Yellowstone National Park

Public Domain / Max Pixel

Twenty-eight great plains tribes are demanding two different sites in Yellowstone National Park be renamed. The request says Hayden Valley and Mount Doane are offensive because they memorialize a racist and a murderer. But with local government officials opposing the change, it seems unlikely to happen.

Yellowstone National Park is moving forward with a plan to help create new herds of wild, genetically-pure bison across the country.

Steamboat Geyser steaming
Kamila Kudelska

Early Sunday morning, Steamboat Geyser in Yellowstone National Park erupted for the fifth time this year. It erupted for the first time in mid-March.

Kamila Kudelska


Abnormal activity in Yellowstone National Park has some people thinking the end of the world is near. In the past two months, Steamboat Geyser has erupted four times. This is highly unusual for the geyser, which unlike Old Faithful can go years between eruptions. Some believe this means the super volcano that sits beneath Yellowstone will erupt next. But is doomsday really upon us?

Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk
NPS Public Domain

Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk could leave the park. In his first television interview on a possible transfer, Wenk said he prefers to retire in Yellowstone.

NASA Earth Observatory

National Parks and Monuments are preparing for the onslaught of summer tourists, and park officials are hoping visitors will remember these are wild places with wild animals. Yellowstone National Park has already seen two dangerous incidents over the last week.

Chuck Preston

Bear 104 was a female grizzly bear who made her home on the edge of Yellowstone National Park and Shoshone National Forest, near a very heavily used road. As tourists drove to the east entrance of Yellowstone, they would be lucky enough to see Bear 104 and her cubs throughout the years.

Daniel Mayer Via CC BY-SA 3.0

After an encounter with a bison left a visitor with minor injuries, Yellowstone National Park officials are cautioning tourists to give wild animals in the park lots of space.

Charles Preston

When federal protections were lifted for the Yellowstone-area grizzly bear last year, conservation groups quickly got to work to reverse that decision. One of those attempts was recently thwarted when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced they would not restore protections after a months-long review.

Old Faithful gets all the attention, but a geyser called Steamboat is the world’s tallest active geyser. And it’s acting a little odd.

CREDIT GRIZZLY BEAR ON SWAN LAKE FLATS, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK; JIM PEACO

Wyoming is drafting a plan for its first grizzly bear hunt in decades. Conservation groups are accusing the state of not following agreed-upon quotas for how many Yellowstone Grizzly can be hunted.  

The sign at the entrance to Yellowstone National Park
Wikimedia Commons: Guerillero

Last year, the National Park Service (NPS) announced a plan to introduce a five-month peak season entrance fee for 17 of the most visited national parks. But it turns out the change to the entrance fee won’t be as drastic after all.

Under the original proposal, it would cost $70 to enter Yellowstone National Park during the peak season. The NPS said they needed that huge increase because of the park’s aging infrastructure and rising maintenance costs.

Daniel Mayer Via CC BY-SA 3.0

Bison carry brucellosis which causes miscarriage in cattle. Slaughtering bison who wander out of Yellowstone National Park to protect livestock has been a controversial management practice for decades. Superintendent Dan Wenk spoke out on the issue this week.

Bison in Yellowstone
Daniel Mayer via CC BY-SA 3.0


Since the beginning of this year, there have been four criminal acts at the Stephen’s Creek Facility in Yellowstone National Park. This facility is the central hub for the management of the Yellowstone Park bison herd. Bison or buffalo once roamed the American plains in the millions but today about 4,200 exist. 

Amy Martin

The bison population on the outskirts east of Yellowstone has grown over the years as solitary bulls slowly migrate away from the park. Now, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department is proposing the first-ever hunt in that area known as the North Fork to address that. 

Bison in Yellowstone
AMY MARTIN

Two people were arrested Friday morning at the Stephen’s Creek facility in Yellowstone National Park. This is the second arrest in two weeks and the fourth criminal incident at the facility this year.

CC0 Public Domain

An eleven-year-old male grizzly was the first bear sighting of 2018 in Yellowstone National Park. The male was seen in the east-central region of the park.

