Satellite Outages

Wyoming Public Radio is experiencing network-wide satellite outages interrupting broadcast signals in some parts of the state. Engineers are addressing the issue.

Top Stories

Aaron Schrank

Fort Washakie Stories Part V: Graduation Day

Fort Washakie High School is a small, struggling school on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The students there have been pushing towards one major goal: graduation. And, today, as part of our series on the school, we’ll hear some of those students cross the finish line. As family and friends file into the Fort Washakie gymnasium, the class of 2015 is outside posing for a final group photo. English teacher Mike Read offers a quick pep talk as he snaps his camera shutter. “I want you guys to...
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National Park Pass Drawing

Calling all outdoor enthusiasts and adventurers! Win a pass to the nation’s 2,000 national parks and wildlife refuges. This drawing will have two winners.

Stephanie Joyce

In the latest sign of a struggling US coal market, one of Wyoming’s largest coal producers has failed a financial test from the state.

Alpha Natural Resources owns several large coal mines in the Powder River Basin. Mining companies in Wyoming are typically required to post bonds assuring regulators they can reclaim or clean up the mines when they’re abandoned. But under a provision called “self-bonding,” companies meeting certain financial criteria don’t actually have to put up the money. 

  Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction Jillian Balow was part of a delegation of U.S. state schools chiefs who visited China this month to discuss education issues.

The trip was paid for by the Council of State School Officers and was the third dialogue of its kind.

Bob Beck

Secretary of Interior Sally Jewel came to Cheyenne to announce a massive plan to conserve Sage Grouse habitat in several western states. Wyoming started its own conservation efforts in 2007 and Jewel says it is a model state. The question is whether the federal efforts can keep the Sage Grouse from being placed on the endangered species list. 

Bill Stevenson / Creative Commons

Part 1 in our Inside Energy series Blackout: Reinventing The Grid.

It was a blustery, cold January day in 1998 when the rain turned to ice. I was nine years old at the time, living in a town called Canton in upstate New York, near the Canadian border. The storm started early, but didn’t get serious until well after dark.

“I remember waking up in the night and hearing explosions outside,” my mom, Lynn Shepherd, recalled recently. “When the top of a tree comes off and it just splinters, the snapping is really an explosion. It’s like a gunshot.”  

Dan Boyce

Part 2 of an Inside Energy series Blackout: Reinventing The Grid

Bill LeBlanc hits the streets with a video camera every year to chat energy with average Americans, in different cities around the country, starting with the basics like “what exactly is electricity?”

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Media

Part 3 of an Inside Energy series Blackout: Reinventing The Grid

On an overcast Florida afternoon five years ago, standing in front of a vast array of solar panels, President Obama pledged to modernize the nation’s power grid. He compared its current state to the road system before interstate highways. “It was a tangled maze of poorly maintained back roads that were rarely the fastest or the most efficient way to get from point A to point B,” he said.

Miles Bryan

Six years ago Charlene Southworth discovered something no parent wants to think possible: her fifteen-year-old son, Chris, had molested his younger brother.

“It was disturbing to me,” she said while sitting on the couch in her Cheyenne home. “I didn’t want to hear it.”

Irina Zhorov of Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming's two U.S. senators are getting behind a new effort to give Governors more power over the EPA. The reason is simple.

It's no secret the EPA has its sights set on the nation's traditional energy sector. In 2012, 39% of the nation's carbon emissions came from either coal, oil or natural gas fired power plants. There's only about 2500 of them nationwide, and the EPA is demanding they cut their emissions or it will have them shuttered. Wyoming's junior Senator John Barrasso says the EPA is forcing the energy industry to make terrible business decisions. 

University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming school year recently came to a close and we asked UW President Dick McGinity to stop by and tell us about the state of the University. McGinity discusses stability, hiring, tuition, and enrollment in a wide-ranging interview with Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck.  

At least one of the 15 plans released this week by the Bureau of Land Management has environmentalists concerned. The plan—covering Wyoming’s Bighorn Basin—is drawing criticism from some environmental groups that say it doesn’t do enough to protect three especially wild regions in the basin. Wyoming Outdoor Council spokeswoman Julia Stuble says the plan needs to adopt a stronger “look before leasing” approach to make energy development decisions on a case-by-case basis.

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Topic Of The Week

What is the impact of removing controversial subjects from the K through 12 curriculum?

Open Spaces

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Wyoming Exhibits Sculptures By Chinese Dissident Artist Ai Weiwei

The dragon, the monkey and the tiger: Not the animals you expect to see gracing the wide-open spaces of Wyoming. But you can now see these creatures, along with other Chinese Zodiac animals perched above the National Elk Refuge. Rebecca Huntington reports on a major international exhibit on display in Jackson. REBECCA HUNTINGTON: Outside the National Museum of Wildlife Art, a crane lifts the bronze head of a pig up off the ground. Then workers step in to guide the giant lollypop-shaped...
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Gear Up For Summer Festivals In Wyoming

Get ready for a summer filled with music! There's quite a variety of Wyoming music festivals throughout the state and we've got you covered.

Arts & Culture

Patrick Dobson

Patrick Dobson Reads From "Canoeing the Great Plains: A Missouri River Summer"

Patrick Dobson has lived most of his life on the fringes of the Great Plains. His second book, Canoeing the Great Plains: A Missouri River Summer, was published this year with the University of Nebraska Press. His first book, Seldom Seen: A Journey into the Great Plains, was published to critical acclaim in 2009. He earned a Master’s degree from the University of Wyoming in 1993 and a doctorate in History and American literature from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2013. He is a...
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Travel The World & Support WPR

Explore your favorite destinations while contributing to your favorite radio station! Choose from countries all around the world or National Parks in your backyard.