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2:38 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

California Industries Spar Over Internet Piracy

Supporters of the website The Pirate Bay, one of the world's top illegal file-sharing websites, demonstrate in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2009.
Fredrik Persson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 5:10 pm

There's a civil war going on in California. It's the north vs. the south — Hollywood vs. Silicon Valley. And much like that other American Civil War, there are two different economic worldviews at stake. One of the highest-profile battles was fought last month, when large Internet sites like Wikipedia staged an online blackout to protest anti-piracy bills in Congress.

The north won that battle, and for now, the legislation is on hold. But the war between Hollywood and Silicon Valley over how to deal with intellectual property is far from over.

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The Salt
2:00 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Why Astronauts Crave Tabasco Sauce

Astronauts may have a particular affinity for Tabasco sauce in space because their sense of smell and taste is distorted.
John Rose NPR

If you think astronauts just want dehydrated dinners and freeze-dried ice cream, think again. After a few days in space, they start reaching for the hot sauce.

In fact, they may start craving foods they didn't necessarily like on Earth.

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It's All Politics
1:54 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Voter ID Backer, Opponent Agree On One Point: Voter Rolls Are A Mess

There are few people further apart on the issue of new voter photo ID requirements than Laura Murphy and Hans von Spakovsky.

She's director of the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office. He's with the Heritage Foundation and a former Justice Department official under George W. Bush.

So when the two went head-to-head Thursday on the issue at the National Press Club in Washington DC, there were a few sparks.

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Presidential Race
1:44 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

For Loyalists, Is It Ron Paul Or Nothing?

Fans of GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul show their support outside the Mesa Arts Center before Wednesday night's Republican debate in Mesa, Ariz.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 2:31 pm

Benom Plumb, a 31-year-old music industry executive from Nashville, thinks the country is on the wrong path, and that Ron Paul is the only candidate who can turn things around.

As for the other Republicans, Plumb doesn't mince words: Mitt Romney? Too slick. Rick Santorum? Too religious. Newt Gingrich? Untrustworthy. "They are all liars and cheaters, if you ask me," he says.

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World
1:42 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

For War Reporters, The Risks Of Going Solo

Veteran war correspondent Marie Colvin often traveled by herself to the front lines of conflicts to interview civilians trapped by war. Colvin, who was killed Wednesday in the Syrian city of Homs, is shown here in Cairo in an undated photo.
Ivor Prickett AP

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 3:26 pm

War correspondents have always been at the short end of the actuarial tables. Life insurance salesmen do not pester them. No war is safe, and no correspondent is bulletproof.

But the rules of the game have been changing, and the recent deaths in Syria of two prominent correspondents, Anthony Shadid of The New York Times and Marie Colvin, an American working for Britain's Sunday Times, show how this line of work has grown even riskier.

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Planet Money
1:42 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

How Mitt Romney's Firm Transformed A Struggling Company, In 5 Steps

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:19 am

Mitt Romney says his experience in private equity taking over troubled companies would make him a good manager of America's economy. So we're reporting on companies that Bain Capital bought while Romney was in charge of the firm. This morning, we told the story of one that went bust. Here's the story of one that succeeded.

How A Private-Equity Firm Turns A Company Around

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The Two-Way
1:40 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Guy Walks Into A Denny's, Cooks A Burger, Gets Arrested

Denny's was the scene. Fraud is among the alleged crimes. A burger may have been cooked.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

This alleged crime in Madison, Wis., is odd enough — or funny enough, depending on your point of view — to begin with.

It seems that 52-year-old James B. Summers went into a local Denny's restaurant Tuesday afternoon and said he was the new general manager. This was a surprise to the folks working there.

Summers, though, insisted that he was indeed the new boss. And he seemed to be familiar with the kitchen — he grabbed a soft drink and cooked up a cheeseburger and fries.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Closing Time: Postal Service May Cut 35,000 Jobs

The exterior of a Burlingame, Calif. U.S. Postal Service mailing processing center that has been approved for full consolidation.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 2:50 am

Facing a financial crisis, the United States Postal Service announced that 223 processing facilities have been "found feasible for consolidation, all or in part." Of the 264 processing facilities studied, only 35 are set to remain open.

The closings could result in the loss of 35,000 jobs. USPS has posted a full list of the facilities — which process and sort mail on its way to being delivered — on its website.

