A new study shows that the decline in native cutthroat trout has had dramatic impacts on the migratory elk herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. 

Lead Researcher Arthur Middleton and others were studying the decline of elk herds in the region, and they determined that grizzly bears were playing a greater role in those deaths than they realized. 

The illegal introduction of lake trout into Yellowstone Lake has harmed the cutthroat trout population. 

Cody to plow east entrance to Yellowstone

Mar 15, 2013
David Koch

The effects of automatic spending cuts or sequestration are being felt in the Cowboy State. Because of the automatic spending cuts Yellowstone has been forced to cut 1.75 million dollars from their operating budget. That has caused Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk to delay plowing operations within the park, a move that has upset some gateway communities and caused others to find a solution. Cody officials have been working hard to find a way to open the East Gate on time despite the federal government. From Cody David Koch has more

Governor ponders sequestration help

Mar 7, 2013

Mayors from communities surrounding Yellowstone National Park are asking the state of Wyoming to help pay for snow removal to help Yellowstone open its roads on time. 

Yellowstone officials say the snow removal has been delayed due to the federal sequestration.  But Governor Matt Mead says he has reservations about using state dollars to pay for federal obligations.    

Winter visitors to Yellowstone National Park may soon get to explore the park on self-guided snowmobile tours, according to the new proposed Winter Use Plan released today.

The plan includes guidelines for how many visitors can enter the park on snowmobiles and snow coaches, and also allows for visitors to tour the park without a professional guide, which is currently required.

However, Park Superintendent Dan Wenk says that participants of non-commercially guided tours will still have to meet minimum standards.

2012 has been the worst fire year on record for Wyoming, according to the Wyoming State Forestry Division.

State Forester Bill Crapser says there’s been more fire activity, and fires have been larger and more extreme than ever before.

“Statewide, the only year that we came close to the same amount of acreage would have been way back in 1988 with the Yellowstone fires,” Crapser said.

The holiday weekend is expected to be hot and dry, so Crapser warns that anyone recreating outside should be exceptionally careful not to start fires.

Yellowstone National Park will host a climate change educational workshop for teachers this month.

During the four-day workshop, a representative from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will explain how climate change works, and rangers will talk with teachers about where Yellowstone is seeing impacts, including increased wildfire activity and threats to pika habitat.

Katherine Chesson worked with the parks Climate Challenge, which runs similar programs in parks around the country.

Listen to the interview

This week Yellowstone National Park has held a series of meetings discussing its new proposed winter use plan.  Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk joins Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck and they discuss the fact that after several years of reduced numbers, more snowmobiles may soon be allowed in Yellowstone.

Wild West Balloon Fest - Cody (& Region)

Jun 27, 2012
Daryl Hunter

The Wild West Balloon Fest draws ballooners from all over the country for a unique festival and competition set in a breathtaking arena. Balloons launch at dawn from a grass covered city park. The public is most welcome to mingle with the pilots and crews-indeed volunteers are welcome to help the crew. The pilots can instruct you on the spot for a new experience and a grand adventure. This is a small, relaxed rally. Safe, conservative flying is their hallmark, fun is the goal.

Rebecca Martinez

After a peaceful quarter century, bears in Yellowstone National park killed two visitors last summer. Now, park officials are adamantly warning visitors to forget the sense of security they feel at zoos and amusement parks because Yellowstone is a wild place. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez reports.

It’s Memorial Day Weekend, which means National Parks and forests in the state are gearing up for a flood of tourists. But in northwest Wyoming, the Game and Fish Department is urging visitors to be Bear aware while enjoying the outdoors.

Jackson Game and Fish Spokesman Mark Gocke says people should hike in groups, when possible, and make a lot of noise to alert wildlife of their presence. Gocke says some bears seem to ignore visitors, but Gocke warns visitors never to approach a bear, no matter how harmless it seems.

Government officials plan haze a large herd of migrating bison back into Yellowstone National Park this week - an annual event that is again drawing opposition from wildlife advocates and American Indian groups.

Montana state veterinarian Marty Zaluski says an estimated 400 bison are outside the park in the West Yellowstone area. Government workers could start driving the animals back into Yellowstone using a helicopter as early as Wednesday.

Hundreds of bison leave the park annually during winter to graze at lower elevations.

Yellowstone National Park and the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee have released the results of their investigation into a fatal August 2011 bear attack.

Two hikers exploring the Mary Mountain Trail in Hayden Valley last August discovered the mauled body of 59-year old John Wallace of Michigan. Following several months of investigation, two reports released today confirmed that Mr. Wallace died from traumatic injuries following a bear attack.

The Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and Cultural Resources Interim Committee has passed a final draft of a wolf management plan. The state must maintain no fewer than 10 breeding pairs or a hundred individuals and would protect wolves in Yellowstone and the Wind River Reservation, designate them as trophy game in parts of the Western Mountains, and allow people to shoot them on sight in the remaining 85 percent of Wyoming.

Beginning Thursday, the National Park Service will call on the public to give its feedback on their latest ideas for winter use of Yellowstone Park. This is part of the Supplemental Impact Statement which will help inform the final winter management plan expected to be ready by December of this year. The most controversial part of the proposal deals with reduced snowmobile numbers. It would require that all snowmobiles be guided and that only between 110 and 330 will be allowed inside Yellowstone.  Cody Chamber Director Scott Balyo says he would like to see substantially more  allowed.

Yellowstone National Park

Officials at Yellowstone National Park are seeking public comment on a draft report about threats the park is facing, as well as progress made addressing those threats.

The report was prompted by the UN's World Heritage Committee after the park became a UNESCO world heritage site in 1978.

Al Nash is a spokesperson for Yellowstone. He says the World Heritage Committee put the park on its list of endangered places in 1095, when a plan to mine gold in an area adjacent to the park was to resume… but, when that plan was scrapped, Yellowstone was removed from the list.

One of five scientists retained by the federal government says he sees shortcomings in Wyoming's proposed wolf management plan.

While four of the scientists generally approved of the plan, wolf researcher John A. Vucetich of Michigan says it's vague on how to reconcile conflicts between wolves and elk and may overestimate the mortality wolf populations can sustain.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service retained the five scientists to evaluate Wyoming's wolf plan.

Yellowstone National Park officials say an agreement with neighboring Montana that limits wolf hunting along the park's northern border is protecting the park's wolves from excessive hunting.

Yellowstone wolf biologist Doug Smith said Wednesday that Montana's 2011-12 wolf season so far has had less impact than the inaugural hunt in 2009. That year hunters killed four wolves from Yellowstone's Cottonwood pack, which had been studied for years by scientists and was popular among wolf watchers from across the country.

Scientists say in a new study that the return of gray wolves has dramatically altered the landscape in portions of Yellowstone National Park, by curbing foraging elk herds that prevented new aspen, willow and cottonwood trees from taking root.

Study author William Ripple from Oregon State University said tree stands are expanding in areas where for decades dense elk populations prevented new growth.

Wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone in 1995 and 1996 after being killed off early last century. About 100 now roam the park and elk numbers have dropped sharply.

The National Park Service is seeking public comment in how to manage wildfires in Yellowstone National Park.

The park has undertaken an effort to update its fire management plan to reflect recent changes in federal fire policy.

The Park Service is accepting public comments on identifying what issues should be considered in the environmental review of any proposed changes.