wyoming

Last week, one of the nation’s largest suppliers of fracking chemicals said it would fully disclose the ingredients of its products. But Wyoming’s top oil and gas regulator says until he sees more information from Baker Hughes about the format of its disclosure, it’s hard to say whether it goes far enough to comply with Wyoming’s disclosure laws.

Anna Rader

Armed with an acoustic guitar and a looping pedal, Sheridan’s Ethan Chartier creates a one-man band drawing on rock, funk and jam-band influences.

Bob Beck

For years parents and educators have been looking at ways to improve elementary education. Recently many states, including Wyoming, adopted common core standards that supporters believe will give students and schools goals to shoot for in Math and Language Arts. 

The state is also in the process of adopting other state standards, including a set of controversial science standards.  But as Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck reports there is a growing movement against any standards that are not developed by local school boards. 

Since 2010, homelessness has gone down in most places in the U.S., but not in Wyoming. A national report found that in 2013 Wyoming had nearly a thousand homeless people, up 64-percent in that time. About a quarter of those people are chronically homeless. Now, Casper wants to try a program focused on helping those individuals. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports.

Rebecca Huntington

A slow-moving landslide has displaced homes and businesses in Jackson, and the town has been working to deal with the problem for weeks. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with reporter Rebecca Huntington, who’s been following the situation closely. She says from what geologists have said, the cause of the landslide seems to be a combination of natural and human-induced factors.

Palace of the Governors Photo Archives 050884

Racial diversity is not one of the things for which Wyoming is best known. According to census data, only one-point-five percent of the state’s population is African American. Now, a class at the University of Wyoming is documenting the largely untold history of black people in the West. The class is confronting black invisibility—real and perceived.

Joe Riis

Scientists in Wyoming have recently discovered the longest mule deer migration route that’s ever been recorded. The animals travel 150 miles, from the Red Desert to the Hoback Basin. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with Hall Sawyer and Joe Riis, who have been documenting the migration. Sawyer is a research biologist at Western Ecosystems Technology,  and Riis is a wildlife photographer. Sawyer says he discovered the migration route kind of by accident.

Harry Jackson Trust

The estate of acclaimed artist Harry Jackson is inviting art dealers and collectors from across the country to evaluate Jackson’s life work. It’s part of an ongoing effort to sell the collection that’s housed in Cody.

Several remote communities in the state will be able to receive better internet service in the near future.  Visionary Communications has announced a plan to expand its fiber optic line to connect the towns of Chugwater, Guernsey, Pinedale and Torrington to the rest of the state. 

Stephanie Joyce

They’ve been called the secret ingredient of everything. Rare earths are a group of elements that make much of today’s technology possible, from smartphones to wind turbines to precision-guided missiles. For decades, China has dominated the rare earth market, but amid questions about the wisdom of allowing one country to control the supply chain, a mining project in Wyoming is getting underway. As Wyoming Public Radio’s Stephanie Joyce reports, if the mine opens, it would be only be the second one in the United States and the first new one in decades.

Andrew Link | Winona (Minn.) Daily News

It’s been called miner's phthisis, grinder's asthma, potter's rot. Silicosis is a disease of the lungs that’s caused by inhaling tiny particles of crystalline silica dust, basically sand. Those particles cut the lung tissue, causing inflammation and scarring that make it difficult to breathe.

Cindy Hill Superintendent

Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill is rejecting an offer from the state attorney general to narrow the scope of a court case that has to be resolved before she can return to running the state education department.
 
Hill said Tuesday the state constitution is not negotiable.
 
Hill filed suit challenging a state law enacted last year that removed her as head of the state education department. The Wyoming Supreme Court ruled in January the law is unconstitutional.
 

A Cheyenne businessman is the fifth Republican to announce his candidacy for Secretary of State.  Ed Murray owns a real estate and investment company and wants to use his business experience to update the office of Secretary of State.  Among his goals are to make the position more business friendly.                      

Micah Schweizer

Guitarist, singer, and songwriter Buddy MacDonald is a fixture in the Cape Breton music scene and is no stranger to Wyoming, either. Here’s a song that fits both places.

U.S. Forest Service, Associated Press

Yale forestry researchers say wildfires are getting larger and costlier across the nation. Jude Bayham who spoke at the University of Wyoming Wednesday says that the more development that occurs in wild areas, the more complex wildfires become.  

He says the Rocky Mountain region has seen an increase in such homes and it costs more to protect them when a wildfire breaks out. Homes built in wildlands have a direct impact on a wildfire’s cost and size.

Rebecca Huntington

With the deadline looming to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, healthcare-dot-gov navigators are seeing a surge in people seeking help. Wyoming Public Radio's Rebecca Huntington has more.

"Thanks for your patience, you'll have our undivided attention shortly. Your access to quality, affordable coverage is just a few minutes away."

