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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Rep. Issa Sends 'Fast And Furious' Subpoenas To Holder, Other Officials

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 12:53 pm

Saying "it's time we know the whole truth" about the so-called Fast and Furious gun trafficking operation, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee today followed through on his promise to issue subpoenas to Attorney General Eric Holder and other high-ranking Justice Department officials.

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The Impact of War
8:34 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Rebuilding Wounded Soldiers When They Return

David Wood is the senior military correspondent for The Huffington Post. He was previously a staff correspondent for Time Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, and The Baltimore Sun.

courtesy of David Wood

Better medical care and equipment means fewer troops are dying on the battlefield. But more troops are coming home severely wounded, with injuries that require lifelong care and cost millions of dollars in medical costs.

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The Salt
8:29 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Supply, Labor, Money Keys To Getting More Local Food Into Schools

The money is only part of the challenge facing school lunch programs who want to expand contracts with local farms.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 8:48 am

When it comes to meeting the goal of getting more local food into school lunch, a major challenge has always been finding the money. Thanks to the new school lunch law, more federal grants than ever are available.

But the problem is bigger than money. It takes a serious supply chain and dedicated labor to make it work, too.

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It's All Politics
8:26 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Fact-Checking The GOP Debate: What Candidates Said About The Economy

PolitiFact

In an interview for Wednesday's Morning Edition, Bill Adair, editor of PolitiFact.com and Washington bureau chief for the St. Petersburg Times, talked with NPR's Steve Inskeep about how candidates at Tuesday night's GOP debate rated on PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Wed October 12, 2011

'Underwear Bomber' Pleads Guilty

Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab is this hour pleading guilty to attempting to blow up a Detroit-bound passenger jet on Christmas Day 2009.

The Detroit Free Press, which is live-blogging the court action, reports that attorney Anthony Chambers surprised the courtroom earlier by announcing that "his client plans to plead guilty." And it adds that:

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It's All Politics
8:10 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Debate Does Nothing To Derail Romney's 'Kudzu Campaign'

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney maintained his frontrunner status in the GOP presidential debate at Dartmouth College on Tuesday.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 2:23 pm

Mitt Romney continued his dogged, incremental pursuit of the White House, dominating the GOP presidential debate on the economy Tuesday night. The man once touted as his most formidable opponent was barely a factor.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Israel, Hamas Prisoner-Swap Deal: The Ripple Effects

What does the deal reached by Israel and Hamas to exchange long-held Sgt. Gilad Schalit for about 1,000 Palestinian prisoners mean for the seemingly never-ending Mideast peace process and politics in the region?

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The Two-Way
6:30 am
Wed October 12, 2011

BlackBerry Outages Continue, Reports Say They've Spread To North America

Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 3:14 pm

The focus remains on "Europe, the Middle East, Africa and India," where millions of BlackBerry users are without text services for a third straight day, Reuters reports, but there's word now that the problems are also affecting folks in North America.

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The Two-Way
5:59 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Top Stories: Terror Plot, Baghdad Bombings, Republican Debate

Good morning.

Our early headline today was a follow to the news about an alleged plan by two Iranians to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.:

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

As for other stories making headlines (and we'll have more about some of them later), they include:

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

This courtroom drawing shows Manssor Arbabsiar (front, right), appearing before U.S. Southern District Court Judge Michael H. Dolinger on Tuesday.

Shirley Shepard AFP/Getty Images

Two words — brazen and bizarre — come to mind about the alleged plot by two Iranians to hire members of a Mexican drug cartel to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. and possibly bomb the Saudi and Israeli embassies in Washington, NPR's Tom Gjelten said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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Africa
12:32 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Famine-Stricken Somalia Suffers From Aid Drought

Humanitarian groups are increasingly worried about the looming budget cuts in U.S. foreign assistance. They argue that lives are at stake, literally, in places like the Horn of Africa, which is suffering its worst drought in decades.

Raising public and private money for that has been a challenge in the current economic environment.

Hollywood stars and politicians have resorted to using the F word — in this case Famine — to get the attention of Americans about the humanitarian emergency in Somalia.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Syrian Refugees In Turkey Call For International Help

Syrian refugees gather for a protest against Syrian President Bashar Assad at the Turkish Red Crescent camp in the Yayladagi district of the Turkish city of Hatay near the Syrian border, June 20, 2011. More than 7,000 Syrians are living in camps in Turkey.

Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

As political unrest and a government crackdown in Syria continue to simmer, more than 7,500 Syrian refugees have fled to camps in southeastern Turkey, and Syrians say many more would come if they could get past the Syrian army.

