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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Wed July 11, 2012

JPMorgan Will Move To 'Claw Back' Millions From Execs Who Bungled Billions

Another kind of claws at work. Meanwhile, JPMorgan is going to see if legal steps will let it "clawback" some money paid to executives.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 8:20 am

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon predicted this would happen: The bank "plans to reclaim millions of dollars in stock from executives at the center of the trading blunder that shocked Wall Street," The Wall Street Journal reports

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Holy Cow! Family Finds Baseball Card Collection That May Fetch $3 Million

Two of the most valuable cards in the collection: Ty Cobb (left) and Honus "Hans" Wagner.
Heritage Auctions

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:33 pm

"My grandfather stuck it in the attic a hundred years ago and here it is now, a blessing to his grandchildren."

A blessing for sure.

As the Toledo Blade reports, when Karl Kissner and his cousins were clearing out his grandfather's home in Defiance, Ohio, on Feb. 29 they came across a box of very rare and very valuable baseball cards.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Wed July 11, 2012

In Scranton, Pa., City Workers Sue Over Having Wages Slashed

Roger Leonard, a heavy equipment operator for the city of Scranton, Pa., saw his pay plunge to $340 from about $900 for two weeks' work after the mayor cut city-employee pay to minimum wage.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 8:32 am

The city of Scranton, Penn. now faces two federal lawsuits over a decision last week to slash public employee's pay to minimum wage. Unions representing the city's workers also are asking Lackawanna County Judge Michael Barrasse to hold Mayor Chris Doherty in contempt of court.

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Around the Nation
5:33 am
Wed July 11, 2012

City Of Brotherly Love Has A Different Kind Of Cupid

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Two-Way
5:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Episcopal Church OKs Same-Sex Blessings; Largest U.S. Denomination To Do So

The rings of Michael Johnson and Michael Roberts of New York City stood ready before their marriage ceremony at the Manhattan City Clerk's Office in July 2011.
Craig Ruttle AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 9:54 am

With a vote Tuesday evening by its House of Deputies, the Episcopal Church became the largest U.S. denomination so far "to officially sanction same-sex relationships," as CNN's Belief blog writes.

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Wed July 11, 2012

eHarmony Has An App For When A Date Goes South

The app simulates a rescue phone call. The app can show a telephone number — a coworker's, your mother's — and a photo of the supposed caller. Although it can't guarantee your date will believe the fake excuse.

Business
4:50 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Third California City To Seek Bankruptcy Protection

The City Council in San Bernardino, Calif., voted Tuesday night to seek Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, making it the third California city in less than two weeks to make the rare move. The city faces a $45 million budget shortfall.

NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Secrecy Surrounds Jesse Jackson Jr.'s Illness

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Now to a political mystery in Chicago. Constituents and colleagues are demanding to know more about the whereabouts and condition of Congressman Jesse Jackson, Junior. Jackson took a leave of absence a month ago, but his office has been vague about why. And that lack of information about Jackson is the talk of the town. From Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

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NPR Story
3:16 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Obama Tells Iowa Voters He'll Help The Middle-Class

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:49 am

President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney are hitting the campaign trail hard this week. On Tuesday, the president was campaigning in Iowa — the state that helped to launch his White House bid in 2008. He told supporters in Iowa he wants a second term in order to finish what he started.

NPR Story
3:04 am
Wed July 11, 2012

National League Wins Baseball's All-Star Game 8-0

Major League Baseball's 83rd All-Star Game wrapped up Tuesday night in Kansas City, Missouri. The National League trounced the American league in an 8-0 blowout, with impressive performances by some San Francisco Giants. Melky Cabrera of the Giants hit the game's only home run and took home the MVP Award.

NPR Story
2:54 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Peter O'Toole Bids Farewell To The Big Screen

Just before his 80th birthday, actor Peter O'Toole announced he is retiring. He has been nominated eight times for Academy Awards but never won. He did receive an honorary Oscar.

