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Afghanistan
2:42 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Deal Reached On U.S.-Afghan Strategic Partnership

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
2:42 am
Mon April 23, 2012

German Chemical Plant Fire Threatens Auto Backlog

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Next, we have a tale of globalization, how a single fire at a company in Germany could affect business in Detroit or Shanghai.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The company is a chemical plant in a town called Marl. An explosion there killed two people. It was a tragedy, but did not seem to have global significance.

MONTAGNE: Until car companies realized that Marl is vital to their business. NPR's Sonari Glinton explains.

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NPR Story
2:35 am
Mon April 23, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:03 am

The denim store in Kobe, Japan, sells jeans for $350. The store is able to sell a pair of jeans for that price because it's tapped into a Japanese subculture that is obsessed by 1950s Americana.

NPR Story
2:35 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Incumbent Sarkozy Faces French Presidential Runoff

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Renee Montagne is back with us. Renee, welcome back.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Glad to be back, Steve. Thanks.

Let's begin with one of the most colorful European leaders, who is on the verge of losing his job. Nicolas Sarkozy has walked the world stage with his supermodel wife on his arm.

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NPR Story
2:35 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now Marco Rubio happens to be one of those regularly mentioned as a possible vice presidential choice for Mitt Romney. And that's where we pick up our discussion with Cokie Roberts, who joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: So is the vice presidential choice an opportunity for Romney to appeal to Hispanics?

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Mitt Romney
1:41 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Immigration Remains A Dicey Issue For Romney, GOP

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign rally in Tempe, Ariz., on Friday.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:29 am

At a Republican candidates' forum in Wisconsin before the state's primary earlier this month, a speaker who wasn't on the ballot had strong words for the GOP regarding its low standing among Hispanic voters.

"The way the party ... talks about immigration is going to impact the future course of this party and the future course of this nation," said former U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, the first Hispanic to hold the nation's highest law enforcement post.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:40 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Swaddling and Shushing Help Soothe Babies After Vaccinations

I could use some shushing and swaddling right about now.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:57 am

Imagine you're a happy baby, off with your folks to visit the doctor.

"They're probably thinking, 'Oh hi everybody, hi!' and suddenly — boom! A shot," says John Harrington, a pediatrician in Norfolk, Va.

Who wouldn't scream at that?

But Harrington says that the same techniques used to soothe a fussy baby can also help an infant overcome the pain of vaccinations.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:39 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Children With Autism Are Often Targeted By Bullies

Abby Mahoney, 13, has Asperger's syndrome. She says she has memorized nearly everything there is to know about Star Wars. Her enthusiasm for the subject helped make her the target of a bullying boy.
Courtesy of the Mahoney family

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:42 am

Lots of kids get bullied. But kids with autism are especially vulnerable.

A new survey by the Interactive Autism Network found that nearly two-thirds of children with autism spectrum disorders have been bullied at some point. And it found that these kids are three times as likely as typical kids to have been bullied in the past month.

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Education
1:38 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Chicago Wants Longer School Day; Foes Want Details

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel sits with South Side first-graders in October. Emanuel's plan to lengthen the school day and the school year has met with resistance.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 am

Most kids in Chicago's public schools spend just five hours and 45 minutes in school a day. It's one of the shortest school days in the country.

That's why more than half of the city's public elementary schools have no recess. At those that do, it's shockingly short.

"We have a 10-minute recess and a 10-minute lunch at our school," says Wendy Katten, mother of a third-grader at Burley Elementary School in Chicago. "It's not sufficient."

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The Salt
1:36 am
Mon April 23, 2012

How Making Food Safe Can Harm Wildlife And Water

A clampdown on contamination in growing fields has pushed out wildlife and destroyed habitats.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:36 am

We'd probably like to think that clean, safe food goes hand in hand with pristine nature, with lots of wildlife and clean water. But in the part of California that grows a lot of the country's lettuce and spinach, these two goals have come into conflict.

Environmental advocates say a single-minded focus on food safety has forced growers of salad greens to strip vegetation from around their fields, harming wildlife and polluting streams and rivers.

