wyoming

Jillian Balow is one of three Republican candidates running for the office of State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Balow has worked for late Senator Craig Thomas and current Governor Matt Mead. For ten years she was a classroom teacher, she has worked for the State Department of Education, and currently she is with the Department of Family Services where her duties include early childhood education. She speaks with Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck.

Ed Murray is the last of four Republican candidates for Secretary of State. Murray is a long time Cheyenne businessman who says he is new blood with a lot of passion.

Miles Bryan

Last April Cheyenne’s WYDOT ID Services moved into a new building. Its bigger than the old one, with more staff and faster lines. But it’s also a few miles out of town. There isn’t an easy way to walk there, and, unlike the old building, it’s not connected by bus service. The move probably isn’t a big deal for most Cheyenne residents. But it’s had an outsized effect on some in the city.

Arturo de Albornoz via Flickr

An animal rights group has announced plans to erect a billboard in the Laramie area that depicts a dog locked in a cage. This comes after the news that a child was allegedly kept in a cage in Albany County.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA, plan to put up a billboard will read quote “no one belongs in a cage. Never crate your dog.”
PETA campaigner Matt Bruce says this case is a tragedy.

Olly Moss, blog.camposanto.com

Picture this. You're a park ranger living in a watchtower in the Wyoming wilderness. No cellphone, no internet, no co-worker to keep you company. Your only human contact is with your boss on a handheld radio. But when unexpected events occur, you’re faced with exploring a wild and unknown environment…and that's where a new video game set in Wyoming begins.

Andreina Schoeberlein via flickr

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park have seen a growing number of people operating personal drones inside park territory.

Last week someone crashed their drone into Yellowstone's Grand Prismatic Hot Spring. Park spokesperson Al Nash says the park has struggled to recover the device.

“So far we haven’t been able to spot it. We are actually considering flying an authorized manned helicopter over it to see if we can spot it from the air.”

Last week an employee of Grand Teton issued a citation for drone use, a first for that park.

A woman struck by lightning in the Vedauwoo Recreation Area near Laramie Tuesday afternoon is currently being hospitalized for injuries. Fire Chief Dan Johnson says the woman was climbing higher on the rocks than her six companions when a fast-moving storm descended. He says after the strike she was able to climb down on her own.

“She was able to come off the rocks to meet our ambulance crew down at the ground level so there was no type of a rock rescue or any kind of a rope rescue that needed to be done.”

Flickr Creative Commons

Last week the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia unanimously upheld the Country of Origin Labeling Law.

The law requires that packaged meat and poultry must have a label that clearly states the product’s country of origin. And it must detail how the animal was raised and slaughtered. The law also requires that muscle cuts of meat from animals slaughtered in different countries can’t be mixed in packaging.

August in Wyoming: Stories of nature and wildlife. 

Subscribe to the Wyoming Stories podcast here.

umt.edu

The Joint Travel, Recreation, Wildlife, and Cultural Resources Interim Committee is holding a meeting in Thermopolis tomorrow/Tuesday to discuss two bills that would strengthen state poaching laws. The first bill would make it illegal to knowingly sell, barter, trade, or buy such animals. The second would specify fines based on the economic value of the poached animal.

Bruce Burns is the Committee’s Senate Chair. He said the legislature didn’t come up with the new guidelines on their own, but received input from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

Leigh Paterson

Girls in clunky roller skates whizz past their coach. They're sweaty, rowdy, and covered in tattoos. Gillette's roller derby team proudly represents coal country, as does their name.

"We’re called the Coal Miner’s Daughters, number one because Loretta Lynn rocks!" Katie Buffington, president of the team, explained. "Number two because coal is the main source of income in the area. And we really wanted to get back to our roots, where we come from."

Doctor Taylor Haynes is one of three Republicans seeking the nomination for Governor. Haynes has worked as an engineer, a rancher, and a Urologist. He currently operates a company that deals with health care. He is also a former University of Wyoming Trustee. He tells Bob Beck that one issue that got him into the race is the battles the state is having with the federal government. He says he wants negotiations and not lawsuits. 

American Oil and Gas History Association

There’s an invisible network connecting every corner of the United States. Without it, cars wouldn’t start and lights wouldn’t turn on. At 2.6 million miles, if it were stretched out, it would reach around the Earth more than a hundred times. Chances are, you’ve never noticed it. The nation’s sprawling pipeline network is buried underground, out of sight and out of mind.

Sheryl Lain has been a classroom teacher and has spent the last several years training teachers as an instructional leader. Lain is one of three Republicans seeking the party nomination for State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Lain has spent the last three years working side by side with current Superintendent Cindy Hill. 

Ed Buchanan is one of four people running on the Republican Ballot for Secretary of State. Buchanan served in the Wyoming House of Representatives for a decade and served as Speaker of the House. He’s a former officer in the Air Force and is currently an attorney. He speaks with Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck.