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Race
1:21 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

African-American Museum Has Its Groundbreaking

On Wednesday, President Obama and a number of special guests celebrated the groundbreaking for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Smithsonian museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is expected to open in 2015.

The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

West Virginia Report On Mine Disaster Points To State's Shortcomings

At an April 25, 2010, service in Beckley, W. Va., for the 29 miners killed in the Upper Big Branch explosion, helmets — placed on crosses — were lined up in their honor.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

West Virginia's Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training has issued what is now the fourth investigative report on the April, 2010, Upper Big Branch mine explosion. It largely agrees with the earlier reviews, but in language that's tepid in comparison.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Bradley Manning Defers His Plea In WikiLeaks Case

The Army private accused of leaking a huge cache of classified information to the website WikiLeaks deferred his plea, today.

In an arraignment before a military judge at Fort Meade in Maryland, Bradley Manning also put off a decision on whether to be tried by military jury or military judge.

The AP reports:

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It's All Politics
12:13 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

In South Carolina, New Report Finds No Evidence Of "Dead" Voters

The South Carolina State Election Commission has just released its initial review of allegations from the state's Department of Motor Vehicles that more than 950 deceased voters appeared to have ballots cast in their names after they died. And no surprise, the commission found that of the 207 cases reviewed, there was no evidence in 197 of them that fraudulent votes had been cast. The commission said that records in the other 10 cases were "insufficient to make a determination."

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Thu February 23, 2012

LAPD Chief Says Illegal Immigrants Should Get Driver's Licenses

Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck.
Nick Ut AP

Whether undocumented immigrants are granted driver's licenses has been one of those mainstay questions in the country.

Yesterday, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck jumped firmly into the debate, arguing that immigrants in the country illegally should be given some kind driver's permit.

Beck argued that it was a matter of public safety.

The AP reports:

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Business
11:01 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Obama's Corporate Tax Cut Plan Faces Uphill Battle

Boeing employees work on a plane engine at the company's factory in Everett, Wash. The Obama administration's corporate tax cut proposal would offer even deeper cuts for U.S. manufacturers like Boeing.
Stephen Brashear Getty Images

President Obama's plan to overhaul the nation's corporate tax system would sharply cut the taxes that U.S. companies pay. But it would also eliminate many of the loopholes that help them pare down what they owe.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says the proposal unveiled Wednesday should appeal to both Democrats and Republicans, by doing what both sides "say is important to do ... which is lower the rate, broaden the base [and] eliminate the underbrush of unnecessary subsidies and loopholes and special provisions that complicate the tax code."

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The Salt
10:58 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Raw Milk Movement Takes Hits From Courts, Health Officials

John Clark pours raw milk into a glass at Applecheek Farm in Hyde Park, Vt.
Toby Talbot ASSOCIATED PRESS

It has been a bit of a sour week for drinkers of raw milk.

Yesterday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said a federal court had granted it a permanent injunction to keep a Pennsylvania raw milk maker from distributing across state lines to raw milk buying clubs. The decision was the latest in an escalating battle between the federal government and producers and consumers of raw milk.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Thu February 23, 2012

NBA Phenom Lin Leaves Teammate's Couch For High-Rise Condo

Jeremy Lin #17 of the New York Knicks looks on against the Atlanta Hawks at Madison Square Garden on Wednesday.
Chris Trotman Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 10:47 am

Jeremy Lin has yet one more thing to celebrate today: After his meteoric rise from benchwarmer to superstar, the 23-year-old now has a Manhattan condo to call his own.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Lin signed a contract to rent a condo on the 38th floor of the W New York Downtown Hotel.

The Journal adds:

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Thu February 23, 2012

From War Correspondents In Libya, A Toast To Fallen Comrades In Syria

Journalist Marie Colvin (second from left) poses with Libyan rebels in Misrata on June 4, 2011. She was killed in the besieged Syrian city of Homs on Wednesday. Later that day in Tripoli, fellow war correspondents gathered to remember her.
Zohra Bensemra Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 11:45 am

We arrived nearly an hour late, our taxi drivers lost in the potholed, half-flooded streets of Tripoli. Our Libyan host, who would never have fathomed an on-time start anyway, invited us upstairs, where he had managed to arrange an impressive array of hors d'oeuvres and beverages on such short notice.

