Wyoming NORML and Wyoming Purple Cross, medical marijuana advocate groups in the state, are hosting a public meeting to discuss the Peggy A. Kelly Wyoming Cannabis Act. Right now, the groups are working to get enough signatures to put the issue on the 2017 ballot. This would allow voters to decide whether or not to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

Miles Bryan


Last year a couple of Wyoming judges ruled that state law does not have specific penalties for marijuana-laced edibles. Wyoming law enforcement officials say that ever since Colorado legalized marijuana they are seeing more of it than ever before and so lawmakers tried and failed to address the issue during the recent legislative session. The main problem was that lawmakers got hung up on how much edible marijuana constitutes a felony and the bill died.

Micah Baldwin, Flickr Creative Commons


Last year, when Tongue River High School students Taylor Holiday and Kylee Knobloch were asked to come up with a project for their leadership club, they decided to tackle a real-world problem.

“There was a few kids in our school that seemed to be struggling with drugs a little bit,” says Holiday. “So we thought, ‘what if we could make the change in this school that helped kids get away from issues like that?’”

A bill that would have clarified how edible marijuana possession would be handled in the courts has died. That's after it failed to come up for debate on the final day to discuss bills in the House. 

The Senate had passed a bill that would have made possessing three ounces of marijuana-infused edibles a felony, but the House reduced that to a misdemeanor.  

By Subvertc, Wikipedia Commons

A Wyoming legislative committee has voted to make possession of edible marijuana a misdemeanor and will require prosecutors to determine how much marijuana is actually in the candy, drink, or other products. 

The House Judiciary committee changed the Senate version of the bill that had said possession of three ounces of edible marijuana was a felony. Laramie Democrat Charles Pelkey said the focus will now be on the amount of marijuana in the edible.

Bob Beck / Wyoming Public Radio

A Wyoming Senate Committee has decided that possession of three ounces or more of marijuana-laced food or drink should equal a felony.  

Some judges in the state have ruled that current Wyoming law does not criminalize marijuana-laced products, the legislation would fix that. 

While the state doesn’t have the ability to test the level of the psychoactive chemical THC in edible marijuana, Byron Oedekoven of the Wyoming Association of Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police says most marijuana edibles they see are strictly labeled. 

Torbin Hansen via Flickr Creative Commons

As advocates gather signatures to put the question of medical marijuana legalization in Wyoming before voters next year, Campbell County school officials are ramping upping efforts to prevent use among students.

The school board has signed on to a campaign called “There is No Debate,” aimed at educating parents and students about the effects of marijuana on academic performance and brain development.

This week, the Board will finalize a resolution asking the Wyoming School Boards Association to take up the cause statewide. 

Courtesy Wyoming NORML


A Wyoming group has received permission to collect nearly 25 thousand signatures by February in an effort to get an initiative on the ballot. It would legalize the use of medical marijuana among other things. Chris Christian is the Executive Director of the group Wyoming NORML and she says it was time legalization became a topic of discussion in Wyoming. She explains her interest to Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck. 

You can learn more about Wyoming NORML’s effort at

Wyoming NORML

Those wanting medical marijuana legalized in the state will soon be able to collect signatures. The Wyoming Secretary of State’s office has certified the application for ballot initiative concerning the Peggy A. Kelly Cannabis Act of 2016. 

For it to actually get on the ballot the group Wyoming NORML must collect 25,673 signatures. Executive Director Chris Christian says while it’s a first step…it’s a big one.

Governor Matt Mead is creating a task force that is intended to gather information on the pros and cons of legalizing marijuana in Wyoming. 

The governor says he continues to oppose any legalization of the drug. But he says he wants to get ahead of a possible 2016 general election ballot initiative that could ask voters to decide whether to legalize medical marijuana. 


Wyoming marijuana advocates filed a petition to put an initiative to legalize medical marijuana on the 2016 ballot.

The Wyoming chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws filed the paperwork with the secretary of state’s office on Monday.

