shoshone national forest

After a decade of work the new Shoshone National Forest plan has been signed. The plan lays out how the forest will be managed in years to come.

Forest officials says it provides multiple use opportunities such as biking and camping while also providing protections for Grizzlies and other key species. 

Conservation groups had wanted Oil and Gas development to be banned, but Lisa McGee of the Wyoming Outdoor Council says she is satisfied with the compromise.                 

Shoshone National Forest

The long awaited Shoshone Forest Plan will be signed into law soon. The Shoshone Forest is the nation’s first national forest. The plan for the forest has been more than ten years in the making.

After forest managers presented a plan last year, that would allow off road vehicles and bicycles to expand in areas that had previously been off limits, several parties objected.

Forest Supervisor Joe Alexander said, “We had 72 objections to our plan.”

114,000 new acres of bark beetle kill has been detected in an aerial survey done by the State Forestry Division for 2014. Most of that is in Bridger-Teton and Shoshone National Forests. 

Les Koch is the division’s Forest Health Specialist and says while warmer weather didn’t help in deterring the Pine, Spruce, and Douglas-Fir beetles, they have already killed many of their suitable host trees. While 2014 did see an increase in acres affected, over the last few years the overall trend has been downward.  

Mixed Reaction To Shoshone Forest Plan

Jan 12, 2015

If you hike, hunt, ride on horseback, snowmobile, or ATV, the new revisions to the Shoshone National Forest Plan may affect you. The U.S. Forest Service announced those changes for the nation’s first national forest recently.  Some people are very happy, and some very unhappy about the changes.

The Shoshone National Forest borders Yellowstone to the east and the south.  It is the nation’s first National Forest.   

Penny Preston

Cody – Grizzly bears, moose, bison, and many other Yellowstone area animals are hit and killed by speeding motorists every year. But now, a baby moose that made newspaper and magazine headlines when it survived a raging river, has been photographed all alone. Locals fear it is orphaned and unlikely to survive, because a motorist killed its mother. It’s led to a renewed discussion over speed limits and signs in forested areas of northwest Wyoming.

A heavy snowpack swelled the Shoshone River this spring.

Olly Moss, blog.camposanto.com

Picture this. You're a park ranger living in a watchtower in the Wyoming wilderness. No cellphone, no internet, no co-worker to keep you company. Your only human contact is with your boss on a handheld radio. But when unexpected events occur, you’re faced with exploring a wild and unknown environment…and that's where a new video game set in Wyoming begins.

Shoshone National Forest Management Plan Questioned

Mar 10, 2014

A new plan governing management and uses of the Shoshone National Forest is set to be finalized soon. But some groups, like the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, take issue with parts of the plan.

Of concern is an increase in motorized use in the Frank's Peak and Wood River roadless areas. Independent Contractor Charles Wolf Drimal says during the Forest's planning process, those areas were identified as having the highest wilderness potential.

After eight years of work, the Shoshone National Forest has released a new forest plan with few changes from the previous plan.  

Winter recreation will remain roughly the same, few areas will be open for oil and gas development, and there will be no new wilderness areas.  Some had asked for increased wilderness protections, but Forest Planner Carrie Christman says they didn’t want to go further.

U.S. Forest Service

Commenters on the proposed Shoshone National Forest management plan favor conservation, according to a new analysis by several environmental groups.

The U.S. Forest Service received more than 23,000 comments on the proposed plan. The analysis focuses on the roughly 1,000 of those that aren't form letters. Connie Wilbert, with the Sierra Club of Wyoming, helped with the analysis. She says the results weren't unexpected.

inciweb

The Hardluck Fire in the Shoshone National Forest has been creeping north, toward a few abandoned frontier cabins near Needle Creek.


Forest Spokeswoman Kristie Salzmann says because other wildfires in the West threaten human life and properties, they take precedent.


“There’s only so many people and so many resources that can be utilized within the country to fight fires. And this one, since it doesn’t have the properties at risk, and because it is in such rugged terrain, we are just staying in the monitoring of it right now.”

A wildfire is threatening some summer homes and campgrounds southwest of Lander.

The homes in Homestead Park and campers in Sinks Canyon were evacuated today as the Fairfield Fire spread in hot and windy conditions in grass and sagebrush. Forest Service spokeswoman Kristie Salzman said about 50 structures were threatened but it's not clear how many of them are homes and how many were occupied.

The area is a very popular spot in the summer, attracting rock climbers, mountain bikers and hikers.

Sleeping Giant Ski area to expand

Apr 19, 2012

The Shoshone National Forest is considering public comments on a proposal to make the Sleeping Giant Ski area near Cody a year-round facility. 

 The Ski area is hoping to take advantage of new federal rules that allow ski areas to operate in the summer months. Forest Service Spokeswoman Anita Harper says the ski area wants to expand in three areas.