Lawmakers in Washington are debating whether to export more natural gas to combat Russian threats to cut off its gas supplies to Europe. Our D-C reporter  Matt Laslo has a look at what that could mean for Wyoming’s economy – and environment.

Welcome Torrington and Southeast Wyoming!

Mar 27, 2014

Wyoming Public Radio improves its signal in Torrington, and surrounding areas.  The signal at 89.9, with call letters KEUW,  includes Guerney and reaches into Nebraska, significantly improving Wyoming Public Radio’s signal in a critical part of Wyoming.  Wyoming Public Radio is part of the Wyoming Public Media State Network, which provides three public radio services in Wyoming as well as an online service at wyomingpublicmedia.org. Wyoming Public Media serves as Wyoming’s NPR affiliate.

Anna Rader

Even though he doesn’t like the term, Laramie’s Jeff Duloz is a formidable one-man band, with crunchy guitar and primal kick drum underpinning his simmering vocals.

Ice jams in the Bighorn River have caused flooding, which in turn caused damage to several homes and businesses in northern Wyoming. High snowpack could bring more floods this spring. Troy Staples is the business preparedness manager for the Red Cross in Wyoming and Colorado. He teaches business owners how to be prepared in case natural disasters or other catastrophes strike their businesses. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov spoke with him. She asked why it’s so hard to re-open after a disaster.

Willow Belden

In many parts of Wyoming, it’s impossible to get mental health care. That means residents with mental conditions either don’t get treated, or they have to drive long distances to get services.

But that’s starting to change. Recently, more and more patients have been using telemedicine to get psychiatric care. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

The Tronstad Ranch

Wyoming has a long tradition of sheep ranching.  The first flocks arrived with Mormon pioneers in the eighteen-eighties. By the early nineteen-hundreds there were six million sheep and Wyoming led the nation in wool production.  Now, there are fewer than 400-thousand sheep in the state and competition in the global market is stiff.  But Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards visited one family that believes that—against all odds--the life of the flockmaster is worth keeping alive. 

Unemployment Is Down, But So Is Job Growth

Mar 18, 2014

Wyoming’s statewide unemployment rate fell very slightly from four-point-four percent in December to four-point-three percent in January.  The Wyoming Department of workforce services says most of the state saw improvement from the same time during previous year.  But Economist David Bullard says it was not all good, noting that job growth was slow.

Josh and Susan Anderson - Evanston WY

Mar 13, 2014
Micah Schweizer

Susan: My name is Susan Anderson. I grew up here in Evanston Wyoming.

Josh: My name is Josh Anderson and I also grew up in Evanston.

Josh: It was probably about ten years ago, when I met you, you were always listening to public radio.

Susan: Specifically in the morning.  That's my routine.

Josh: Turn it on in the morning, make some coffee, that kind of thing. And I remember going, ugh, I can't stand public radio.

Susan: Why?

Claire Dunne - Worland WY

Mar 13, 2014
Claire Dunne

My name is Claire Dunne, I live in Worland Wyoming with my husband Richard Dunne, who’s also an NPR listener, and I’d like to tell you story of how we first found Wyoming Public Radio. We moved from a city to a farm in Manderson Wyoming in 1984 and for a year we couldn’t get any NPR reception.

A new report by the American Public Transportation Program shows that public transit use across the nation is on the rise, including in Wyoming.  Jackson racked up its largest ridership ever this winter. Ridership on Cheyenne buses has increased as well. Joe Dougherty is director of the Cheyenne Transit Program. He says ridership has increased about 10 percent a year since 2006 to a high of almost 300,000 people in 2013.  Dougherty says seniors and those with disabilities use the system regularly, and so do others.

Governor Begins His Re-election Campaign

Mar 11, 2014

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead made it official, he is running for re-election.  In his announcement Mead said that he has helped enhance Wyoming’s business climate and has been successful fighting the federal government.  He noted that when he took office the feds were not releasing coal leases.   

Anna Rader

An example of Cheyenne-based Sleeping Cranes’ fragile, poetic music.

Joe Riis

Wyoming has some of the longest wildlife migration routes in the U.S. Animals travel in some cases over 100 miles from summer ranges to winter habitats. Protecting the migration routes is important for maintaining healthy populations. But land managers and other decision makers often don’t actually know where the animals travel. Now, scientists are tracking their routes. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

(Sound of deer walking along streambed)

Courtesy PBS

The Lincoln Highway is 100 years old this year, and Wyoming PBS will be screening a new documentary about it this weekend. Much of what was the Lincoln Highway in Wyoming is now Interstate 80, but parts of the original route are still separate. The film tells the story of the highway in Wyoming. Producer Tom Manning joins us now. He says the Lincoln Highway holds an important place in Wyoming’s history and in the history of the U.S. as a whole.

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