wyoming

The congressionally mandated budget cuts called sequestration continue to have an impact on Wyoming. And while the state’s Republican lawmakers say those cuts aren’t having as big of an impact as predicted by Democrats, Matt Laslo reports from Washington that the delegation still isn’t happy with the sequester.

Last year, we reported on a new project to restore sage grouse habitat that’s been disturbed by energy development in the Powder River Basin. The Bureau of Land Management, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and other agencies are participating in the effort.

Restorative justice is an approach to dealing with crime that put the victim of the crime front and center and considers how the offense affected the community, rather than looking at it as an isolated incident. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov has a three part series about restorative justice efforts in Wyoming, starting with a case study.

Restorative justice is an approach to dealing with crime that put the victim of the crime front and center and considers how the offense affected the community, rather than looking at it as an isolated incident. Wyoming Public Radio has a three part series about restorative justice efforts in Wyoming, starting with a case study. To hear Part 3 of the series, click here.

Restorative justice is an approach to dealing with crime that put the victim of the crime front and center and considers how the offense affected the community, rather than looking at it as an isolated incident. Wyoming Public Radio has a three part series about restorative justice efforts in Wyoming.

Wyoming consistently has one of the highest rates of workplace fatalities in the country. Many of these are in the energy industry, though not all. Last year, the state legislature decided to tackle the problem by hiring more safety consultants for Wyoming’s Occupational Health and Safety Administration, or OSHA. Most agree that the change has been positive, but some say more still needs to be done, in order to reduce workplace injuries and deaths. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

To make a reservation for StoryCorps stop in Cheyenne, click here or call 800-850-4406.

StoryCorps, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to recording, preserving, and sharing the stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs, will record interviews in Cheyenne from Fri. July 12 to Sat. Aug. 3 as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour.

A woman who served Wyoming as Secretary of State for 24 years has died.  Thyra Thomson died Tuesday at the age of 96.

She was elected to the office in 1962, just two years after her husband Congressman and U-S Senator-elect Keith Thomson  died of a heart attack.  Thyra Thomson served until 1987.  Thomson was an advocate for comparable worth, equal pay for women and affordable day care.  During a 1993 interview for the state archive’s she noted that wage disparity was a serious issue and tried to work on it.

What do you think about the proposal to improve early childhood education in the state?

WPM/NPR Community Discussion Rules

Willow Belden

Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck spoke with the new supervisor of the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, Grant Black.  Since he started the job a few weeks ago, Black has been dealing with issues ranging from the flaring of natural gas to water contamination.  He says the flaring issue is interesting.

Photo courtesy Arthur Middleton

Since the 1990s, elk that migrate between Yellowstone National Park and Cody have been raising fewer calves. But the elk that stay in the foothills near Cody year round and don’t migrate have been doing very well. A new study looks at why that’s the case. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with the lead author on the report, Arthur Middleton. He says they spent years looking at the elk’s predators and habitat, and how those corresponded to elk pregnancies and overall wellbeing.

Wyoming Public Radio has for years reported that the state is on the verge of a uranium boom. It turns out the state missed the peak of that boom, and is now betting on slower, more conservative growth. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports. 

Wyoming has the fourth fastest-growing population in the nation. That’s according to recent U.S. Census estimates from July 2011 to July 2012.

Statewide, Wyoming's numbers are up 1.6% after a couple years of slow growth following the recession. Senior State Economist Wenlin Liu says Wyoming is experiencing two types of growth.

"That 1.6 percent was over 9 thousand people," says Liu, "And that 9 thousand people, about 1/3 or 3,000 people, was from natural change."

The extent of sovereignty for Native American tribes has long been like a tug-of-war between tribal and non-tribal governments in the United States. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that the issue of sovereignty trickles down to everything, even the issuance of traffic tickets, and lawmakers are moving nowhere fast to fix problems caused by disagreements over self-government for tribes.  

Jennifer has been working in film and video since the late 1990s and has experience in all aspects of documentary production.  Her most recent work is a one-hour, high-definition documentary film entitled The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads. Using varied and compelling characters, the film explores the history of a long-time community "watering hole," the Stagecoach Bar in Wilson, Wyoming

Pinedale singer-songwriter Jared Rogerson has been influenced as a musician from 17 years of bronc’ riding in rodeos. He’s also explored thousands of miles in the remote Wyoming backcountry as a brucellosis biologist for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. His new album, Dirt, was released April 17.