One of these camps, Altinozu, lies deep in the farm fields of Turkey's Hatay province. It appears to be well-planned and well-run, right down to the asphalt laid between the rows of white tents.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Immigrant Parents Rely On Kids For Help Online

" href="/post/immigrant-parents-rely-kids-help-online" class="noexit lightbox">

A pamphlet in Spanish for Cingular phone rate information is displayed in a Cingular store in Elmhurst, Illinois. Cingular announced in 2006 that it was converting 420 of their stores to "a bilingual concept," with both English and Spanish phone information, payment options and bilingual staff members.

Tim Boyle Getty Images

On a weekend in East L.A., kids do what they do anywhere else — play games, hang out in restaurants. But in this immigrant neighborhood, many of them have grown-up responsibilities. Fifteen-year-old Gonzalo Cruz says his parents depend on him for help online.

"When they need to look up a place, like a doctor's appointment, I show them," Cruz says. "Computers right now, in our country, they're just English. You have to use them a certain way, and they didn't learn to do that when they were little."

Thirteen year-old Cassandra Flores helps her parents pay bills online.

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Research News
10:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Pain At The Plate: Heat Increases Pitcher Retaliation

Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers is hit by a pitch from the Tampa Bay Rays' James Shields on Oct. 1 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.

Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 12:54 pm

Richard Larrick has been bothered by something for two decades.

"Twenty years ago, I'd done a paper with some graduate students just showing that in hotter temperatures, pitchers are more likely to hit batters with pitches," says Larrick, a professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

Was it because they would sweat more, and the ball might get slippery and hard to control? Or was it something intentional?

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Law
10:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Should Minor Offenders Be Subject To Strip Searches?

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments for a case testing whether prison guards may constitutionally strip search even minor traffic offenders when they are arrested and taken to jail.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 3:14 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether prison guards may constitutionally strip-search even minor traffic offenders when they are arrested and taken to jail.

For decades, most courts did not allow such blanket strip searches, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way.

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Sweetness And Light
8:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Football Uber Alles. Uber Alles, Football

It's hard to relate America's love for the NFL to the broader national temperament — but the league now dominates all sports. Here, a young Oakland Raiders fan watches his team on a recent Sunday.

Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images

Football is real big. Everybody knows that. But it is getting bigger. Football is now gigantic, monstrous, humongous. Sure, it was years ago that it passed baseball as our most popular sport, but by now it simply looms alone above the American sportscape.

I would rank the U.S. sports entities this way:

  1. The NFL
  2. College football
  3. Fantasy football
  4. Major League Baseball
  5. High school football
  6. The NBA
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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Pakistani Court Will Hear Appeal Of Confessed-Killer Mumtaz Qadri

Demonstrators outside the court where lawyers for Mumtaz Qadri, the confessed killer of the Punjab Governor Salman Taseer, petitioned the court to hear an appeal to overturn the death sentence against Qadri handed down by an Anti-Terror Court earlier this month.

Julie McCarthy NPR

A Pakistani court has decided to hear the appeal of the confessed-killer Mumtaz Qadri, who was sentenced to death this month for killing the Governor of Punjab earlier this year. The court's decision means that Qadri's death sentence has been suspended, until the high court rules on the appeal.

From Islamabad, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports that hundreds of his supporters rallied outside the courthouse, saying Qadri killed in support of Pakistan's blasphemy laws:


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National Security
4:48 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

U.S. Drawn Into Long-Running Iran-Saudi Feud

Adel al-Jubeir, shown in this 2004 photo, is Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S. and was the target of an Iranian assassination plot, according to the U.S. government.

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 9:49 pm

Iran and Saudi Arabia have a bitter rivalry that plays out on many fronts, and in a bombshell allegation by the U.S. government on Tuesday, it looks like that feud has come to the United States.

Iran's alleged assassination plot against Adel al-Jubeir, Saudi's ambassador to Washington, is not likely to prompt the Obama administration to take military action against Iran, according to analysts.

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Obama's Job Bill Faces First Test In Senate Vote

A modified version of President Obama's jobs bill will face its first test this afternoon, when the Senate votes on whether to take up the legislation. Obama has been on a nation-wide campaign to sell his bill the American public, but it seems unlikely to get the 60 votes necessary to move it forward in the Senate.

The New York Times reports that Obama said if he doesn't get the votes, the president will try to move it through the chambers in a piece-meal manner:

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The Two-Way
3:37 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Senate Passes Bill On Chinese Currency

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 4:41 pm

Update at 6:29 p.m. ET. With a 63-35 vote, the Senate passed a controversial bill that seeks to curb what lawmakers see as a Chinese advantage based on the country's manipulation of its currency.

The bill is mostly symbolic, because the House has said it will not move on its version of the bill until the White House expresses its opinion. The White House has said it is worried about whether the bill might violate international trade rules.

