Republican Senator Mike Enzi

Tuesday night, incumbent U.S. Senator Mike Enzi handily won his race against Democratic challenger Charlie Hardy, taking over 70 percent of the vote. Enzi has served in the U.S. Senate since 1997 and worked on numerous committees including Finance and Homeland Security. While he is considered one of the most conservative senators in office, he’s also given for credit for working across the aisle on many issues. Enzi says he’s signed over 100 bills into law during his tenure in office.

In a televised debate Monday night among Wyoming candidates for U.S. Senate, Democratic challenger Charlie Hardy questioned Republican incumbent Senator Mike Enzi's ability to work with lawmakers outside his own party.

"Senator Enzi prides himself on working across the aisle. For example, working with Senator Ted Kennedy. But I really believe he hasn't realized that Ted Kennedy died about five years ago. He did work a lot across the aisle, but now being known as the second most conservative senator in congress, that I do not see as of value," said Hardy.

Senator Mike Enzi (R)

After winning Tuesday's primary, incumbent Republican US Senator Mike Enzi will face off against Democrat Charlie Hardy in the November general election.

The Republican race was once expected to be tight, with Enzi facing a challenge from Liz Cheney, but Enzi won in a landslide after Cheney dropped out earlier this year. His four lesser-known challengers collectively took less than 20 percent of the vote. Going into the general election, Enzi says he won't be campaigning against Democrat Charlie Hardy, but instead promoting his record.

In a letter signed by 16 senators and himself, U.S. Senator Mike Enzi has asked the federal Committee on Appropriations to continue funding the Payments in Lieu of Taxes – or PILT - program. The program contributes money to counties with federal lands within their borders. The payments help make up for what counties lose by not being able to collect taxes on those lands.

Wyoming’s two U.S. Senators plan to vote against a budget compromise that will be taken up by the Senate on Wednesday.  Senator Mike Enzi spoke out against the deal on the Senate floor.  Enzi says it cuts too little, if anything.

“We talk about how we have reduced the deficit.  Reduced the deficit?  Yeah, that means we used to be overspending a trillion dollars a year and now we are only overspending $500 billion, which is half a trillion.  That’s still overspending,” says Enzi.

Wyoming Senators Oppose Budget Deal

Dec 17, 2013

Wyoming’s two U-S Senators plan to vote against a budget compromise that will be taken up by the Senate on Wednesday.  Senator Mike Enzi spoke out against the deal on the Senate floor.  Enzi says it cuts too little...if anything.

“We talk about how we have reduced the deficit.  Reduced the deficit?  Yeah, that means we used to be overspending a trillion dollars a year and now we are only overspending $500 billion, which is half a trillion.  That’s still overspending.”

Wyoming’s senior Republican Senator Mike Enzi is on a special budget conference committee that he says has already become a moot point. Matt Laslo reports from Washington on why he’s given up on the group before its really gotten to work.

MATT LASLO: Senator Mike Enzi, along with seventeen Senate Republicans, voted against the final deal to reopen the federal government and avoid a potential default on the nation’s debt.