As it addressed issues concerning substance abuse, one thing the state never had were Wyoming specific numbers on the financial impact of substance abuse.  Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck reports that a recent study has found that the cost of alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse is staggering.

BOB BECK:  This is the Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center or WYSAC  today people in the state are being asked about their tobacco use.

“And how old were you when you first smoked at least one cigarette every day for 30 days in a row?  16? All right…”

Is Wyoming warming to gaming?

Apr 26, 2013

For years, Wyoming has been timid when it comes to gambling. But things might be changing. With a casino on the Wind River reservation, an increase in poker clubs and the recent passage of a lottery bill, many are now wondering how far this issue will go. Wyoming Public Radio’s Sara Hossaini has more.

Wyoming is continuing to try and find ways to reduce child abuse in the state.  A new report shows that in 2012 there were 705 child abuse victims. 

Governor Matt Mead signed a proclamation Monday calling it Child Abuse Prevention month and added that the state can do a better job in preventing abuse.  Child Advocacy Centers of Wyoming Board President Lynn Huylar says awareness is a key.

Wyoming has one of the highest rates of suicide in the country … nearly twice the national average. Until recently, efforts at preventing suicide were left up to individual counties. But now, the state is trying a new tactic which they hope will save more lives. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

We’re joined now by BJ Ayers. Not one, but two of her sons killed themselves … and since then, she’s dedicated her life to trying to prevent suicide. She started the Grace for Two Brothers foundation and is now the suicide prevention coordinator for southeast Wyoming. Her son Brett was 19 when he died in 2005.

Aug. 30- Sep. 01- Snowy Range Music Festival featuring Leftover Salmon and Friends with Sam Bush, Keller Williams and Bill Payne, Canned Heat, Roy Rogers, Tab Benoit, BeauSoliel avec Michael Doucet, Reverend Peyton and His Big Damned Band, A.J. Croce,  Soul Rebels,  Susan Gibson,  Jay Shogren, Jalan Crossland,  Billy Branch & the Sons of the Blues,  the March Fourth Marching Band,  Blinddog Smokin' and more. Laramie WY

Social workers play a big role in Wyoming and the month of March honors their work. Kimberly Harper is the Executive Director of the National Association of Social workers.  She tells Bob Beck that like a lot of organizations, they are dealing with budget cuts.

The National Weather Service says spring temperatures and precipitation should be near normal in Wyoming.

But Forecaster Paul Skrbac says that trend might not continue for the rest of the year.

“As we get into summer it looks like the odds increase that it’ll be a little warmer than normal,” Skrbac says, “and potentially a little dryer than normal.”

Skrbac says there’s still a chance that temperatures and precipitation could be average this summer, but it doesn’t look likely.

The National Weather Service says spring temperatures and precipitation should be near normal in Wyoming.

But Forecaster Paul Skrbac says that trend might not continue for the rest of the year.

“As we get into summer it looks like the odds increase that it’ll be a little warmer than normal,” Skrbac says, “and potentially a little dryer than normal.”

Skrbac says there’s still a chance that temperatures and precipitation could be average this summer, but it doesn’t look likely.

The National Weather Service says spring temperatures and precipitation should be near normal in Wyoming.

But Forecaster Paul Skrbac says that trend might not continue for the rest of the year.

“As we get into summer it looks like the odds increase that it’ll be a little warmer than normal,” Skrbac says, “and potentially a little dryer than normal.”

Skrbac says there’s still a chance that temperatures and precipitation could be average this summer, but it doesn’t look likely.

How do you think the federal sequestration will impact Wyoming?

WPM/NPR Community Discussion Rules

One thing everyone is trying to get a grip on is how the federal sequester will impact Wyoming.  Anne Alexander is an economist at the University of Wyoming.  She joined Bob Beck in the studio to discuss this.

A new documentary shows how the construction of the transcontinental railroad helped shape Wyoming into the place it is today.

Producer Tom Manning says the railroad is the reason that towns like Cheyenne, Laramie and Rock Springs exist.

“Without the transcontinental railroad going across Wyoming, of course, there would be no Wyoming,” Manning said. “You know, it was really quite a vast emptiness out there.”

The film will premiere on Wyoming PBS on Sunday, March 10th at 7 p.m.

For Wyoming’s lawmakers, the short legislative sessions are full of long days and myriad issues. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that newly elected legislators have to learn a lot quickly, but they’re taking their knocks in stride.

Pages