University of Wyoming

Wyoming Cowboys saddle up for 2013 season
 

Former University of Wyoming basketball player Luke Martinez has pleaded guilty to misdemeanor battery and is serving a sentence of 45 days in the Albany County Jail. 

 

 

The National Science Foundation recently awarded University of Wyoming assistant professor John Oakey its prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award.  Oakey, a chemical and petroleum engineer, will receive $400,000 to fund a project that will potentially make tissue regeneration experiments much faster, especially when studying diseases such as osteoarthritis. 

UW Trustees request $13M for pay raises

Jul 26, 2013

The University of Wyoming’s Board of Trustees decided Friday to ask the state for $13.3 million to cover merit-based raises for faculty and staff.


Former University President Tom Buchanan tried unsuccessfully to secure raises in the past, and Board President David Bostrom says UW is now seeing an “exodus” of high-performing employees.

UW provost will resign

Jul 26, 2013

University of Wyoming Provost Myron Allen has announced he will resign this fall.

A press release from UW President Bob Sternberg’s office says he accepted Allen’s resignation, which will go into effect on September 1. The release did not offer a reason for Allen's resignation.

Sternberg is asking the UW community and stakeholders to offer input and recommend an interim vice president for academic affairs. He invites anyone to send him an e-mail at uwpres@uwyo.edu.

University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming has not given a pay raise to its faculty and staff in four years now and the board of trustees is concerned that scrimping on salaries has begun to adversely affect the education the university offers.  David Bostrom, the president of the UW Board of Trustees, says that employee salaries don’t just need to compete state-wide but must also compete nationally and internationally within their fields.

This month, the University of Wyoming will host a field course where students will explore the geographic, historical and religious significance of Heart Mountain in northern Wyoming.

Two educators will split the teaching of the course, one focusing on history, and the other on religion. The latter, Mary Keller, is a historian of religions and a lecturer at U-W. She spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez from the Big Horn Radio Network in Cody about what makes Heart Mountain so special.

Julianne Couch is the author of Traveling the Power Line, a book about the many energy sources we tap into for our power needs – from oil and gas, to wind, to solar and uranium.

Couch teaches at the University of Wyoming and has also written Jukeboxes and Jackalopes: A Wyoming Bar Journey and Waking Up Western: Collected Essays. She now lives in Iowa but stopped by the studio to talk to Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov about her book.

Laramie was included on a list of America’s 100 Smartest Cities. It was compiled by Lumosity, a company that makes online games meant to measure and improve the user’s mental fitness. Most cities on the list have research universities there.

Lumosity has a database of 40 million users, and ranked them based on various cognitive skills.

Lumosity Data Scientist Daniel Sternberg says people in Laramie performed better on games that challenged logical, working knowledge, compared with those measuring acquired knowledge.

Sternberg takes the reins as UW president

Jul 1, 2013

The University of Wyoming’s new president, Robert Sternberg, started work today.

He says he’s looking forward to meeting educators, lawmakers, and citizens in Wyoming. And he says he has big plans for the university.

“My goal at UW is to collaborate with all stakeholders to help the University of Wyoming become the top land grant institution in the country, meaning that it will become the university that best educates and develops the ethical leaders who are going to make a positive, meaningful and enduring difference to the world,” Sternberg said.

Historian Phil Roberts at the University of Wyoming recently published a book called “Cody’s Cave,” which tells the story of a vast set of caverns near Cody. The cave was once a national monument, but was then turned over to local control, and Roberts argues that that was a grave mistake, because the site is now just a hole in the ground, off limits to the public. Roberts joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden to talk about the cave, and its demise.

An international conference about mining reclamation ended in Laramie today. The American Society of Mining and Reclamation and the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center hosted the event, which featured technical presentations about reclamation issues as well as policy questions and case studies.

UW professor and director of the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center, Pete Stahl, says there were many Australian and Chinese stakeholders in attendance.   

WSGS study lists potentially abundant rare earth deposits

Jun 4, 2013
swissmetalassets.com

The Wyoming State Geological Survey has released a study showing an abundance of rare earth metals in rock samples from across the state.

Wyoming hosts mining reclamation conference

Jun 4, 2013

Mining industry representatives and researchers are gathering in Laramie this week for the meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation. The last time Wyoming hosted the American Society of Mining and Reclamation was in 2007. Peter Stahl, director of the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center, says the fact that the industry gathering has returned to Wyoming so soon is a testament to the state’s role in the field of land reclamation.

As a graduate student in UW’s Creative Writing Program, LuLing Osofsky was fascinated by the various ways she saw Indian culture present in Laramie. South Asian students celebrated traditional festivals on campus, and the town had a good place to get curry. She writes about experiencing these pockets of India in her series of vignettes called “Wild Wild East: Finding Hints of Asia in the West.”

Kit Freedman is a graduate of University of Wyoming, who did his thesis research on the Wind River Indian Reservation. In this essay he reflects on his family’s multi-generational history in Lander.   

