rocky mountain power

A nation-wide telephone scam aimed at power company customers is beginning to target customers in Wyoming. Rocky Mountain Power which services Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado;  says a small number of its customers have been fraudulently charged by people posing as power company representatives.

Company Spokesperson Margaret Oler says the scam has been going on for several years now, but calls have recently moved towards Wyoming and the Pacific Northwest.

Leigh Paterson

Wyoming has some of the most powerful wind in the country. So, earlier this month, a massive wind farm got the green light from the state. If the Chokecherry and Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project gets federal approval, it will become the largest in the country. But who’s buying all that wind power? Right now there is no way to get it out of Wyoming, to the other states that really need it. For Inside Energy, Leigh Paterson reports on why transmission gridlocks are keeping Wyoming wind at bay.

The National Climate Assessment says Wyoming’s energy sector could find itself squeezed for water in the future. Both energy production and generation consume large amounts of water, but changes in precipitation patterns mean there will be less of it to go around. The report points out that across the nation, water shortages already threaten power generation for more than a million homes. That's expected to increase.

Rocky Mountain Power’s Jeff Hymas says climate change is definitely something the utility takes into account when planning for the future.

Rocky Mountain Power is asking regulators for permission to raise rates by an average of 5.3 percent starting in January 2015. That would translate to an extra $4.50 a month for average residential customers. Company spokesman Jeff Hymas says the rate increase is necessary for a number of reasons, but mostly because of recent infrastructure investments totaling over $2 billion. Those include projects in Wyoming and out of state, but Wyoming’s growing electricity use factors into how much it has to pay.

The Wyoming Public Service Commission will be considering another rate hike for Rocky Mountain Power. 

The Utility says it would like to raise rates by a total of 50 million dollars to pay for such things as power plant maintenance, rising electricity costs, growth, pollution control and transmission. It is the sixth year in the row that the company is asking for such a hike.