wyoming

News
6:51 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Land Trust Secures New Easement

The Wyoming Land Trust, a conservation group, has secured a land easement on one of the oldest working ranches in Sublette County.

The Circle Ranch – also known as the “67 Ranch” – has been in the Miller family for more than 130 years. The easement will prohibit building development and subdivision on almost 2-thousand acres of land, which includes elk, moose, pronghorn and sage grouse habitat.

Land Trust spokeswoman Kendall Brunette acknowledges that this easement could limit the case for adding sage grouse to the endangered species list.

 

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Testimonials
2:59 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

WPM Testimonials

“I’ve listened to you since probably the early ‘70’s. To me, it’s a lifeline to reality. You’re intelligent, and you can be trusted, I believe. I depend on you for that. To the day I die, I will be listening to public radio, no doubt.”

Annika

“We have it on, like, all day at my house. My family kind of listens to it together. There are no ads, and that’s really helpful. WPR just helps with letting people know what they need to know.”

Bronwyn

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Open Spaces
6:46 pm
Fri November 30, 2012

State Superintendent Cindy Hill Interview

Cindy Hill Superintendent

State Superintendent Cindy Hill Interview

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Open Spaces
4:28 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Four more years: What a second Obama administration could mean for energy in Wyoming

Many fossil fuel developers campaigned against President Obama this election season, fearing the effect of regulations and other restrictions on their industry, while environmental activists called for four more years. Now that Mr. Obama has won a second term, Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez spoke with some stakeholders about what that could mean for the energy industry in Wyoming.

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Arts
2:37 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Wyoming Artist Profile - Patti Fiasco

Roots-rock band Patti Fiasco is based in Ft. Collins but members are from towns across Wyoming. Fronted by Alysia Kraft from Encampment, they combine classic country, soul, and rock 'n' roll. With their self-titled debut release and a growing fan base, there is no limit to Patti Fiasco's potential. Anna Rader produced this profile.

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News
8:16 am
Mon October 8, 2012

State Treasurer Joe Meyer Dies

The state's treasurer and its longest serving attorney general has died. Joseph "Joe" Meyer was 71.
 
     Meyer's family said in a statement that he died Saturday. No cause of death was released, but Meyer was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2009. He had brain surgery in January to remove cancer deposits.
 
     His death comes just days after the University of Wyoming announced he would receive a distinguished alumni award at homecoming next week. Meyer graduated from the school with a bachelor's degree in 1964 and a law degree in 1967.
 

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Open Spaces
4:05 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Wyoming's Wolf Hunt Begins

Wisconsin hunters set up camp above the Gros Ventre River, where they're pursuing deer but some Wyoming hunters are targeting wolves.
Jennifer Tennican

HOST INTRO: Nearly 3,000 hunters have purchased permits to target wolves in Wyoming's first regulated wolf hunt, which began on Monday. Conservation groups, meanwhile, are preparing to challenge Wyoming's approach in court. As of Thursday, hunters had reported killing six wolves since opening day. Rebecca Huntington has more.

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News
12:51 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Worries about wolf kills

Wyoming residents can now buy a permit to kill a wolf.  But in Teton County, they only need a permit if they're hunting north of Highway 22.  South of that highway, which bisects the county and crosses Teton Pass, anyone can kill a wolf, day or night, for free -- at least for the next two weeks.

That's because Wyoming's wolf management plan classifies wolves as trophy game north of the highway. Trophy game status means hunting is regulated and a permit is required. But south of the highway, wolves are deemed predators so those regulations don't apply.

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News
9:15 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Wyoming's Wolf Hunt Begins

Wyoming’s first regulated wolf hunt begins today. 

As of Friday, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department sold over 22 hundred wolf licenses.  Park County led the sales.  Park County Commissioner Joe Tilden told the Big Horn Radio Network is pleased that the hunt is finally moving forward. 

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Topic of the Week
9:02 am
Mon October 1, 2012

A recent ruling allows for Wolf Hunting in Wyoming. What are your thoughts?

A recent ruling allows for Wolf Hunting in Wyoming. What are your thoughts?

WPM/NPR Community Discussion Rules

Open Spaces
3:46 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

A glimpse into the Cheyenne Concert Association’s upcoming season

The Cheyenne Concert Association started in 1935 as a way to bring a variety of music to community.  Funding for the association comes from the Wyoming Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts and other organizations.  Mary Cox with the Concert Association tells us that their new season begins October 16th at the Cheyenne School Administration building with the group New Odyssey.

