NOLS

Wyoming Outdoor Council

Researchers at the University of Washington are proposing better ways to study the link between health and exposure to the natural world.

A multi-disciplinary group of scientists analyzed existing research to come up with strategies to improve understanding of the subject. Pooja Tandon, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington and one of the authors of the study, said it is a good bet that being in nature has a positive impact.

Mike Hepler, NOLS PR & marketing intern

Outdoor recreation is one of the top three money making industries in Wyoming, and a new organization hopes to help grow that potential even further. The National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and Flitner Strategies in Jackson have recently partnered to form the Wyoming Outdoor Business Association. 

Flitner Strategies President Sara Flitner said one thing most Wyomingites agree on is their love for Wyoming’s great outdoors.

NOLS

  

The National Outdoor Leadership School, or NOLS, turns 50 years old this Fall. The organization teaches outdoor safety and wilderness medicine and also has programs for leadership, networking, and general adventure in the outdoors.

NOLS was founded in Wyoming and is still headquartered in Lander, where it serves tens of thousands of students each year. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard caught up with John Gans, the executive director at NOLS, to hear his take on the school’s 50-year legacy.

nols.edu

The National Outdoor Leadership School, or NOLS, turns 50 years old this fall.

The organization was founded in Wyoming in 1965 and is still headquartered in Lander. But in its fifty-year history, the school has offered courses on all seven continents. NOLS teaches outdoor safety and wilderness medicine, and it also has programs for leadership, networking, and general adventure in the outdoors.

John Gans, the executive director at NOLS, says what sets the school apart from other programs is its staff.

Wyoming Outdoor Council

The phrase “mountain streams” usually comes with the word “pristine” in front of it. But here in Wyoming, some outdoor recreation groups are saying, not for long. That’s because last year, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality downgraded the status of about 87,000 miles of small creeks and drainages in the state’s highest country. For years, these streams have been considered primary recreation, which means they could be used for swimming and the DEQ would clean them up even if a small amount of e. coli, was found in them.

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The Outdoor Industry Association announced its 2012 Outdoor Inspiration Awards Thursday, and the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) was named the winner of the group category.

Of 250 nominees, NOLS was determined by a panel of outdoor business and community leaders to be the group most inspirational in encouraging people to appreciate, support, and recreate in the outdoors. The group category was comprised of “two or more who have come together to get great things done, and get even better things started.”