National History Day

Wyoming State Historical Society

In 1969, fourteen African-American football players were dismissed from the University of Wyoming team because they wanted to wear black armbands as a sign of protest in their upcoming game against the Mormon owned and operated Brigham Young University.

At the time the Mormon Church barred black men from the priesthood. The incident divided the UW community and broke the Cowboys winning streak that year. Education reporter Tennessee Watson talks to River Gayton, a high school student circulating a petition to increase awareness of the Black 14, and their decision to take a stand.

Some Wyoming students won awards at the National History Day competition in Maryland.

Laramie’s Hazel Homer-Wambeam and Jackson Higgins won first place for their Junior Group Performance entitled “The Golden Age of Radio: Turning Points in American Culture.

Brianne Beale and Nicole Collins from Jackson received third place for their Senior Group Documentary “The Gray Wolf Reintroduction: A Scientific Approach to Protect the Yellowstone Ecosystem.”

Thirteen Jackson Hole High School students swept the preliminary rounds of a competition that will take them to Washington, DC next month, where they’ll represent Wyoming at the National History Day competition.

Fifteen-year old Bella Wood is a student in teacher Jeff Brazil’s Honors U.S. History class, which participated in the contest themed “Turning Points in History.” She says this is her second chance to take a project to the national competition. Wood says they’re experiences she’ll take with her into college and beyond.