Senator Mike Enzi

Stephanie Joyce

Congress hasn’t passed an energy bill since 2007, but a bill is winding its way through Congress that has the chance of becoming law.

Earlier this year a bipartisan coalition sent Keystone XL Pipeline legislation to President Obama’s desk only to have it vetoed and the President has continued his battle against climate change. But some are still hopeful that a bipartisan energy bill could still pass. Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis said that she believes targeted legislation might become law and that’s what a bipartisan group has come up with. 

Irina Zhorov of Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming's two U.S. senators are getting behind a new effort to give Governors more power over the EPA. The reason is simple.

It's no secret the EPA has its sights set on the nation's traditional energy sector. In 2012, 39% of the nation's carbon emissions came from either coal, oil or natural gas fired power plants. There's only about 2500 of them nationwide, and the EPA is demanding they cut their emissions or it will have them shuttered. Wyoming's junior Senator John Barrasso says the EPA is forcing the energy industry to make terrible business decisions. 

One of the biggest Supreme Court cases of this term could wipe away the insurance subsidies that tens of thousands of Wyoming residents now rely on under so-called Obamacare. Matt Laslo has the story from Washington on how Wyoming Senator John Barrasso is now scrambling to find a Plan B for a law he's staked his name as a doctor opposing.  

Flickr Creative Commons, User Ron Cogswell

Republicans now control the gavels on Capitol Hill, but last week they were given a stark reminder of how limited their power is here in the nation’s capital when President Obama delivered his State of the Union address where he touted recent economic gains.  

"So the verdict is clear. Middle class economics works," Obama said. "Expanding opportunity works. And these policies will continue to work as long as politics don’t get in the way. We can’t slow down businesses or put our economy at risk with government shutdowns or fiscal showdowns."

Senator Mike Enzi (R)

Republicans now are the majority in both chambers in the U.S. Congress, which means they control all the gavels on Capitol Hill. Wyoming's senior senator, Mike Enzi, gets to wield one of those gavels in the all-important Budget Committee.

Senator Enzi is quiet and unassuming, but his D.C. office is adorned with Wyoming paraphernalia. Today, he’s at his most gleeful, if still subdued, because of his new chairmanship. 

Wyoming’s Republican senators can’t wait to go from being in the minority to the majority party come January. In the new year the GOP will hold all the gavels - and with them, most of the power - on Capitol Hill. But Republicans are still locked out of the White House, which Senator John Barrasso is keenly aware of. He's not happy the president is using his pen on immigration reform or to agree to carbon emission targets with China. 

Charlie Hardy

Facing an incumbent like Senator Mike Enzi, who has been in the U.S. Senate since 1997, is a daunting task. But Democrat Charlie Hardy says he took on the challenge to give better representation to those people in Wyoming without the money or connections to represent themselves, like children, the elderly and working families.

Hardy says these people also have a harder time voting and that could be why in Tuesday’s election, Enzi retained his seat with over 70 percent of the vote.  Hardy is thankful for the voters who did turn out for him, though.

Tuesday night, incumbent U.S. Senator Mike Enzi handily won his race against Democratic challenger Charlie Hardy, taking over 70 percent of the vote. Enzi has served in the U.S. Senate since 1997 and worked on numerous committees including Finance and Homeland Security. While he is considered one of the most conservative senators in office, he’s also given for credit for working across the aisle on many issues. Enzi says he’s signed over 100 bills into law during his tenure in office.

healthreformvotes.org/wyoming

Wyoming lawmakers are asking you to put them back in office on November fourth, but how effective have they been? 

You probably won’t be surprised to hear, this Congress is the least active in the nation’s history. In the past two years, they’ve passed only 181 bills that were signed into law by President Obama. Norm Ornstein, a congressional scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, doesn’t rate it very highly.

“This is an embarrassing and miserable Congress. Really one of the worst I've ever seen.”  

Senator Mike Enzi (R)

U.S. Senator Mike Enzi is facing Charlie Hardy in the upcoming General Election.  In his time in office Senator Enzi has been a key player on issues such as No Child Left Behind and the Affordable Care Act. We begin our conversation by discussing the ACA.

Charlie Hardy

The Democratic Candidate for U.S. Senate says the first words out of his mouth were Mommy, Daddy, and eminent domain. Charlie Hardy says he’s always had an interest in politics and in helping the poor. He did this as a former Roman Catholic Priest and he wants to do this as the next U.S. Senator. He speaks with Bob Beck.

Bob Beck

There's a water war going on in the nation's capital that has Wyoming lawmakers and land owners worried the federal government is soon going to be regulating most every drop of water that falls from the sky.

During the last two elections Wyoming Republicans campaigned on repealing and replacing so-called Obamacare – but House Republicans have yet to vote on a replacement. Matt Laslo has a look from Washington on the debate dividing Republicans in Congress.

Wyoming Senator Mike Enzi

Sep 4, 2014
Diana Denison
wypols.com

This summer there's been a big push by the nation's powerful teacher unions to completely revamp the nation's standardized tests mandated under No Child Left Behind and then revamped with the new Common Core standards. Wyoming Public Radio’s congressional reporter, Matt Laslo, has the story on how the state’s congressional delegation is fighting for the state’s interests on the issue.

