worker deaths

Emily Guerin

Dustin Bergsing was a young, fit, bull rider from Montana. On a cold night in January 2012, he climbed to the catwalk on top of a 20 foot tall crude oil storage tank on an oil well pad in North Dakota’s Bakken oilfield. His job was to pop open the small hatch on top and drop a rope inside to measure the level of oil.

Just after midnight, he was found dead by a co-worker, slumped on the catwalk.

Kimon Berlin via Flickr Creative Commons

A contractor died at Peabody Coal's North Antelope Rochelle Mine in the Powder River Basin early Wednesday morning.

The contractor, whose name hasn't been released, died inside a hydraulic scoria crusher around 6 a.m., according to Amy Louviere, a spokeswoman for the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

“The crusher apparently started up and it ultimately crushed the miner,” Loviere said. “That victim was airlifted to a nearby medical facility and he is deceased.”

Louviere says local MSHA officials are on the scene and will be conducting a thorough investigation.

Worker safety advocates and family members gathered in Cheyenne Monday morning to commemorate Workers’ Memorial Day. The day remembers those who have been killed or injured while on the job. 

Dan Neal with the Equality State Policy Center organized the event.

Started it by ringing a bell 35 separate times to remember the 35 workers who died on the job in Wyoming in 2012.”