same-sex marriage

commons.wikimedia.org

Now that the Supreme Court has legalized same-sex marriage, conservatives in Congress, including Wyoming Republicans, are debating how to protect religious groups who disagree with the ruling.

Many congressional conservatives fear the Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling will force religious people and institutions to do things against their faith. Wyoming Senator John Barrasso said some are worried about the ruling.

“I think any people of faith always have concerns about anything that comes out that interferes with their belief, religion, and their faith.” 

Wyoming residents say they are not fond of common core, but support for same sex marriage is growing. A University of Wyoming election year survey found that most residents have heard of the Common Core education standards. University of Wyoming Political Scientist Jim King says that 36 percent support common core while 63 percent oppose it. But King says understanding of where common core came from is lacking.

Miles Bryan

Same sex marriage is now legal in Wyoming, which means same sex couples now have access to all the legal rights that come with marriage. Even so, some disparities remain. For one, Wyoming lacks any legal protection for LGBT people in employment. That means gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people in the Cowboy State may be able to be legally married, but they may also be legally fired.

Sushiesque via Flickr

As of yesterday morning, same-sex marriage is now legal in Wyoming. Wyoming Public Radio’s Miles Bryan has been following the story, and he joined Morning Edition Host Caroline Ballard in the studio to break down what’s been going on.

  

Aaron Schrank/WPR

The gay rights advocacy group that has been fighting Wyoming’s gay marriage ban in state court for the past year celebrated the legalization of same-sex marriage in the state Tuesday.

Wyoming Equality’s executive director Jeran Artery stood outside the Cheyenne court house and watched two couples emerge with marriage licenses--and then tie the knot in brief official ceremonies near the court house entrance. 

Artery says this is what his group has been working for.

Former U.S. Senator Al Simpson is appearing is a commercial in support of marriage equality, which is airing across Wyoming, Colorado and Utah.

Wyoming currently does not allow same sex marriage. Simpson not only supports gay marriage but also says same-sex couples should be treated the same as heterosexual couples, when it comes to having or adopting children.

“I have seen the most dysfunctional children come out of a union of a man and wife that I have yet to observe out of a same sex couple," Simpson says.

This week a new statewide public education campaign was launched called Wyoming unites for marriage.  The idea is to get support for same sex couples.  Earlier this year a lawsuit was filed to try and make same sex marriage legal in Wyoming.  Jeran Artery of the group Wyoming Equality tells Bob Beck that the lawsuit seems like the quickest way to get equality.

Same Sex Marriage Supporters Turn Out

Mar 17, 2014

Supporters from all walks of life attended the kickoff of a new statewide education campaign that is intended to draw support for same sex marriage.  Four same sex couples and the “gay rights” advocacy group Wyoming equality filed lawsuit challenging Wyoming’s law that says marriage can only be between a man and a woman. 

Wyoming Equality Chairman Jeran Artery says the issue is important to many people.                

The U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act will not change state laws regarding whether gay couples can marry. But gay rights activists say they hope the ruling will be an important step toward marriage equality in Wyoming.

Jeran Artery with the group Wyoming Equality says after today’s decision, his group is considering several options to try to get gay marriage legalized here.

State Representative Cathy Connolly of Laramie has drafted legislation that would give gay couples the same rights as spouses in Wyoming. 

Connolly says if the bill is passed, couples will be able to register at county clerks offices to become official domestic partners.

“What it does is allow for any place in our statutes where the term ‘spouse’ is used, that members of the domestic partnership have equal rights, duties, benefits and obligations as spouses,” she said.

The bill would also apply to unmarried heterosexual couples.