Our Original Post Continues:

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Jailing Of Ukrainian Opposition Leader Sparks Outrage In Europe

It was quite the scene at a Kiev court this afternoon: While a Ukranian judge handed a 7-year jail sentence to country's former prime minister and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko, she turned to reporters and started talking.

As the AP reports, Tymoshenko called the trial a "lynching" and accused the current president Viktor Yanukovych of instigating it:

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Shots - Health Blog
2:35 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Vitamin E Pills May Raise, Not Lower, Prostate Cancer Risk

iStockphoto.com

Vitamins seem like such a good thing that drugstores have whole aisles devoted to them, including products that promise a healthy prostate.

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The Salt
2:25 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Cooking (Or Not Cooking) Broccoli To Protect Its Nutritional Riches

Broccoli eaten raw may be the best way to take advantage of its cancer-fighting compounds.

J. Scott Applewhite AP

Is there a right or a wrong way to cook a vegetable? If you want to unleash all its disease-fighting superpowers, then the answer is probably yes.

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National Security
2:15 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

U.S.: Iranians Paid Others To Kill Saudi Diplomat

The Saudi ambassador to the U.S., Adel al-Jubeir, speaks to the press in Annapolis, Md., in 2007. The U.S. government said Tuesday that elements in the Iranian military plotted to kill the ambassador.

Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 8:08 pm

The Justice Department said Tuesday it had foiled a plot directed by elements in the Iranian government who sought to assassinate Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.

Attorney General Eric Holder said two men, Manssor Arbabsiar and Gholam Shakuri, have been accused in connection with the alleged plot. Authorities said they had planned a bombing to kill the Saudi ambassador, Adel al-Jubeir.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:03 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Supplements Look Risky In Study Of Older Women

Daily supplements come under fire for a lack of proved benefits and mounting evidence about risks.

iStockphoto.com

Eating too much, rather than not enough, is the big health problem for most Americans. Yet, many of us take a supplement or vitamin in the hope of staving off illness with big doses of particular nutrients.

A new study shows that might not be such a great idea. Use of many common supplements — iron, in particular — appeared to increase the risk of dying, and only calcium supplements appeared to reduce mortality risk. The increased risk amounted to a few percentage points in most instances.

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Politics
1:17 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Jobs Bill Falters Despite Presidential Push

President Obama speaks about job creation and the economy at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local No. 5 Training Center in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Ever since President Obama proposed his $447 billion jobs bill in a joint address to Congress last month, he has been campaigning for it nonstop. He has whipped up crowds all across America who chant: "Pass this bill!"

It contains a variety of measures to fight unemployment — everything from tax breaks for businesses to extended benefits for the jobless. But despite the campaigning, the Senate is expected to kill the proposal Tuesday on a procedural vote.

Jonathan Cowan of the centrist Democratic group Third Way says that's no big deal — it was always a long shot.

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Education
12:55 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

No Child Left Behind Waivers Worry Some Advocates

" href="/post/no-child-left-behind-waivers-worry-some-advocates" class="noexit lightbox">

Mill Creek Middle School Principal Rebecca Bowen says her school is "by no way, shape or form a failing school." But it is according to federal and state standards because its low-income, special education students were about 10 points behind the goals set on standardized tests.

Larry Abramson NPR

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 5:02 pm

The Obama administration wants states to focus more of their attention on the lowest-performing schools, where large numbers of students are failing state tests year after year.

So the Department of Education is inviting all states to apply for waivers from the No Child Left Behind law.

The waivers could win relief for schools where a small number of students are falling short of federal requirements.

But advocates for minority and special education students worry their students will be ignored.

The 'Failing School' Stigma

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Israel, Hamas Reach Prisoner-Swap Deal, Freeing Israeli Soldier Gilad Schalit

In this file image taken from a video released by Hamas in 2009, Israeli soldier Gilad Schalit is seen holding a newspaper in an unknown location.

Anonymous AP

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:46 am

The AP, along with several other news sources including Al Arabiya and Haaretz, are reporting that Israel and Hamas have reached a prisoner-swap deal that will free Israeli Sgt. Gilad Schalit and hundreds of Palestinian prisoners.

Schalit, if you remember, was captured by Palestinian militants in 2006 and his father, Noam, has led a popular effort to free him.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:33 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Global Tuberculosis Cases Drop For First Time

A woman, left, cuts the hair of a fellow tuberculosis patient at a clinic in the township of Khayelitsha, on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa, in March.

Schalk van Zuydam AP

Worldwide tuberculosis cases are declining annually for the first time, according to a report just out from the World Health Organization. Deaths from the disease have also sunk to the lowest level in a decade.

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