Yellowstone River
National Park Service

Yellowstone National Park is banning felt sole waders and boots commonly worn by anglers, citing they can carry and introduce aquatic invasive species (AIS). AIS are aquatic animals, plants, and pathogens that rapidly overpopulate, altering natural habitats and making them inhospitable for native aquatic species.

Bison in Yellowstone
AMY MARTIN

Three people were arrested this week at the Stephen’s Creek facility in Yellowstone National Park.

Early Tuesday morning, park officials found two people trying to chain themselves to a structure where bison are held before they leave the facility. Later in the day, park officials said a third individual was found in a restricted area.

Amy Martin

Early Thursday morning, Yellowstone National Park officials discovered 73 bison had disappeared from their pen.

This is the second time in just over a month that bison were intentionally released from the Stephens Creek Facility. The animals had just been captured and put into the facility earlier in the week as part of the Interagency Bison Management Plan. The plan’s goal is to reduce bison population due to the fear of spreading diseases to other species during the bison's annual migration from the park to Montana

Henry Mulligan; https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:American_bison_on_the_National_Bison_Range,_Montana.JPG

A federal judge ordered the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider its decision to deny Endangered Species Act protections for the Yellowstone bison.

 

Bison in Yellowstone
AMY MARTIN

The Yellowstone National Park has initiated a criminal investigation into the release of bison from a quarantine facility. Early Tuesday morning, park officials discovered 52 bison missing. Park officials said the bison were able to leave the containment area through a cut fence, suggesting someone explicitly freed the bison.

 

Yellowstone National Park Emblem Sticker
National Park Service

A coalition of tribal and conservation groups is asking a judge to restore federal protections for Greater Yellowstone grizzly bears, as it also asks the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), to restore federal protections on their own.

Kamila Kudelska

In 2006, Montana granted permission to two tribes to hunt on federal public lands near Yellowstone National Park. This was due to a treaty that was agreed upon in 1855 that includes tribes from the Pacific Northwest. The Yakama Nation is the first tribe from Washington state to join in on the hunt. Those tribal members drew tags in November and recently traveled to Yellowstone to exercise their right to hunt buffalo on public land for the first time.

The sign at the entrance to Yellowstone National Park
Wikimedia Commons: Guerillero

 

Researchers at the University of Montana have found that the proposed hike in entrance fees to Yellowstone National Park will harm the economy of local gateway communities and decrease the number of visitors.

 

The National Park Service announced it is raising entrance fees to 17 popular national parks, including Yellowstone National Park. Officials are suggesting increasing the seven day car pass from $30 to $70 during May through September, the park’s most popular months.

 

US Fish and Wildlife Service

Very few of the elk that winter every year on the National Elk Refuge outside Jackson are making their traditional long migration all the way to Yellowstone National Park for generations, and wildlife biologists are worried they’ll eventually forget the route altogether.

(NPS Photo/ Tim Rains)

Federal officials are reviewing the June decision to take grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem off the endangered species list.

This comes after a court decision prevented the delisting of Western Great Lakes wolves. The court found that the service had not evaluated how delisting the Western Great Lake gray wolf could affect other populations of gray wolves still on the Endangered Species list.  

(NPS Photo/ Tim Rains)

The National Rifle Association and the Safari Club International - a sport hunting group - joined forces this week to intervene in a lawsuit. The groups want to make sure their members are allowed to hunt grizzly bears in the three-state region around Yellowstone National Park but not within the park itself.

CC0 Public Domain

Half of the 12 wolf hunting zones in the Greater Yellowstone area have closed earlier than the December 31 deadline because quotas were already met. Meanwhile, 25 wolves were killed just outside that protected zone where no quotas are enforced.

Wyoming Game and Fish large carnivore biologist Ken Mills said one reason so many wolves are getting shot is that it’s the first hunting season most have experienced in their lives. 

Joe Riis

It’s only been in the last few years that scientists have realized that pronghorn, elk and mule deer are migrating rugged terrain over hundreds of miles to reach the best grazing around Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.

It’s almost impossible to conceive what these animals endure on those journeys. But that’s what wildlife photographer Joe Riis set out to document through pictures.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards talked to him about his new book, Yellowstone Migrations…and how he got into photography in the first place.

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