Science
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Researchers Take Stock Of 2011 Weather

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across America people are sweltering through extreme heat this year, continuing a long-term trend of rising temperatures. Inevitably, many are wondering if the scorching heat is due to global warming. Scientists are expected to dig into the data and grapple with that in the months to come. They've already taken a stab at a possible connection with last year's extreme weather events, like the blistering drought in Texas. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

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NPR Story
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Manchester United Hopes To Score With Its IPO

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:06 am

Manchester United is the most famous soccer team in the United Kingdom, and one of the world's most popular sports teams. Now its owners are hoping the team's popularity will translate into big bucks. They're planning to sell Manchester United stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Roger Blitz, of the Financial Times, talks to Renee Montagne about the team's IPO.

NPR Story
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The ownership of American pro sports got just a little more international. That's our last word in business today.

Pro basketball's Brooklyn Nets, formerly the New Jersey Nets, are owned by a Russian businessman. An Indonesian media owner possesses part of the Philadelphia 76ers. And now, that same Indonesian man is among the new investors in D.C. United, the pro soccer team. His name is Erick Thohir.

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Asia
1:39 am
Wed July 11, 2012

'Hard Questions' Remain In U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistani border guards check trucks heading to Afghanistan, in the tribal area of Khyber last week.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

A U.S. operation in the mountains near Afghanistan last November killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. Pakistan wanted an apology. The U.S. refused. In response, Pakistan shut down supply routes to Afghanistan for NATO convoys.

After intense talks, two border crossings were reopened last week to convoys for the U.S. and NATO forces.

Pakistan's ambassador in Washington, Sherry Rehman, was at the center of the negotiations. Afterward she called it a moment of great opportunity for the two countries.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
1:23 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Women's Field Hockey Aims To End Olympic Drought

Paige Selenski (right) of the United States fights for the ball against two Mexican opponents in a women's field hockey match at last October's Pan American Games in Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

As one of the world's most popular sports, field hockey produces celebrities in Argentina, the Netherlands and Australia. But the sport is relatively obscure in the United States, where members of the women's national team receive a small monthly stipend and their notoriety comes from outside the country.

Later this month, the group heads to London, where it will try to earn the first American medal in the sport in 28 years.

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Economy
1:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Euro Currency Still Faring Well, For Now

Over the last 13 years, the euro has been worth on average $1.21, only a penny less than its current price of $1.22 per euro.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 10:42 am

The euro touched a two-year low against the dollar Tuesday, as concerns about the eurozone debt crisis continued.

Despite a recession across much of the eurozone and even predictions of the currency's demise, however, the euro has held up relatively well during this crisis.

Over the last 13 year, it has taken on average $1.21 to buy a euro. Now, even in this midst of this crisis, it's worth virtually the same ($1.22).

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World
1:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Spanish Families Share Expenses And Tradition

A woman pushes a pram though the Plaza de Murillo on July 3 in Madrid. Spain's custom for multiple families to live under the same roof has tied them closer together as well as their wallets. The country has the highest unemployment rate in the Eurozone, and government benefits help aid those out of work.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 7:48 pm

What used to be a Spanish tradition is now becoming more of an economic necessity.

In Spain, the social safety net that helps people survive the economic crisis has two parts: government benefits and close family ties. The country has the highest rate in Europe of multi-generational families all living together.

With a quarter of Spaniards out of work, more parents pick up their kids from school themselves, in the middle of what would have been a workday.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Will Medicaid Bring The Uninsured Out Of The Woodwork?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is the latest state executive to say no to an expansion of Medicaid.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:54 pm

Ever since the Supreme Court decided last month that an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act should be optional, quite a few Republican governors have been vowing to take a pass.

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The Salt
1:20 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Cool Down With A Hot Drink? It's Not As Crazy As You Think

Joe Palca serves up some hot tea on a very hot day at Teaism in Washington, D.C., last week.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 7:47 pm

Hot tea on a hot day? Not for me, thank you. Not my idea of how to cool down.

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World
1:19 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Venezuela Begins Debate On Future Without Chavez

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, seen speaking during a TV program in Caracas on June 15, will compete with former opposition governor Henrique Capriles and other candidates in October's presidential elections.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

In Venezuela, people are beginning to talk about what was once unthinkable: Just who could succeed the all-powerful President Hugo Chavez?

He has been battling cancer, which for much of this year forced him to suspend his once-frequent TV appearances. On Monday, Chavez declared himself free of the cancer, though it's not the first time he's said he was cured.

For 13 years, he has consolidated his hold on power while nationalizing farmland and seizing private companies. And now, despite his infrequent appearances, he remains a political force.

