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Leigh Paterson / Inside Energy

INSIDE ENERGY: Coal Country Worries About Series Of Regulations

Over two decades ago, Wyoming surpassed Kentucky as the country’s number one coal producing state and has kept that title ever since. The steady and sharp increase in demand for the state’s comparably cleaner coal wasn’t due to obvious factors, like market forces or labor costs. It was brought on largely by federal environmental regulations. And now a series of new regulations are changing the industry even more. Inside Energy’s Leigh Paterson reports. Residents, lawmakers and workers in...
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Topic Of The Week

What can Wyoming schools do to prepare students for tech jobs?

Aaron Schrank

One week after the most recent death at UW, Animal Science Professor Dan Rule is in the Student Union with 20 others discussing symptoms of depression and warning signs for suicidal thinking. Rule says he’s here because he cares about his students.

“I don’t care if they’re an 18 or 19-year-old, or if they’re a 40-year-old non-traditional student or even if they’re a veteran,” says Rule. “They’re my kids when they’re in my room.”

Miles Bryan

Janell Hanson and her son Adrien live in a sunny house just steps away from the historic Ivinson Mansion in Laramie. Their house is gorgeous--it’s actually older than the mansion. But on the day WPR visited, the beautiful oak front door was marred by a hole in its stained glass panel, temporarily sealed with duct tape. The subject came up near the end of the interview. Adrien confessed the damage happened after a fight with his mother. But, he explained, he had meant to shut the door with care. “The air pressure outside blew the door shut,” he said.

Wikimedia Commons

With federal highway funding once again facing uncertainty, Wyoming officials have already had to postpone transportation projects. Matt Laslo reports from Washington on how Wyoming’s all Republican delegation is trying to do to shore up the program.

The new Chairman of the Wyoming Republican Party is Matt Micheli. Micheli is the son of former state gubernatorial candidate and legislator Ron Micheli. He takes over the job following some infighting within the party that included concerns over legislative action surrounding former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill. Micheli not only wants to help settle things down between the moderate and conservative wings of the party, he also hopes to continue to get more young people involved in party politics. Micheli is in his 30’s and he hopes his presence will help.

Leigh Paterson / Inside Energy

Over two decades ago, Wyoming surpassed Kentucky as the country’s number one coal producing state and has kept that title ever since.  The steady and sharp increase in demand for the state’s comparably cleaner coal wasn’t due to obvious factors, like market forces or labor costs. It was brought on largely by federal environmental regulations. And now a series of new regulations are changing the industry even more. Inside Energy’s Leigh Paterson reports.  

Credit National Sexual Violence Resource Center

April is sexual assault awareness month, and  here in Wyoming a new law now offers stricter protections for victims. Becca Fisher is the Executive Director of Laramie’s SAFE project – a crisis center for victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault. She talked with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard about the progress and challenges still facing sexual assault awareness in the state.

Annie Leibovitz via David Solomon

Next week award winning author Andrew Solomon will speak at the University of Wyoming about his book "Far From the Tree" where he presents stories from parents who have raised children in a variety of circumstances. Some are gay, some have schizophrenia, some are dwarfs, some have autism, others are profound. Solomon interviewed these parents and others about the challenges of raising these children and how love prevails. He says diversity unites us all. Solomon says writing the book also helped him become a better parent.

Rebecca Huntington

Staying globally competitive by teaching future generations of workers how to innovate is a national concern. At Jackson Hole High School, a new program is teaching students the skills they will need to be innovators by assigning them real problems to solve.  

SAMMIE SMITH: So just watch for splinters, we're going to back out this way...

Melodie Edwards

Wyoming lawmakers may not have agreed on much this legislative session but there is one issue they did vote together on: de-regulating the state's locally produced foods. The new Food Freedom Act now allows consumers to buy processed produce, poultry, eggs and unpasteurized milk direct from the cook or farmer, something that was illegal just a few months ago. And it's that last item—raw milk—that's so controversial nationwide.

The Northern Arapahoe Tribe and Wind River Casino have donated ten thousand dollars for the Center of Hope in Riverton.

The Center of Hope offers observation, a detox program, and up to 3 months of transitional living to people with substance abuse problems. Clients experience things like morning meditations, group therapy, and skills for coping with loss.

Center of Hope representative Shelley Mbonu says the money donated by the tribe and casino will go toward things like transporting people to treatment programs or getting assessments.

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