sexually transmitted disease

Courtesy Wyoming Department of Health

  

Wyoming’s cases of sexually transmitted diseases have been increasing in recent years and a recent update shows that, despite efforts of health care providers, it’s still a concern. Courtney Smith is the Communicable Disease Program Manager for the Wyoming Department of Health. She tells Bob Beck that they have one key area of concern. 

 

Wyoming saw higher rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis and other sexual transmitted diseases in 2015 compared to reports from the previous year, according to recent data released by the Department of Health.

The report shows a 3 percent increase in chlamydia cases and a 150 percent rise in gonorrhea. Young people aged 15 to 24 accounted for a majority of these infections, which health officials say can have lasting health impacts.

Gonorrhea Cases Double

Jul 22, 2015
knowwyo.org

Wyoming health officials say they are seeing a gonorrhea outbreak. They had 61 reported cases earlier this month compared to a total of 31 last year. Half of the cases involve people in their 20’s.

The Director of the state’s communicable disease surveillance program, Courtney Smith, says the problem is that couples are not using condoms. 

Ad Campaign Will Encourage Testing

Mar 13, 2014

An advertising campaign will be used to try and encourage more people to get tested for H-I-V and other sexually transmitted diseases.  The Wyoming Department of Health’s KnoWyo campaign is used to encourage sexually active people to get tested for S-T-D’s.  Spokeswoman Kim Deti says the program has been effective.

“A lot of people who are infected may not realize that they are and the risk there is spreading it to other people.  And of course with public health in mind that’s something we want to prevent, we want to prevent the spread of those diseases.”

Kat M Research

It’s Wyoming’s most prevalent sexually transmitted disease. Known as the silent infection, most men and women that have Chlamydia never show any symptoms. Left untreated, the infection can eventually lead to infertility in women as well as other complications.  

Kim Deti, spokeswoman for the Wyoming Department of Health, says over 2,500 people were diagnosed with Chlamydia in the state last year—nearly 300 more than the previous year.