The group will have to collect more than 25,000 signatures by February 8th to get the initiative on the ballot. To become law, the initiative would have to be approved by a majority of Wyoming voters.

Wikimedia Commons

Judges and attorneys are concerned about how to prosecute possession of edible marijuana products in Wyoming. Under current law, the entire edible, like a cookie or a lollipop is weighed and those in possession of more than three ounces of any marijuana-infused product can be charged with a felony

The Legislature’s Joint Judiciary Committee is tackling the issue over several meetings after hearing concerns during the last legislative session. Senator Leland Christensen chairs that committee and says the Wyoming Controlled Substances Act is too vague on edibles.

A bill that would have allowed the use of medical marijuana was killed in a Wyoming House Committee on a 5 to 4 vote.  The bill was sponsored by Casper Republican Gerald Gay. 

He said cannabis use would have been regulated by medical providers and the goal was to help address a number of pain issues.  A Doctor testified that it has a number of pain benefits. Gillette Republican Bill Pownall says Wyoming is not ready for this yet.

A bill that would have decriminalized marijuana in Wyoming was soundly defeated by the Wyoming House of Representatives Wednesday. 

Representative Jim Byrd of Cheyenne had proposed legislation to punish those in possession of small amounts of marijuana with fines, instead of criminal convictions. But a majority of Representatives feared that the change would encouraging marijuana use. Lovell Republican Elaine Harvey had strong concerns.

A bill drafted for the upcoming Wyoming legislative session would attempt to lower penalties for possession of small amounts of Marijuana. Representative Jim Byrd of Cheyenne is sponsoring the bill which would make possession of less than an ounce of Marijuana a civil fine instead of a felony.

House Bill 29 would only fine citizens up to $100 for one ounce of the drug.  A third possession offense could carry jail time and probation, but that punishment would not be mandatory and would be left up to the judge.

Lord Jim via Flickr Creative Commons

Cigarette smoking rates among high school students have dropped significantly in recent decades—in Wyoming and the rest of the country. That’s according to the results of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey released last week. 

Last year, 17 percent of Wyoming high-schoolers reported regularly smoking cigarettes. That’s slightly above the national average, but down from 40 percent in 1991, when the survey began.

A group known as Wyoming NORML, which stands for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws wants to make recreational pot legal in Wyoming.  The proposed initiative would make it legal to grow, sell and transport marijuana, and to purchase up to three ounces.

The group’s director Chris Christian says that legalization could make the state money.  Colorado expects to make eight-billion-dollars in revenues this year.  And, she says, decriminalizing pot could save the state millions of dollars, too.

Representative Sue Wallis has drafted a bill that would legalize medical marijuana in Wyoming. She’s even considering revising it to include recreational marijuana, as well. Wallis toured facilities in Colorado where recreational marijuana is packaged and labeled and says she was impressed with how smoothly everything is going. 

While Colorado has legalized marijuana, Governor Matt Mead has no interest in seeing Wyoming do the same.  During a recent conference call with reporters, Mead was asked if he would support legalizing marijuana in the state.  His answer was no.

Former Judge tells Wyoming to change drug laws

Mar 26, 2013

A former Colorado Municipal Judge who’s a member of the group Law Enforcement against prohibition wants Wyoming to change its drug laws. 

Lenny Freiling says that Wyoming spent more than 12 million dollars enforcing laws against marijuana in 2008.  He says a better approach is to legalize marijuana like Colorado has.  Freiling says one huge downside concerning the war on drugs is the long term impact it can have on someone who takes drugs.

Authorities are investigating after a 35-year-old man was killed in a car crash in Converse County during a high-speed chase that involved a state trooper.

Brian A. Bonomo of Cheyenne was pulled over for speeding on Wyoming Highway 59 on Saturday evening. Wyoming Highway Patrol spokesman Sgt. Stephen Townsend says the trooper smelled marijuana on Bonomo
as he was handing him the ticket.