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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Tracking Device On 'Happy Feet' The Penguin Is Silent

Back in June, Happy Feet showed up on Peka Peka Beach in New Zealand.
Richard Gill AP

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 7:03 am

It looks like we may never know if Happy Feet the wayward penguin makes it home.

"The satellite transmitter that was attached to Happy Feet has not been received since Friday 9 September 2011, NZ time," report the analysts at Sirtrack, which had been following the little guy's progress.

"This leads to the conclusion that either the satellite transmitter has detached or an unknown event has prevented Happy Feet from resurfacing," they add.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Cigarette May Have Ignited Pipeline, Killing Scores In Kenya

Horrific news from Kenya this morning:

"A leaking gasoline pipeline in Nairobi exploded on Monday, turning part of a slum into an inferno in which at least 61 people were killed and more than 100 hurt." (The Associated Press)

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Developing: Explosion At Nuclear Reprocessing Plant In France

The local newspaper reports it has been told there was "no radiation leak" earlier today after an explosion at a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in southern France.

But much remains unknown about just what happened at the plant in Marcoule, near the Mediterranean Sea.

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The Two-Way
5:50 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Europe's Troubles May Pull Stocks Down Again

Good morning.

The nation paused over the weekend to remember the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and to honor those who sacrificed that day and in the years since. If you want to look back at the weekend's events, our posts are collected here and NPR's "Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001" special series of stories is here.

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The Two-Way
5:15 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Focus Shifts Back To Jobs: Obama To Send His Bill To Congress Today

A job fair sign at the Suffolk County One Stop Employment Center last week in Hauppauge, N.Y.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

With the solemn ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks now over, Washington returns to the subject most likely to dominate the political debate between now and the November 2012 presidential election:

Jobs.

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Your Health
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

For The Dying, A Chance To Rewrite Life

Kate Frego pins the turban of her mother, Aida Essenburg. Before Essenburg died in July of this year, she sat down with a dignity therapist to record the history of her life in what became a 50-page document.
Courtesy of Kate Frego

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 11:47 am

For several decades, psychiatrists who work with the dying have been trying to come up with new psychotherapies that can help people cope with the reality of their death. One of these therapies asks the dying to tell the story of their life.

This end-of-life treatment, called dignity therapy, was created by a man named Harvey Chochinov. When Chochinov was a young psychiatrist working with the dying, he had a powerful experience with one of the patients he was trying to counsel — a man with an inoperable brain tumor.

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National Security
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Leon Panetta: The Battle-Tested Politician

When Leon Panetta was CIA director, he helped lead the effort to find and kill Osama bin Laden.

Now, Panetta may have an even harder job.

He's two months into his tenure as secretary of defense and here's what Panetta has to do: Run two ground wars, keep up the fight against al-Qaida and at the same time figure out how to cut what could end up being a trillion dollars from a Pentagon's budget.

The Laugh

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Africa
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Fears: Terrorists Could Land Looted Gadhafi Weapons

In Libya, there's growing concern over the vast arsenals of weapons that have flooded on to the streets since Moammar Gadhafi's ouster. Warehouses of surface-to-air missiles, mortars and anti-tank mines have been looted.

Soon after the rebels overran the headquarters of Gadhafi's much feared Khamis Brigade on the south side of Tripoli, rebels and ordinary citizens scavenged through a bombed-out warehouse on the base.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Miss. Port Expansion Raises Concern, Hope For Jobs

Anthony and Eunice Crane stand in their backyard in Gulfport, Miss. The new port access road will be built behind their fence. Their home used to back to other homes.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 11:39 am

It's been six years since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, and the rebuilding continues. In Mississippi, the largest project under construction is the Port of Gulfport. Some $500 million in statewide recovery funds are being used to rebuild the port. The state calls it a critical resource, but some residents hit hard by Katrina fear they won't see the benefits.

The Port of Gulfport sits just off Highway 90, a main road that runs all along the coast. Katrina's 30-foot storm surge nearly destroyed this facility, which is the size of about 50 city blocks.

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Animals
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

How A Clever Virus Kills A Very Hungry Caterpillar

A healthy gypsy moth caterpillar on a leaf. Outbreaks of gypsy moths damage roughly 1 million acres of forest in the U.S. each year.
Michael Grove Science/AAAS

Scientists say they have figured out how a very clever virus outwits a very hungry caterpillar.