People arrived in groups of three or four at a time. Everyone knew almost everyone else. They hugged each other as if it could be their last time, struggled to hold back the tears, occasionally finding a way to evince a smile from each other.

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Syrian Officials To Blame For Crimes Against Humanity, U.N. Panel Suggests

Syrians today carried the body of a youth reportedly killed in violence in the Idlib region.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

A United Nations panel says it has evidence that top Syrian officials "bear responsibility for crimes against humanity and other gross human rights violations" during the nearly year-long crackdown on dissent that has left thousands of civilians dead.

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All Tech Considered
9:01 am
Thu February 23, 2012

CU In Court: Texts Can Be A Divorce Lawyer's Dream

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 4:36 pm

Americans have learned to carefully craft their Facebook postings, and edit and spell-check e-mails. But apparently we don't give text messages much thought, and they're providing abundant and effective fodder for divorce attorneys.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Flu Bug: Missing In Action

Ramon Maldonado-Cardenas grimaces as he gets a flu shot from pharmacy student Khoa Truong during a health fair in Sacramento, Calif., last October.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

It's been a weird winter. It's warm when it should be cold. There's mud where there should be snow. Flowers are blooming way ahead of schedule. Wildlife seems confused.

Well, here's one more weirdness: The flu season seems to be largely M.I.A.

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Politics
9:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Examining The SuperPAC With Colbert's Trevor Potter

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 11:19 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. SuperPACs have led to what was described in the New York Times yesterday as a new breed of super-donor. About two dozen individuals, couples or corporations have given a million dollars or more this year to Republican superPACs that have poured that money directly into this year's presidential campaign.

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Politics
9:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Understanding The Impact Of Citizens United

James Bopp is the lawyer who first represented Citizens United in the case that ended up in the Supreme Court, which ruled that corporations and unions could give money to political committees active in election campaigns. That decision and subsequent lower court decisions have led to SuperPACs, which allow corporations, unions and individuals to make unlimited contributions, pool them together, and use the money for political campaigns.

The Two-Way
8:05 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Google Glasses: Frightening Or Fantastic?

The view will be more sophisticated than this, but you get the idea.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 9:34 am

The buzz is building about the news that, as The New York Times has reported, there soon may be "Google glasses" that can "stream information to the wearer's eyeballs in real time."

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Reports: Marine Helicopters Crash In Southwest

(This post was updated with breaking news at 9:27 a.m. ET.)

Seven U.S. Marines were killed Wednesday night when two helicopters collided over the Yuma, Ariz., Training Range Complex, according to a statement just emailed to the NPR Newscast Desk by a spokesman for the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing.

The statement adds that:

"The aircraft, an AH-1W 'Cobra' and an UH-1Y 'Huey,' were conducting routine training operations around 8:00 p.m. Identities of the Marines will be withheld until next of kin have been notified."

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Jobless Claims Stay At Four-Year Low

There were 351,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, unchanged from the four-year-low level of the week before, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

It adds that "the 4-week moving average was 359,000, a decrease of 7,000 from the previous week's revised average of 366,000."

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The Two-Way
6:10 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Online Privacy Act's No. 1 Principle Is 'Individual Control'

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 7:09 am

  • Steve Henn, reporting on 'Morning Edition'

Saying that "we must reject the conclusion that privacy is an outmoded value" and that it has been "at the heart of our democracy from its inception," President Obama this morning released his administration's "Framework for Protecting Privacy and Promoting Innovation in the Global Digital Economy" — a "Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights."

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Report: Two U.S. Troops Killed In Afghanistan; Quran Burnings Backlash?

Demonstrators shouted anti-American slogans during a protest in Kabul today (Feb. 23, 2012).
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

"Two U.S. troops have been shot to death and four more wounded by an Afghan solider who turned his gun on his allies in apparent anger over the burning of Qurans at a U.S. military base in Afghanistan, an Afghan official tells CBS News."

Officially, the International Security Assistance Force says that:

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Around the Nation
5:28 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Ohio Church Makes Lenten Ashes Easy To Receive

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 5:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Europe
5:11 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Italian Cabinet Posts Finances, Website Crashes

Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti wants more transparency so he made his cabinet disclose their finances. That sparked so much interest, the government website crashed. Ministers own real estate in New York, Brussels and Paris. One made $9 million last year.

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