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Author Interviews
1:23 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Rodney King Comes To Grips With 'The Riot Within'

After suffering from injuries from the beating and struggling publicly with alcoholism, today Rodney King is contented, sober and engaged — to Cynthia Kelley, who served on the jury of King's civil trial against the city.
Morgan St. John

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:30 am

With a helicopter buzzing overhead, the videotape of Rodney King's encounter with police is so famous, you could say he was beaten into American history: The image of him writhing in pain as several Los Angeles police officers repeatedly beat, kicked and tasered him is, by now, world-famous — and synonymous with abuse of power.

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Economy
3:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor

President Clinton prepares to sign legislation overhauling America's welfare system at the White House Rose Garden on Aug. 22, 1996. Today, the ranks of the nation's poor have swelled to a record 46.2 million — nearly 1 in 6 Americans — as the prolonged pain of the recession leaves millions still struggling and out of work.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:50 am

Welfare changes in the 1990s helped slash cash benefit rolls, yet the use of food stamps is soaring today. About 15 percent of Americans use food stamps. The program has become what some call the new welfare.

A big reason why is a deal struck between President Clinton and the Republican-controlled Congress in 1996. At that time, the number of Americans who received cash payments — what's often thought of as welfare — was at an all-time high.

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Books
3:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. That's the starting sentence for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction. That's our contest where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes. Our readers from across the country are combing through all of our 6,000 submissions this round. Let's hear a sample of their favorites so far.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
3:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Women Take Over The Farm

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Staying in the middle of the country, you might have heard that America's farmers are getting older. Something else you probably know: women tend to outlive men. So do the math and what do you get? More women in charge of land and some who aren't really sure how to take care of it. So as Iowa Public Radio's Sarah McCammon reports, female conservationists are reaching out to this growing group.

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Interviews
3:03 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Comparing Trayvon Martin, O.J. Simpson Cases

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

On Friday, TV audiences got their first taste of the media frenzy that could come with a televised Trayvon Martin trial when a Florida judge granted bail to George Zimmerman. That decision, whether to televise or not, has yet to be made.

Writer John McWhorter thinks it would be a very good thing. And in the latest issue of The New Republic, he argues that it could become a bookend to another famous and racially charged trial: the O.J. Simpson case.

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Europe
3:02 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

France's Sarkozy Faces Election Runoff

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

President Nicolas Sarkozy and socialist rival Francois Hollande were the top vote-getters in the first round of the French presidential election today. They'll head to a runoff on May 6. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris sent us this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS)

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Around the Nation
1:50 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

A Return To 'Safety First' For Michigan Nuclear Plant

It's been quiet at the Palisades nuclear power plant after five unexpected shutdowns in 2011.
Mark Savage Entergy

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

The Palisades nuclear power plant in Michigan had five unplanned shutdowns last year. It's one of the area's biggest employers, and its safety record is one of the worst in the country. Now it's trying to prove to federal regulators that it can meet their standards.

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the Palisades Power Plant is tucked in between tall sand dunes in Covert Township, Mich., at the southern edge of Van Buren State Park.

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Author Interviews
12:21 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

India: A Country In The Midst Of Change

Riverhead Books

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:23 pm

Akash Kapur is the son of an Indian father and an American mother. In 2003, after working professionally in New York City for more than a decade, he decided to return to India. As he writes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India, he arrived in a place he hardly recognized.

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Food
12:11 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Fake Food: That's Not Kobe Beef You're Eating

Is that real Kobe beef? If you're eating it in the United States, then it's not.
Kelly Cline iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:45 am

An increasing number of restaurants in the U.S. display signature dishes made with Kobe beef. From Kobe steak raviolis to Kobe beef burgers, you name it, Kobe beef seems to be popping up everywhere — except it's not Kobe beef.

Food writer Larry Olmsted of Forbes.com couldn't help but notice the trend and decided to bust everyone's bubble in a three-part expose of the so-called domestic Kobe beef industry.

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Middle East
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Bahrain Car Race: A Complicated Political Reminder

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

On Sunday morning, Formula One racing cars are competing for first place in a controversial race in the Arab kingdom of Bahrain. Violent anti-government protests have continued in the run-up to the race. Host Rachel Martin talks with Nabeel Rajab, president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights.

