microsoft

Stephanie Joyce

With backing from the co-founder of Microsoft, two environmental groups filed suit Tuesday over the federal government’s coal leasing program.

Bob Beck

Last week, Governor Matt Mead attended a cable cutting for a new biogas-fueled data center in Cheyenne. It’s a zero emissions demonstration project built in collaboration with Microsoft, the governor’s office, the University of Wyoming and the utilities industry. Cheyenne LEADS is an economic development group that helped coordinate the project.

The group’s CEO Randy Bruns says many solid waste plants around the U.S. create biofuel to control the methane build-up they produce and to power their facilities. But no one has ever tried powering a data center with this kind of energy.

Sean Ellis via Flickr

A Data Center celebrated the grand opening of its massive expansion Wednesday in Cheyenne.

Green House spokesperson Wendy Fox says Wyoming’s cool climate allows the data center to regulate its temperature only using the outside air.

Green House spokesperson Wendy Fox says Wyoming’s cool climate makes it uniquely suited to the data center’s needs.

Microsoft plans to expand its data center operations in Wyoming. Microsoft opened a data center outside of Cheyenne last year…and this spring plans to grow it with a $274 million addition. Governor Matt Mead met the news with excitement. He says he’s made growing the Wyoming technology sector a priority and sees the expansion as a good sign.

Wyoming is aggressively working to attract data centers to the state.  The industry magazine Expansion Solutions recently recognized the Cowboy State’s efforts to accommodate companies looking to build or expand their computing operations.

Wyoming Business Council CEO Bob Jensen says his organization targets trade shows, real estate directors and data management industry publications to promote Wyoming’s offerings, including a cool climate, cheap power, and lots of space to build.

Jensen says Wyoming has a lot of competition to attract these businesses.

UW to benefit from demonstration project

Dec 31, 2012

The University of Wyoming will get to participate in Microsoft’s innovative fuel cell demonstration pilot project.  

The fuel cell being built in Cheyenne will essentially be powered by sewage.  After 18 months of use by Microsoft, the City of Cheyenne and the University will get access to the so called Data Plant. U-W Chemical and Petroleum Engineering professor David Bagley says a number of students will benefit.