Johnson says the woman was climbing higher on the rocks than her six companions when a fast-moving storm descended. He says after the strike she was able to climb down on her own.

“She was able to come off the rocks to meet our ambulance crew down at the ground level so there was no type of a rock rescue or any kind of a rope rescue that needed to be done.”

Laramie-based Relative Theatrics is raising money for a new production through the crowdfunding website IndieGoGo. Anne Mason is the founder and producer of Relative Theatrics. She tells Wyoming Public Radio's Caroline Ballard that many people don't realize the hidden costs that figure into a community theater's budget.

Diana Denison

When Jarl Mohn, NPR’s new CEO, first mentioned that he planned to make a short trip across the U.S in a single-engine plane, dropping in on stations along the way, Wyoming Public Radio got on the list. We were warned that if selected, we would have to be ready immediately, and we would have to flexible just in case weather and flight logistics got in the way. In short, the plan needed to be quick, simple, and adjustable.  No disappointment if it didn’t happen!

Melodie Edwards

Too many jobs, not enough bodies. That’s the dilemma of many Wyoming construction companies these days that can’t keep up with the building demands of the state’s energy boom. An influx of Latino workers are moving to Wyoming to take up the slack. And national figures show that Hispanics lead the nation in fatal injuries. And with Wyoming having one of the worst records for workplace fatalities, the question is: are Latinos putting themselves in the line of fire? 

Steam Vapor Co.

The Laramie City Council is discussing whether or not it wants to regulate e-cigarettes. They have held one informational meeting so far, and are expected to decide in the coming weeks whether or not to add vaporizing and electronic cigarettes to the citywide public smoking ban or to develop a separate ordinance.

The city regulates where smoking can occur.  Councilwoman Vicky Henry says that the council is trying to decide if it wants to regulate electronic cigarettes and how to go about it. E-cigarettes and vaporizers produce a liquid vapor, rather than smoke.

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