Miles Bryan

In late July President Obama signed the Workforce Opportunity and Innovation Act. The bill is designed to get people with disabilities working in commercial businesses, and get them out of service provider owned companies, known as “sheltered workshops.” State officials here in Wyoming are on board with these changes, but some providers say closing sheltered workshops will leave people with disabilities with few options.

Rebecca Huntington

What do butterflies, pikas and a challenge course have in common? They're all at the heart of the summer camp experience for teens in Kelly, Wyoming. Bordering Grand Teton National Park, Teton Science Schools offers a perfect setting for campers to study and appreciate nature. But as Rebecca Huntington reports students walk away with a lot more.

“Is this one lupine? Oh there's a painted lady, I think.”

Josh Hallett via Flickr Creative Commons

The city of Casper is looking to upgrade its image and raise its profile as a tourist destination. And it’s taking special care to make sure the people of Casper are behind the city’s new brand. 

Last year, the city hired Casper-based firm AdBay to create a re-branding campaign for $80,000. Since then, they’ve been in research mode. Creative Director Shawk Houck says asking Casperites what they think gives their city personality has been key to the process.

WyoLotto

WyoLotto released its list of the approved retailers on Tuesday. Starting August 24th, people won’t have to travel across state lines to buy tickets. Convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores, bars and restaurants across the state will sell Powerball and MegaMillions Tickets, making it the 44th state to do so.

The city of Casper will become the national headquarters for a rare total solar eclipse in the summer of 2017. The event is expected to temporarily double the city’s population. That’s because Casper will be in the middle of the path of the moon’s shadow, which will enter the US in Oregon, cut a swath across the width of the country, exiting in South Carolina.

Sean Ellis via Flickr

A Data Center celebrated the grand opening of its massive expansion Wednesday in Cheyenne.

Green House spokesperson Wendy Fox says Wyoming’s cool climate allows the data center to regulate its temperature only using the outside air.

Green House spokesperson Wendy Fox says Wyoming’s cool climate makes it uniquely suited to the data center’s needs.

Money Blog News via Flickr

Riverton, Casper, and Lander have all seen a wave of prepaid debit card scams in the last few days.

Green Dot Visa cards are debit cards that can be loaded with cash at a convenience store.

Riverton Police Captain Eric Murphy says citizens have been asked to use Green Dot cards to send money to scammers pretending to be representatives of big cash prizes like Publishers Clearing House, or the IRS.

“One local lady here in town had paid $28,000 worth of Green Dot cards to these people.”

A Play Date With Art

Jul 30, 2014

"Into the Arts: A Personal Journey" shares stories of adults in Jackson Hole who are discovering, rediscovering or furthering their artistic talents. In this vignette, Alex and Kay schedule encaustic painting "play dates."

B. Smith via Flickr Creative Commons

For the first time in decades, scientists are excavating fossils from an 80-foot-deep cave in North Central Wyoming.

The cave is called “Natural Trap Cave,” because it’s become the final resting place for countless animals in past centuries—including many now-extinct ones like mammoths, short-faced bears, and American lions.

Julie Meachen is a paleontologist at Des Moines University. She’ll rappel into the cave with a team of 15 others.

The Western Energy Alliance released a report this week on sage grouse protection measures used by the oil and gas industry. Though the report claims that the industry is doing enough to protect grouse, a local conservationist disagrees.

Erik Molvar is a biologist and campaign director with WildEarth Guardians. He says that the Bureau of Land Management’s own research disputes the WEA findings.

Wallpaperslot.com

The Center for Western Priorities has started a new campaign to show political candidates how important land conservation is to voters.

The campaign is called “Winning the West” and includes paid advertisements, a website, and a series of public events across several western states.

Greg Zimmerman is the policy director at the Center. He says the campaign was started after a Colorado College poll showed that voters across the political spectrum voted for candidates who support land conservation.

The face of Wyoming is changing, slowly but steadily, according to Wyoming’s Principal Economist Wenlin Liu, who says the state will continue to see ethnic diversity as people move here to work. There has been a 17-percent increase in all ethnic groups between 2010 and 2013. Meanwhile, white population growth was only a little over one percent.

Liu says minority populations are also keeping the median age lower than the national average by as much as a year.

A New Perspective: Courage And Passion In Photography

Jul 23, 2014

J Stephan Conn via Flickr

A small town in northeastern Wyoming is now on the market.

The town of Aladdin is home to 15 people, and sits on thirty acres near Devil’s Tower. Judy Brengle and her husband Rick bought the town in 1986.

She says being the mayor, store manager, chief of police, and cleaning person over the years has been tough, but rewarding.

‘There are a lot of people who don’t understand how much work it is to keep everything going. But it is a great place to live and a great place to raise kids and living in Wyoming is pretty wonderful.”

Ben Slater

Dakota Dave Hull is one of America’s premier finger-style guitarists. Based in Minnesota, Dakota Dave logs a lot of miles touring, so here’s a composition that fades out like the highway receding in the rear-view mirror.

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