laramie

The Hilde Project

A Laramie organization that teaches women to sew, knit and crochet is holding a crowdfunding campaign to raise enough money to stay open for another year. The Hilde Project teaches classes in sewing, knitting and crocheting to give women a marketable skill.

Bren Lieskie, an instructor at The Hilde Project, said these days knitting and sewing are almost ancient arts.

University of Wyoming Geological Museum - Laramie

Sep 28, 2017
University of Wyoming Geological Museum

The University of Wyoming Geological Museum, in the east wing of the S.H. Knight Geology Building, exhibits the story of ancient Wyoming.

University of Wyoming Planetarium – Laramie

Sep 22, 2017
University of Wyoming Planetarium

Planetarium Shows and Schedule:

The UW Harry C Vaughan Planetarium offers shows that are open to the public on Tuesday and Friday evenings as well as every other Saturday morning.  Saturday shows are geared toward a younger audience and include a free activity after the show.  Please see the schedule online at http://www.uwyo.edu/physics/_files/docs/planetarium.html or email planetarium@uwyo.edu for more information on show titles and descriptions.

Melodie Edwards

The controversial play “What Would Crazyhorse Do?” recently made its national debut in Laramie, of all places. Playwright and Lakota member Larissa Fasthorse said the script is her most widely read but no other theaters have actually performed it until now. She said that had a lot to do with the play's subject matter.

Racial purity.

Early in the play, after grieving the death of their grandfather, twins Calvin and Journey got a knock on their door.

“We don’t want any more funeral food!” shouted Journey.

Anna Rader

Psychedelic rock band Elk Tongue live on 3/31/17 on during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

Brooklynn Gray

Hundreds of University of Wyoming students, faculty, and community members protested the outcome of last week’s election with a Solidarity Walk Out Monday.

Reports of discrimination and harassment of minorities have increased across the U.S. in recent days. The solidarity walk, which started at the Wyoming Union before heading downtown and back, was meant to show support for LGBTQ individuals, Muslims, immigrants and other marginalized groups.

TLLAMWY (Own work) via Wikimedia Commons

Construction for a long awaited replacement bridge from the east side of Laramie to the west is about to begin. The current Clark street bridge that runs over Laramie’s train tracks has connected the city the city for 53 years, but faced a number of safety concerns. The new bridge will be located on Harney street.

Wyoming Department of Transportation engineer Steve Cook said the current structure is too weak for rehabilitation and its materials will not be used in the construction of the new bridge.

arts.gov

  

The Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Jane Chu, was recently in Laramie. The visit was one of hundreds of trips Chu has made to communities around the country to see first-hand the role the arts are playing. Chairman Chu stopped by our studios to talk with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

A Laramie man has been arrested for the October 1985 murder of a Laramie woman. 

Sixty-seven-year-old Fredrick J. Lamb has been charged with first degree murder and first degree arson in the death of 22-year-old University of Wyoming student Shelli Wiley. 

Police at the time of the murder said that Wiley was stabbed 11 times, sexually assaulted, and that her West Laramie apartment was set on fire. Police did find a bloody hand print near the murder, but were unable to convict anyone. 

Caroline Ballard

  

The Cathedral Home for Children just north of Laramie is a boarding school for teens that have had traumatic experiences. Besides providing a safe space, the home helps the kids deal with their emotions. This summer they’re trying something new – drumming circles.

Public Domain

 

The question comes up every election year. Does my vote count? The answer sometimes depends on what race or issue you are voting on. Wyoming is a very Republican state, so if you are not part of the GOP it’s possible that your vote might mean very little, especially in the presidential race.

But even if you are Republican, Wyoming has a mere three electoral votes. Wyoming Public Radio intern Liam Niemeyer met up with Wyoming voters in Laramie recently and asked—does your vote count?

An African American woman was injured in what she said was a racially motivated attack in Laramie early Sunday morning. 

The victim is a former Laramie resident who posted on her Facebook page that she and two other African Americans were returning from a night at Laramie’s Jubilee Days when they were approached by a small group who shouted racial slurs at the victim's group and threatened to kill them. 

Wyoming Art Party

The Wyoming Art Party is holding four free art workshops to prepare for Laramie’s upcoming Jubilee Days parade. Adrienne Vetter is a local artist and one of the event’s organizers. She says the workshops fit the Art Party’s mission to help community members express their inner creativity.

Wyoming Arts Council

The Wyoming Independent Music Initiative will feature nine Laramie bands in a free concert Saturday, June 25. WIMI is a broad initiative by the Wyoming Arts Council to grow the state’s live music scene.

Jennifer Becker

At a recent school board meeting, Laramie High School senior Rihanna Kelver showed up to tonight’s school board meeting with a call to action.