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Going To The Game: The Price Is Wrong?

Andy Murray returns a shot during the men's final match at Wimbledon. A pair of tickets for the match went for £32,000 (about $50,000).
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

Sports is more ubiquitous than ever on television. And sports is almost the only thing that's left, live, on TV. NBC Universal is even going to let Americans see the Olympics live this year.

Nevertheless, despite TV's charm, last week as Andy Murray, Great Britain's homeboy, drew closer to making the Wimbledon final, the word was that tickets for actual Centre Court seats would be scalped for up to £32,000 a pair. If you're not hanging around the currency exchange market, that comes to something like $50,000. For two tickets. To a game.

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Report: Some Americans Have Lost Homes Over As Little As $400

Furniture and personal belongings sit in front of a house that appears to have been foreclosed on in Antioch, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 8:02 pm

A report from a consumer group released today says that vulnerable owners are losing their homes for owing as little as $400 in back taxes.

The AP reports:

"Outdated state laws allow big banks and other investors to reap windfall profits by buying the houses for a pittance and reselling them, the National Consumer Law Center said in a report being released Tuesday.

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It's All Politics
3:30 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intriguing Opportunity, But Some Risk For Romney In Speech To NAACP

A sign at the NAACP annual convention in Houston, where Mitt Romney is scheduled to speak on Wednesday.
Pat Sullivan AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's planned speech Wednesday at the NAACP convention in Houston comes at a precarious time for the nation's African-American community.

-- The unemployment rate among blacks is north of 14 percent — more than 5 points higher than the national average.

-- Opponents of GOP-led efforts to require voters in about a dozen states to show identification say the voter ID laws could disproportionately disenfranchise legal black and Latino voters.

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Around the Nation
3:25 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse
3:25 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

NewsPoet: Paisley Rekdal Writes The Day In Verse

Paisley Rekdal visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Tuesday.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:10 pm

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Penn State Will Release Report On Sex-Abuse Scandal On Thursday

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in handcuffs after a jury found him guilty on 45 of 48 charges in his sex abuse trial in Bellefonte, Pa., Friday.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:49 am

This Thursday, Penn State University will release an independent report on the sex-abuse scandal that has rocked the institution and its football program.

After allegations of child abuse surfaced against Jerry Sandusky, the university appointed Judge Louis Freeh to look into how the university handled the case. The university and its leaders including former legendary football coach Joe Paterno have been criticized for what has been characterized as slow action.

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The Salt
2:56 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Second Helping Of Pie Week: How Pumpkin Pie Turned My Life Around

Pumpkin pie to the rescue?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:57 pm

Yes, we know, Pie Week is officially over, and we already commemorated your contributions to it with our Storify post on Friday. But one more irresistible pie story came across the transom that we just had to share.

So without further ado, here's NPR listener Marie Metivier-DeMasters' story about how pie changed her life, which we received by email and edited a bit for length and clarity:

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Europe
2:34 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

'Vultures' Swoop In For Deals In Debt-Ridden Spain

A "For Sale" sign hangs outside mostly empty apartment blocks in the Madrid satellite town of Sesena in February. Banks are trying to sell billions of euros worth of property left by bankrupt developers. This is attracting bargain-hunting investors from abroad.
Andrea Comas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

Back in the day, Madrid's Palace Hotel was Ernest Hemingway's old haunt, or at least the bar was. Now, rooms at the posh hotel just down from the famed Prado Museum go for up to $6,000 a night. And gathering in its lobby these days? An altogether different type of foreigner: the kind in expensive suits.

"Probably they are institutional investors, hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds," says Federico Steinberg, an economist at Madrid's Elcano Institute.

There's a lot of cash around the world, he says, and a lot of people looking for bargains.

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It's All Politics
2:29 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Taxes, Jobs And Jabs: Obama And Romney Slug It Out In Swing States

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:57 pm

President Obama campaigned in Iowa on Tuesday, promoting his plan to extend the Bush-era tax cuts for those who make under $250,000 a year — but not for more wealthy Americans.

Republican Mitt Romney was in another swing state, Colorado, hitting a new Republican charge that some of Obama's policies have helped create jobs overseas at the expense of the domestic job market.

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