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Open Spaces
3:36 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Former Rep. Jorgensen pushes for Medicaid expansion

As you may have heard, Governor Matt Mead is struggling with whether to recommend that the state expand Medicaid offerings.  It would provide federal insurance to more people in the state and supporters say it would save the state health care dollars in the long run.  But the Governor says it could cost the state millions of dollars in up-front costs.  Former State Representative Pete Jorgensen, a Democrat from Jackson, says the long term benefits of an expansion make it worth it.  Jorgensen was a long time member of the legislature’s Joint Appropriations Committee and is pushing state hea

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Open Spaces
3:31 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

After slow start, ‘green’ building begins to take root in Wyoming

Davey Jackson Elementary in Jackson achieved LEED certification.

Over the past few years, a growing number of people in Wyoming have been constructing buildings with an eye to making them more energy efficient. But Wyoming still lags behind the rest of the country when it comes to “green” building. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

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Open Spaces
4:27 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Gov. Mead considers expanding Medicaid

Governor Matt Mead is confronted with the issue of whether or not the state should expand Medicaid services to serve more residents.  It’s a proposal that was included in the Affordable Care Act, but this summer the US Supreme Court ruled that states should be allowed to make this decision.  The argument for doing it is that it would help bring down long term costs of health care, because those who cannot get or afford insurance would be covered under Medicaid.  That should reduce cost shifting.   But there is an expense to the state and a recent study commissioned for the Department of Hea

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Open Spaces
4:24 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Volunteers make EMS possible in rural Wyoming, but numbers are dwindling

An ambulance staffed a team of experienced first-responders can make a world of difference in an emergency. This is especially true in rural Wyoming, where the hospital can be an hour away or more. What many people don’t realize is that most of Wyoming’s Emergency Medical Services – or EMS – workers are volunteers, and their numbers are dwindling. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez filed this report.

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News
6:36 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Counties could face high costs with unregulated subdivisions

A conservation group is urging Wyoming counties to be cautious with subdivisions, because the overall costs might be more than the county anticipated. 

John Heyneman with the Sonoran Institute in Wyoming prepared a report for the Natrona County Commissioners, which says good prior planning and partnerships with city officials can help save counties money. 

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Open Spaces
3:57 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

Drought, hay shortage mean tough economic times for Wyoming ag industry

The creeks that Orville Johnson’s cows would normally drink from are dry this year.
Willow Belden

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says this year’s hay crop will be the worst in decades, because of the drought. Hay is already in short supply, and prices have spiked. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports that the hay shortage is forcing ranchers to make tough choices and could have a lingering economic impact on the state’s ag industry.

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Open Spaces
3:53 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

DKRW secures contract for coal-to-gas plant

DKRW plans to build a coal-to-gas plant in Medicine Bow.
Bob Beck

Earlier this year we told you about an effort to turn coal into gas in Medicine Bow.  Today DKRW Advanced Fuels has announced that it has secured a contract to its Medicine Bow project with the Sinopec  Engineering Group in based out of China.   Bob Kelly is Executive Chairman and co-founder of DKRW, and he tells Bob Beck that getting an actual bid on the facility puts wheels in motion.  

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Open Spaces
3:41 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

Gender wage gap persists in Wyoming

The gender wage gap in Wyoming is the largest in the nation. And that’s not news, either…it’s been this way for years. Groups around the state are working to fix it through policy, training programs, and education, but Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that it could be the state’s industries that keep the gap firmly in place.

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Open Spaces
3:37 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

AFL-CIO discussing worker safety in Wyoming

It’s Labor Day weekend, which means there will be a lot of discussion surrounding workers in the state.  Kim Floyd is the Executive Secretary of the Labor Organization the AFL-CIO.  He tells Bob Beck it’s an interesting time for many workers

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Open Spaces
3:31 pm
Fri August 31, 2012

Carp are thriving, unpopular in Wyoming waterways; can be composted

Janet “Ogre” Chen stalks common carp with a bow and arrow in Wheatland Reservoir #3.
Rebecca Martinez

Wyoming fisheries no longer stock state waterways with carp, but the species is still alive and well throughout the state. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez filed this end-of-summer postcard about her first experience with the common carp… and with bow-fishing.