Doug Mahugh via Flickr

The federal pot of money that’s supposed to keep local roads and bridges intact may soon be empty, yet lawmakers on Capitol Hill are miles apart from each other. It remains unclear if they’ll be able to bridge the gulf. Matt Laslo reports from Washington on how the Wyoming delegation is weighing in on the debate that’s sucking the air out of Washington this summer.

This week’s Supreme Court ruling on the EPA and its ability to regulate carbon is a mixed bag for Wyoming officials and energy producers. It sets the stakes even higher for Republicans in the state who are determined to derail a pending EPA rule on climate change.  

Like most all things here in Washington these days, the recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of the EPA is being read along party lines. But Wyoming Senator Mike Enzi says it’s not just partisanship. He says your opinion also hinges on where you’re reading.

This week the EPA unveiled a new rule to drastically cut carbon emissions from the nation's power plants. While Wyoming Republicans say it will devastate the economy, Matt Laslo reports from Washington that some experts say their outdated thinking has set the state back in the new energy economy. 

The White House isn't waiting around for this Congress to help it tackle climate change. The new EPA rule will require Wyoming to slash it's carbon emissions by 19 percent. Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis says the state's energy producers are worried. 

www.hsdl.org

The White House is painting a dire picture for every region in the nation - including here at home - if action isn’t taken to combat climate change. But Matt Laslo reports from Washington that Wyoming’s Republican senators still aren’t buying it.

As Wyoming’s appeal to an Environmental Protection Agency decision about the Wind River Indian Reservation’s borders waits for its day in court, U.S. Senators Enzi and Barrasso have drafted a bill “to clarify” those borders.

Cheyenne-native and retired priest Charlie Hardy has announced his bid to run in the 2014 U.S. Senate race against incumbent Senator Mike Enzi.  Hardy says he feels compelled to run because he wants to bring some of Wyoming’s values—like cooperation and respect—out to Washington.   He says his opponent hasn’t done such a good job of representing Wyoming’s values.

“He is a very nice person, very pleasant person,” he says.  “But if you look at the voting record, I think there’s been some voting that hasn’t been very nice and hasn’t really served the people of Wyoming.”

Wyoming’s Congressional delegation is among the most conservative in the country.  That’s according to a congressional report card released this week by GovTrack, a government watch dog website. 

The Wyoming congressional delegation split its votes on the measure to open the government and avoid a potential default.

Wyoming’s senior senator Mike Enzi was one of just eighteen senators to oppose the compromise. In a statement he called the deal "yet another promise to work on the problem tomorrow."

But Senator John Barrasso says the good in the bill outweighed the bad. 

“I don’t think it was a good deal,” Barrasso said. “I think it was important to get the government opened again, get people back to work and to avoid a default.”

Wyoming Republican Senator Mike Enzi helped Texas Senator Ted Cruz hold up the Senate floor for 21 hours as they discussed defunding the Affordable Care Act.

Wyoming Republicans who favor incumbent U-S Senator Mike Enzi have started fundraising on his behalf. This week, they formed a political action committee – or PAC – called “Wyoming’s Own” to rally voters for his re-election.

Wyoming’s Own co-founder Bill Cubin – son of former Congresswoman Barbara Cubin – says Enzi is hard-working and effective, and shouldn’t be replaced right now.

Today, the long awaited ground breaking for the 41 million dollar Wind River Job Corps took place.  The project was first conceived in 2005 and thanks to support of Senator Mike Enzi it finally received federal approval.  It’s the first Job Corps for Wyoming which is the only state without such a facility. 

Sandy Barton of the Fremont County Board of Cooperative Education Services or BOCES spearheaded the effort from the start.  She told Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck that it will have a major impact on Fremont County and the state.

Liz Cheney will challenge Senator Mike Enzi in the 2014 Republican primary.  What are your thoughts?

This week Wyoming’s senior senator, Mike Enzi, was surprised to learn he’ll be facing off against Liz Cheney in what’s expected to be one of the most heated Republican primaries in the nation. Matt Laslo reports from Washington that right now, the Republican Party is wrapping its arms around Enzi. 

Bob Beck / Wyoming Public Radio

Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President and Wyoming Congressman Dick Cheney, formally announced her candidacy for the U-S Senate during press conferences in Casper and Cheyenne.  Cheney will face off against incumbent Mike Enzi in next summer’s Republican primary. 


During a news conference Cheney attacked President Obama and what she called his liberal agenda.  She complained that too many Republicans have compromised with Democrats.

 

Liz Cheney announces bid for Enzi’s Senate seat

Jul 16, 2013
Courtesy Photo

Liz Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, has announced that she will run for US Senate against incumbent Senator Mike Enzi in Wyoming’s Republican primary next year.

Although Cheney has spent most of her life outside the state, the attorney and former Fox News contributor has been in Wyoming in recent weeks, talking with prospective constituents. In her announcement video, Cheney promised to fight for lower taxes and freedom for the private sector, especially the energy industry.
 

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