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Obama's Clean Power Plan Visualized

The Obama Administration announced final rules Monday for its plan to limit carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. While some concessions were made to critics, the final rules actually increase the carbon cuts demanded from states and will have long-lasting impacts on the way power is produced. The White House previewed the announcement on Sunday with a video narrated by President Obama. “Our climate is changing,” the President said, speaking more explicitly about climate change than in the...
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Leigh Paterson

The Wyoming Democratic Party is praising the President’s clean power plan calling it an attempt to slow the effects of climate change. 

Party Vice Chairman Bruce Palmer says he’s hopeful that industry and state policy leaders will stop fighting solutions to climate change and focus on ways to address carbon emissions and develop renewable energy. 

Aaron Schrank

The City of Riverton will hold a peace march this Saturday to celebrate tolerance and equality in the wake of the shooting of two Native American men by a white city parks worker last month.

Both victims were sleeping inside the Center of Hope detox center when they were attacked. James "Sonny" Goggles, Jr., 50, was seriously injured and Stallone Trosper, 29, died.

The event was organized by Ron Howard, an enrolled member of the Northern Arapaho Tribe who teaches preschool on the Wind River Reservation.

Flickr Creative Commons

After months of public debate, Governor Mead released a revision of his so-called sage grouse executive order. The plan is required to undergo review every five years.

Brian Rutledge is Vice President of the National Audubon Society and served on the governor’s sage grouse team. He says he’s happy with how many of the team’s recommendations the Governor incorporated in the revision.

The ability to store energy could revolutionize the way we make and use electricity. But for many utility companies and regular folks, energy storage is still way out of reach. It's expensive — sometimes more expensive than building out old-fashioned infrastructure like power lines and power plants.

For people like Jim and Lyn Schneider, their decision to invest in battery storage came four years ago when they moved to central Wyoming.

Obama's Clean Power Plan Visualized

22 hours ago
Inside Energy

The Obama Administration announced final rules Monday for its plan to limit carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. While some concessions were made to critics, the final rules actually increase the carbon cuts demanded from states and will have long-lasting impacts on the way power is produced.

The White House previewed the announcement on Sunday with a video narrated by President Obama.

The Obama administration released sweeping environmental regulations today. The first-ever nationwide standards to regulate emissions from power plants are even more ambitious than expected.

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Radio

Amid a devastating industry-wide downturn, one of the largest coal producers in the U.S. has filed for bankruptcy. 

Coal-giant Alpha Natural Resources has been in poor financial health for some time. The company acknowledges contributing factors like increased competition from natural gas and an oversupply in the global coal market. But Alpha puts much of the blame for its bankruptcy on environmental regulations that it says are causing electric utilities to shut down coal-fired power plants.

Sturgis Rally Impacts Cody

Aug 3, 2015
Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

The 75th Sturgis Rally may draw a million bikers to South Dakota the first week of August. Thousands ride through Cody, Wyoming. Why? They like to tour Yellowstone on the way.

Cody city streets are lined with motorcycles. The bikers are spending money in bars, restaurants, hotels, the museum complex and night rodeo. But there are other impacts too.

Phil Farman is the Cody area supervisor of the Wyoming Highway Patrol. He said there’s more traffic, and that leads to accidents.

The Riverton Police Department will soon hire a staff member to investigate claims of race-based discrimination.

The person hired for the position will not be a police officer, but will work closely with police when conducting investigations, says Riverton police chief Mike Broadhead.

“I see this as a position to serve as an educator,” he says. “To help people who have been victims of bias to have an outlet that is healthy and to make them feel like they don’t have to go home frustrated. I want to give them a voice.”

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Topic Of The Week

Following the release of the Clean Power Plan, what role should renewable energy play in Wyoming?

Open Spaces

Miles Bryan

The Governor's On The Phone, He Wants You To Move Back

Blake Dahlinger is a 33 year old musician. He lives in Los Angeles, but he grew up in Rawlins. “It was obviously a small town,” he says. “But it was a really great place to grow up.” The thing is, Dahlinger’s brand of frenetic punk rock didn’t get much play in Rawlins. So he did what a lot of Wyoming kids do: he finished school and moved away to a big city. This sort of move is fairly common: young people who grew up in rural areas move away from home at a rate three and half times higher...
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Gear Up For Summer Festivals In Wyoming

Get ready for a summer filled with music! There's quite a variety of Wyoming music festivals throughout the state and we've got you covered.

Arts & Culture

David Swift

Jackson Hole Community To Create New Sculpture

The Jackson Hole community is invited to collaborate with artists on a new piece of public art. Materials are being gathered from different protected lands around Jackson to form a sculpture. Jackson Hole Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews says the project is called FoundSpace. “The idea behind FoundSpace is really reaching out to people to connect to finding space, finding space via time, finding space out in nature, finding space in the open spaces. And really also, the treasures...
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British Landscapes & Downton Abbey Tour

Explore your favorite destinations while contributing to your favorite radio station! Celebrate season 6 and the end of Downton Abbey with a trip to Britain.

Inside Energy

INSIDE ENERGY: Military Marches Forward With Microgrids

The aging United States electricity grid is facing an increasing number of threats, ranging from severe weather events, to solar flares, to cyber terrorism. Inside Energy research found that major power outages have doubled every five years since 2000. It’s something the U.S. military is taking seriously. They're helping to lead the way in the development of smaller and more secure grids – known as microgrids. Ramon Crockett is a supply specialist at Fort Carson Army Base near Colorado...
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