(Arrow shot into water)

REBECCA MARTINEZ: For the unskilled archer, shooting a carp – even a massive one – with a bow and arrow is no easy task. I learned that first-hand this summer during an afternoon of bow-fishing at Wheatland Reservoir Number Three.

(Arrow shot into water)

MARTINEZ: Nuts!

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News
6:36 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Wyoming ACLU sues over possible rights violation

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit on behalf of a parolee who says he was forcibly catheterized to provide a urine sample.  

Wyoming A-C-L-U Attorney Jennifer Horvath says Parolee Daniel Delaney did consent to testing without search warrants, but he had submitted a breath and blood sample.

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News
6:29 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Wyoming behind schedule with energy policy

Gov. Matt Mead says it’s taking longer than he expected to develop an energy policy for Wyoming.

Mead wanted to have a draft energy policy finished this summer, but he says it’s taking a long time to gather input from all interested parties, including conservation groups, ag groups and the energy industry. Still, he says the finished product will be worth the wait.

“Rather than being reactive and engaging in lawsuits and court battles, let’s work together to find a consensus on where we should go with energy development in the state,” the governor said.

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Elections
7:00 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Legislative races should drive voter turnout

Wyoming’s primary election is Tuesday/today and despite the fact that there is not a high-profile federal or statewide candidate on the ballot, the State elections Director predicts a solid turnout. 

Peggy Nighswonger  says there is interest in a different set of races this year.       

“I think there will be a lot of interest in the legislative races.  We have 15 legislative races where the incumbent is not going to be running. 

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Open Spaces
3:26 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Cheyenne Independent Runs for US House of Representatives

One candidate for the US House of Representatives wants your help to get on the ballot.  Cheyenne Resident Charlie Hardy got into the race after he found it difficult to communicate with our current congressional delegation.  He’s also concerned that the country remains at war.  Hardy wants to run as an independent.  He’s long written and spoken about issues surrounding foreign affairs and has served as a Catholic Priest and missionary.  Hardy tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck that while he opposes the country’s continued war effort, he is not anti-military.

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Open Spaces
3:21 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Ag Industry Encourages Producers to Add Value To Businesses

Kelsey Hostetler dyes yarn by hand at Mountain Meadow Wool Mill in Buffalo
Rebecca Martinez

Wyoming agriculture producers raise and lots of cows and sheep… but they’re mostly sold out of state, where they’re processed and sold as beef and lamb, making big money for outside businesses. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez reports that state agriculture agencies are now encouraging ag producers of all kinds to add-value to the products they already have to keep their businesses competitive, and circulate the money in Wyoming.

REBECCA MARTINEZ: Bessie Zeller and her late husband Clarence took over his father’s Lovell beekeeping operation in the mid-1940s.

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Open Spaces
3:08 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Medicare and Medicaid Forecast

We are joined now by Mike Fierberg who works for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services for the US Department of Health.  He tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck what seniors can expect from Medicare this year, but we start by asking him how competitive the insurance marketplace will be now that the U-S Supreme Court has approved most of the Affordable Care Act.

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News
5:54 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Governor Mead is watching revenue improvements, but recommending cuts

Bob Beck Wyoming Public Media

Governor Matt Mead says he is hopeful that the eight percent budget cuts he requested from state government agencies may not have to happen.  But the governor says he is still considering the cuts, despite signs that the state revenue picture may be improving. 

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Open Spaces
5:27 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Coal production slows, prices drop

The Jim Bridger coal fired power plant has already had to retrofit its stacks with cleaning technology and plans to do more work in the next couple of years.
Irina Zhorov

Coal production and coal prices are down and stakeholders are offering up lots of reasons as the cause, from weather to new policies and competing fuels. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that it’s a combination of all these factors. 

Irina Zhorov: There is no doubt coal is struggling right now. Karim Rahemtulla is the Senior Correspondent for investment blog Wall St. Daily.

Rahemtulla: The predominant trend that’s in the market right now is a slowdown in consumption, directly related to coal, not necessarily other energy sources.

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Open Spaces
5:20 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Former Bush Administration official says EPA is improperly affecting energy market

A Bush administration official has been speaking to members of the media this week about his concerns that the Environmental Protection Agency is overstepping its bounds.   Bud Albright is the former undersecretary for the Department of Energy.  Albright’s main point is that the EPA is unfairly making it difficult for energy companies to operate.  He says they are unfairly impacting the energy market.  He speaks with Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck.

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