The caterpillar is the gypsy moth in its larval stage, and the invasive species damages roughly a million acres of forest in the U.S. each year by devouring tree leaves.

But the damage would be greater if it weren't for something called a baculovirus that can infect these caterpillars and cause them to engage in reckless, even suicidal behavior, scientists say. The virus is so effective that the government actually sprays it on trees to help control gypsy moth outbreaks.

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Conflict In Libya
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

NATO's Intervention In Libya: A New Model?

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks in Brussels on Sept. 5. Rasmussen calls NATO's operation in Libya a success that could serve as a model in the future.
Virginia Mayo AP

NATO planes are still in the air and bombing targets over Libya and Moammar Gadhafi is still on the loose. Nonetheless, NATO is taking something of a victory lap in the wake of an operation that broke new ground for the military alliance.

But the Libyan operation also raised questions about its mission, its future role in such conflicts, and how it determines when to intervene.

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen told NPR he sees the Libya operation as a template for future NATO missions and proof the United Nations can outsource its muscle to the alliance.

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Planet Money
10:01 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

The Return Of Toxie

Stephen Neary/Connie Li Chan/Robin Arnott

Last year, as part of a reporting project, we bought a toxic asset — one of those complicated financial instruments that that nearly brought down the global economy.

We spent $1000 of our own money and bought a tiny slice of a bond backed by mortgages. We paid just a fraction of what it originally cost. It was such a good deal, we thought maybe we'd make a few bucks, which we'd give to charity.

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The Two-Way
5:39 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

PHOTOS: Commemorating Sept. 11 In Afghanistan

U.S. soldiers pray during the an anniversary ceremony of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.
John Moore Getty Images

It's been said many times, today: that one of Sept. 11's most significant legacy are the two wars still being fought the by the United States. Perhaps, that's why this set of pictures feels so important. It shows American service members commemorating the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 in simple terms: raising an American flag or bowing in prayer:

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Kids and Sept. 11: The Day 'Children Realized ... Grownups Were Vulnerable'

Keri McMorrow, 7, visits the memorial pool where her uncle's name is engraved, during tenth anniversary ceremonies of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center site.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 5:38 am

It seems there are two types of stories about how children who experienced Sept. 11: First, of course, there are the stories about the children who lost parents on that day, and then there are those who are too young to remember what life was like before the attacks.

NPR's Zoe Chace talked to some of those kids in New York. She filed this report:

Kate Bralauer is 11. She's from Manhattan, she's never seen the skyline with the towers in it. But 9/11 matters to her.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Fighter Jets Scrambled To Escort American Airlines Flight To New York City

NORAD scrambled two F-16 fighter jets to escort an American Airlines flight traveling from Los Angeles to New York, today, after three passengers locked themselves in a bathroom and refused to come out.

The AP reports:

Flight 34 landed safely after 4 p.m. Sunday. The nature of the incident was unclear but a law enforcement official says it isn't thought to be terrorism.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:47 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

How Aaron Brown Became CNN's Voice Of Sept. 11

Aaron Brown reported for 17 straight hours on Sept. 11, 2001.
Courtesy of YouTube

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Aaron Brown came into work at CNN still preparing for his new role as the anchor of the network's flagship evening broadcast. He wasn't supposed to go on air for several more weeks, but on that morning and in the days that followed, Brown became the guide for millions of viewers glued to their television sets.

As he scurried to the roof of CNN's headquarters in New York shortly after the towers were hit, Brown remembers stopping in the middle of 8th Avenue and telling himself to stay calm.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:37 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Reporter Recalls 'Reckless Courage' At Ground Zero

A worker looks over the field of debris of the collapsed south tower area of the World Trade Center in March 2002 in New York City. Many workers chose not to wear the respirators provided for them, except in the most extreme conditions. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt Getty Images

It took journalist and author William Langewiesche several days to get to ground zero after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The airports were closed, and he lived in California.

But as soon as he arrived, he and his editors at the Atlantic Monthly began frantically trying to gain access to the highly restricted site where the Twin Towers had stood.