Presidential Race
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Who Romney Keeps Close

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Mitt Romney, the presumptive candidate for the Republican nomination, is hiring hundreds of new staffers over the next few months. The former Massachusetts governor is still surrounded by a trusted core of senior advisers, however, and they aren't going anywhere. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Ari Shapiro about the inner circle.

Politics
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Utah's Orrin Hatch Survives GOP Convention

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Utah Senator Orrin Hatch survived his state's Republican nominating convention yesterday, but barely failed to get enough votes to avoid a June primary. It'll be the six-term senator's first primary in 36 years. Still, he's not complaining because convention delegates didn't toss him from the race and ultimately from the Senate. That's what they did two years ago with three-term incumbent Bob Bennett.

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Politics
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

End Of The Tea Party As We Know It?

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Have we seen the end of the Tea Party movement? New York Times reporter Kate Zernike is the author of Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America. Host Rachel Martin talks with Zernike about the Tea Party's current relevance and influence in the political process.

Remembrances
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Chuck Colson's Greatest Legacy May Be His Story

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Charles "Chuck" Colson, a key figure in the Richard Nixon White House, died Saturday. Colson was the president's special counsel and went to prison for his role in the Watergate scandal. While behind bars, he embraced Christianity. As NPR's Joel Rose reports, he went on to become a central evangelical leader after his release.

Sports
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Can't Join The Club: London Marathon 'Ever-Presents'

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks the 32nd annual London Marathon. Summer Olympic hopeful, Wilson Kipsang, won the men's race, while fellow Kenyan Mary Keitany won the women's for a second consecutive year. Others, well, Vicki Barker met the event's most seasoned veterans: the so-called Ever-Presents, who've run in all 31 previous marathons. Time is reducing their numbers, she says - but not their enthusiasm.

(SOUNDBITE OF RAIN FALLING)

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Sports
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Sports: Noteworthy Pitch Performances

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE BALL GAME")

SISTER WYNONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game, being played each day...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE BALL GAME")

MARTIN: And if it's true that life's a ball game, NPR's Mike Pesca is WEEKEND EDITION's umpire, calling the pitches and the plays as he sees them. He joins us now to talk more about sports and life and - hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hey. How are you doing, Rachel?

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Europe
5:33 am
Sun April 22, 2012

First Round Of Voting Begins In France

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 9:43 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:03 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Arizona's Illegal Workforce Is Down, So Now What?

Undocumented immigrants are searched before boarding a deportation flight in Mesa, Ariz., last June. Since the passage of the state's immigration law two years ago, thousands of illegal workers have left.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 3:41 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on the most divisive immigration law in recent memory. Arizona's Legislature passed SB 1070 two years ago, but much of it has been put on hold pending the court's decision.

Still, supporters say the law has achieved one of its stated goals: Thousands of illegal immigrants have self-deported, leaving the state on their own. The real reason — and consequence — of such a demographic shift may be more complex, however.

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Environment
4:02 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Expedition Seeks To Save Florida's 'Terra Incognita'

Carlton Ward Jr., leader of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, kayaks into the Everglades sunset.
Steve Newborn for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 11:16 am

Members of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition sport calluses and legs hardened by three months of hiking through saw grass, palmetto stands and piney woods.

On Sunday, these four adventurers mark the end of a 1,000-mile trek across Florida, from the tip of the Everglades to the Okefenokee Swamp.

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Latin America
4:01 am
Sun April 22, 2012

In Argentina's Oil, A Glimpse Of Latin America's Left

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez holds up a petroleum sample as she announces plans for her government to nationalize a giant oil company that is largely owned by a private Spanish company. Behind her is an image of the country's former first lady, Eva Peron.
Daniel Garcia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 3:41 pm

Just the arrival of Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner prompted supporters in her Peronist movement to break into chants last Monday. The event, choreographed to feel momentous, was at the presidential palace. Fernandez de Kirchner announced plans to expropriate assets of the Spanish oil firm Repsol in Argentina.

Through a window, television viewers could see a huge image of Evita Peron, the famous 1950s-era populist whose presence is deeply felt in today's government.

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