“I am asking that the Board take initiative now to protect these students,” Kelver says. “As soon as we lose a student by the 50 percent rate suicide that transgender youth face, the blood will be on our hands.”

tarapappasart.com

Laramie artist Tara Pappas is well known for colorful, whimsical art that looks like it’s lifted from the pages of a story book or fairy tale. The public has an opportunity to learn her style and techniques at a painting workshop in Laramie on February 19. Pappas is also an elementary school art teacher, and as she tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, it was her students who inspired her to get back to work as a studio artist.

Stephanie Joyce

There are few places where the connection between energy and food is more obvious than at the Bright Agrotech warehouse in Laramie, Wyoming.

Most of the building is filled floor to ceiling with giant shelves of cardboard boxes and tubing—equipment Bright Agrotech sells to farmers—but in one corner of the warehouse, there’s a small farm: rows and rows of greens and herbs, growing in white vertical towers under dozens of bright LEDs. The hum of electricity is palpable.

laramiemainstreet.org

Artists are invading downtown Laramie this weekend. Local artists of all kinds will “pop up” in local businesses and on the streets for the Laramie Pop-Up Artwalk.

It’s a creation of the Wyoming Art Party, the Wyoming Arts Council, and the Downtown Laramie Business Alliance. 26 artists, including street performers and buskers, are scheduled. Local artist Adrienne Vetter has extended an invitation for any artist who would like to join at the event.

City of Laramie

At a city council meeting tonight in Laramie, a nonprofit group will request a lease on 115 acres of city-owned land to grow food for the hungry. 

Albany County has some of the highest rates of food insecurity in the state, according to University of Wyoming Public Health Professor Christine Porter.

Miles Bryan

  

H+S Coffee Head Roaster Coulter Sunderman has some advice for how you should consume your morning cup of coffee: remember to slurp.

“You want to slurp,” Sunderman says before a coffee tasting at H+S’s space in downtown Laramie. “It aerates the coffee across your tongue.”

The tasting would be familiar to anyone who's been to a wine tasting: the gathered coffee fans sample six unmarked cups, and toss out tasting notes like “cashew,” “peanut butter,” and “cola.”

Bob Beck

Lots of people like to run and many have chosen to run marathons. But not that many have decided to run beyond that. One such person is gearing up for an upcoming 100 mile race that she’s running for the second time. There’s lots of ways Jennifer Bartel and her three kids and dog spend time together, but lately a lot of that family time has been spent running. Bartel runs a lot.

“I try to keep it right around 50 miles a week, mostly because when I boost it over that I start to feel really poor from my neck all the way down, so I stick right at 50 miles.  

Flickr Creative Commons

The Pole Mountain area of the Laramie Range between Laramie and Cheyenne is gaining steadily in popularity. And all that heavy recreation traffic is starting to show with many new unapproved roads causing damage to the landscape. That’s a problem since the area is also the source for the city of Cheyenne’s water.

Aaron Voos is a spokesman for the Medicine Bow National Forest and says that’s why the Forest is hosting a series of public meetings about how to best deal with the increased traffic around Pole Mountain. 

commons.wikimedia.org

As another Marvel Comics-inspired movie dominates the box office, a Wyoming teen has tapped into the franchise’s superpowers for a triumph of her own. The team of superheroes, the Avengers, probably needs no introduction. And neither does the mastermind behind those characters—Stan Lee. For Marvel Comics fans, he’s the ultimate superhero.

“Actually, I had never really been a fan before this project,” confesses Hazel Homer-Wambeam. She’s 14, wrapping up homeschooled 8th grade, and lives in Laramie.

Cynthia Stoffers

A new mural inspired by an Australian myth is now on display at the Laramie Community Recreation Center. The colorful 5 by 18 foot mural was created by about 70 kids in the Rec Center’s School Age Child Care program.

Laramie artist and educator Paul Taylor spent a week with the kids, singing and telling the ancient Australian aboriginal story of how Rainbow Snake created the rivers. “As Rainbow made the rivers, Rainbow then went off, and he went off into a billabong. And all the children rushed over to the billabong to see the beautiful rainbow colors disappear into the water…”

Aaron Schrank

 

Laramie made history last night when the city council passed Wyoming’s first broad ordinance banning discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation.

 

The ordinance, which passed by a vote of 7-2,  covers public or private employment, housing, and public accommodations like bars or restaurants. The town of Jackson also has an LGBT anti discrimination ordinance on the books, but it only covers public employees.

 

Friends of Nepal at the University of Wyoming

Last month’s earthquake in Nepal dealt a devastating blow to the small country. Almost 8,000 people were killed and hundreds of thousands of homes were destroyed. Nepal is thousands of miles away from Wyoming, but emotional aftershocks are being felt in towns like Laramie and Jackson.

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