New Podcast: The Modern West

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Jackson Hole Mountain Resort / Instagram

Christmas In July? Low-Pressure System Brings Rare Snow To The Tetons

A low pressure system that moved through Wyoming Monday brought some strange weather, including strong winds statewide and snow in the upper elevations in the Tetons. Gusts nearing 70 miles per hour were recorded in the Jackson area, and windy conditions fueled wildfires in Natrona and Sweetwater Counties. Dave Lipson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Riverton, says this kind of weather is more typical of September or October. "Kind of standalone anomaly, we’re going to...
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Jackson Hole Mountain Resort / Instagram

A low pressure system that moved through Wyoming Monday brought some strange weather, including strong winds statewide and snow in the upper elevations in the Tetons.

Gusts nearing 70 miles per hour were recorded in the Jackson area, and windy conditions fueled wildfires in Natrona and Sweetwater Counties.

Dave Lipson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Riverton, says this kind of weather is more typical of September or October.

Aaron Schrank/WPR

Thanks to the Pope’s environmental encyclical, some Wyoming Catholics are studying big issues like global climate change for the first time. Laramie’s St. Paul’s Newman Center is hosting a 4-week course this summer to dig in to the document.

Forest fire activity has been among the worst on record across much of the West this summer, but it should be a typical fire season here.

State Forester Bill Crapser says that’s because of the unseasonably rainy weather Wyoming saw in June and July.  Crapser says Wyoming’s fire season has started to pick up, but he doesn't expect things to get out of control.

Conservationists are lamenting the hunting and killing of a well-known lion from western Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park.

The black-maned lion, named Cecil, was 13 years old and had become popular among tourists from around the world.

Peabody Energy / Wikimedia Commons

Peabody Energy suspended its shareholder dividends Tuesday after announcing a $1 billion dollar second quarter loss—the latest in a streak of bad earnings reports.

Peabody is the world’s largest coal miner, with operations in Australia and across the US. Like many of its peers, it's been hammered recently by low natural gas prices, slumping demand for metallurgical coal and uncertainty surrounding new environmental regulations.

Leigh Paterson / Inside Energy

Wyoming’s largest utility pledged Monday to cut its carbon emissions and invest in renewable energy.

Wikimedia Commons

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is monitoring Sage Grouse for signs of West Nile Virus. The disease, carried by mosquitos, has a high mortality rate for the bird.

Tom Christiansen, the Department’s Sage Grouse Program Director, says keeping tabs on what kills Sage Grouse is always important, but it’s crucial as the September Deadline approaches for federal officials to decide whether to list Sage Grouse as endangered.

Aaron Schrank

Ryan Reed loves rodeo. And each July, he makes a pilgrimage here, to the so-called “Daddy of ‘Em All” in Cheyenne.

“You just feel like you’re on hallowed ground when you’re here.” Reed says.

Roaming the Frontier Days midway, this amateur steer wrestler and calf roper is like a kid in a candy store. 

“Yesterday, during the bareback bronc, I actually got some dirt flung on me,” says Reed. “I really felt like I’d been hit by some special dirt or something. That’s just kind of the feeling I have about the place.”

Aaron Schrank

The rodeo may be the best-known competition at Cheyenne Frontier days, but outside the arena there is another group of skilled professionals vying for glory. Carnival games operators leverage years of practice and skill to convince people like you to pay cash for the opportunity to win a push, stuffed prize. For many of them, it's not just a job: it's a way of life. Wyoming Public Radio’s Miles Bryan spent time with a few of these games operators and has this postcard.

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Aaron Schrank

Cheyenne Frontier Days' Indian Village Showcases Living Tradition

The very name ‘Frontier Days’ is meant to conjure up images of the old West. And that includes Native Americans, who have been a part of Cheyenne Frontier Days pretty much from the beginning. The North Bear Singers and Little Sun Drum and Dance Group, from the Wind River Indian Reservation are the main attraction this year, occupying the arena at the center of the Indian Village. It’s ringed by vendors selling traditional—and not-so-traditional—crafts. Bead worker Jim Howling Wolf says...
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Gear Up For Summer Festivals In Wyoming

Get ready for a summer filled with music! There's quite a variety of Wyoming music festivals throughout the state and we've got you covered.

Arts & Culture

Wyoming Public Media

Morning Music Live From Cheyenne Frontier Days: Part 2

Morning Music's last day at Cheyenne Frontier Days was a success! Take a look at the second day of Morning Music's live show, playing tunes at Old Frontier Town. We ended a busy and western filled week with live music from Sheridan Country band Tris Munsick and the Innocents. We had a great time meeting listeners, members, the tourists for CFD, and residents of Cheyenne. See ya'll again next year! Check out our videos from the event: Morning Music LIVE from #CheyenneFrontierDays with country...
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Inside Energy

Leigh Paterson / Inside Energy

We Can Send A Probe To Pluto, But Energy Storage Remains Elusive

For Jim and Lyn Schneider, the decision to invest in $50,000 worth of solar panels and battery storage was easy. There were no power lines near their property. After buying land in a remote area near Alcova, Wyoming, their utility company estimated it would cost the couple around $80,000 to get electricity in their new home. "It's like wow, we’re gonna have to be really primitive! We're gonna be cooking on a campfire! We're gonna have to really like each other," Lyn Schneider said between...
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