University of Wyoming

Students who earn associate of arts or science degrees at Wyoming Community Colleges will automatically be admitted to the University of Wyoming starting this fall. UW and the Wyoming Community College Commission announced the new policy at Casper College today.
 

A new study shows that the decline in native cutthroat trout has had dramatic impacts on the migratory elk herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. 
 

Lead Researcher Arthur Middleton and others were studying the decline of elk herds in the region, and they determined that grizzly bears were playing a greater role in those deaths than they realized. 
 

The illegal introduction of lake trout into Yellowstone Lake has harmed the cutthroat trout population. 
 

The Dean of the University of Wyoming’s College of Arts and Sciences will retire this summer, after more than 40 years at the University. Oliver Walter came to U-W in 1970 to teach political science, and became dean in 1989. He says he’s seen a lot change during his time at U-W, including growing emphasis on research, more technology on campus, and increasing diversity.  But, for him, a highlight has been the growth of the study abroad program and international relationships.

Now that Colorado State University is planning to increase in-state tuition by nine percent, a University of Wyoming official says that more students might consider U-W as an affordable option for college. 

U-W Vice President for Academic Affairs Sara Axelson says even though Wyoming’s out-of-state tuition will soon increase slightly… the cost is going to be very competitive when compared with C-S-U.  She says they will work hard to point that out to high school seniors.             

Administrator takes down "UW Crushes," apologizes

Apr 26, 2013

Page administers have removed UW Crushes from Facebook.  This follows a public backlash to a post that directed violent sexual language at a University of Wyoming student.

UW Crushes was not affiliated with the university.

The page allowed users to anonymously submit messages about other UW students. Many were vague compliments, but some were sexually explicit or use real names.

Several groups will lead a rally in Laramie this week to combat rape culture. The event called Take Back the Night will incorporate music, dance and poetry to raise awareness about sexual assault and support survivors.

The University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources is working to forge a relationship with Saudi Arabia’s national oil and gas company, Saudi Aramco, and King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals. Saudi Aramco is the biggest oil and gas company in the world and invests heavily in research and development. SER Director, Mark Northam, just returned from a trip to Saudi Arabia. He says Wyoming and Saudi Arabia face similar challenges when it comes to unconventional reservoirs and water shortages, and he says they would both benefit by sharing their resources.

Author speaks to UW

Apr 16, 2013

While many express views on what the founding fathers of the United States intended in documents such as the constitution, few have the expertise to weigh in on that topic like noted historian and author David McCullough. 

McCullough has authored books on 1776 and former President John Adams.  Following a speech at the University of Wyoming, McCullough told Wyoming Public Radio that it’s hard to pin a specific point of view on the founding fathers.

Gov. Matt Mead's weeklong trip to Saudi Arabia last week has succeeded in drawing interest to energy research going on at the University of Wyoming.

As a result of the trip, officials from Saudi Arabia's state-owned oil giant will be visiting UW soon to get a closer look at the research.

UW has been doing specialized research that could have application to extracting oil from underground formations that are tough to tap.

Tristan Ahtone

Native American tribes need to make sure they are protecting their natural resources. Eastern Shoshone Business Council member Wes Martel, from the Wind River Indian Reservation, spoke during a University of Wyoming American Indian Studies program this week. Martel said tribes need to be more careful about the kinds of contracts they enter into for energy development. He added that water is the new gold but very few tribes are taking real steps to secure this resource.  

The University of Wyoming’s Fay Whitney School of Nursing has been chosen to participate in a $3 million initiative aimed at transforming nursing education.  The initiative is called the Future of Nursing State Implementation Program.  UW School of Nursing Dean Mary Burman says the effort is intended to address issues that include health care access, quality and cost.  Burman says in Wyoming, they will look at three key issues.

Incoming President gets ready for UW

Mar 6, 2013

The incoming President of the University of Wyoming says he will be spending the next few months taking a close look at how he can help U-W advance.  Doctor Robert Sternberg says one of his first objectives will be to travel the state and receive public feedback about the University. 

Sternberg says his fresh perspective can bring new ideas to U-W, but he also plans to lean on people familiar with the University as he develops his ideas.  He says this was a successful approach at Oklahoma State University where he is the Provost.

UW announces new president

Feb 26, 2013

Robert J. Sternberg will be University of Wyoming’s next president. The UW Board of Trustees made the announcement this afternoon during a teleconference. Sternberg currently serves as provost and senior vice president at Oklahoma State University.

The trustees wanted to keep finalists’ names secret, but a district court judge ruled that names had to be made public. Some candidates dropped out when the trustees said they would comply.

This weekend, the University of Wyoming’s Board of Trustees interviewed four candidates to replace President Tom Buchanan, who will retire this summer.

The search for a new UW president was originally confidential, to allow candidates to maintain security in their current jobs, but a judge in Laramie ruled that the University must release the names of its candidates to the public. In order to stay on schedule, the Board of Trustees obliged, but not before telling candidates the search would no longer be confidential.

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