Langewiesche contacted the head of an obscure city agency, the Department of Design and Construction, Kenneth Holden.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:20 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Ashcroft: War On Terror Won 'One Day At A Time'

Former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft speaks at the Heritage Foundation in 2010 in Washington, DC. Ashcroft spoke about the U.S. Supreme Court's second opportunity to review the rights of Guantanamo detainees.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

John Ashcroft's term as attorney general under George W. Bush was redefined by Sept. 11.

And he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that the techniques endorsed by his Justice Department were necessary, from warrantless wiretaps to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques."

Defending The Patriot Act

One of Ashcroft's most controversial legacies is the Patriot Act, a piece of legislation that dramatically expanded the surveillance capabilities of law enforcement for monitoring terrorism suspects.

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Honoring The Four-Legged Heroes

Susannah George NPR

NPR's Joel Rose was in New Jersey today, where he stumbled upon another Sept. 11 tribute:

A different breed of heroes from September 11th gathered across the Hudson River from Ground Zero. Dozens of service and therapy dogs from around the country gathered with their handlers at Liberty State Park. The event, billed as "Finding One Another," was intended to celebrate the contributions of search and rescue dogs on 9/11 and since.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

VIDEOS: Reading Of The Names, Remembering Those Lost

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 5:39 am

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Lincoln Letter Read By Bush Has Raised Questions Over Years

Though it is widely recognized as "one of the finest pieces of American presidential prose," as The Associated Press wrote in 2008, the "Bixby Letter" that President George W. Bush read this morning during the Sept. 11 memorial service in New York City has been the subject of several questions over the years.

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Africa
9:49 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Rebels Face Resistance From Pro-Gadhafi Forces

A Libyan National Transitional Council fighter keeps watch from atop his rocket launcher during a patrol mission near Wadi Bei, near the western city of Misrata, on Sunday.
Francisco Leong AFP/Getty Images

Libyan rebels are massed Sunday outside two cities that remain in the hands of forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Rebels tried to advance Saturday on the town of Bani Waleed, about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli, but the advance was aborted, apparently to clear the way for NATO airstrikes on loyalist positions.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Sun September 11, 2011

At Ground Zero, Families Are Exploring The New Quiet Space

Family members of the victims entered the 9/11 Memorial Plaza for the first time today.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Brendan Banaszak tells us that at Ground Zero, families of those killed there are already turning the new memorial into a quiet place of remembrance.)

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Musical Moment: Paul Simon Sings 'The Sound Of Silence'

At the World Trade Center earlier today.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's another musical moment from the ceremony in New York.

Singer/songwriter Paul Simon performed his class The Sound of Silence.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Sun September 11, 2011

In New Jersey: A Sunrise Ceremony To Remember Sept. 11 Victims

From New Jersey early today, the view across the Hudson River to the World Trade Center.
Joel Rose NPR

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Joel Rose tells us of an early morning service in New Jersey.)

Across the Hudson River from the World Trade Center, hundreds of people gathered on the New Jersey waterfront for a ceremony to honor the residents of Jersey City who died 10 years ago today.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Sun September 11, 2011

A Musical Moment Of Reflection: Cellist Yo-Yo Ma At Ground Zero

President Obama looked out at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial in New York earlier this morning.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's something quiet.

A short time ago at the memorial service in New York, cellist Yo-Yo Ma performed Sarabande from Bach's First Suite for Cello Solo.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Looking Back 10 Years: President Bush's Address To The Nation

At 8:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed the nation about that day's tragic events. Here's what he said:

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The Two-Way
4:30 am
Sun September 11, 2011

10 Years Later, The Nation Remembers The Sept. 11 Attacks

The "Tribute in Light" illuminates the sky in New York on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:26 am

Today was a day of mourning for the country. The 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 was marked by prayers, solemn ceremonies, vows to remember the victims and pledges to never let terrorists fundamentally change the American way of life.

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The Two-Way
4:25 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Nearly 80 Americans Wounded, Two Afghans Killed In Attack On Base

A truck bombing at an American base in eastern Afghanistan late Saturday killed two Afghan civilians — one of them a 3-year-old girl — and wounded nearly 80 U.S. military personnel, The Associated Press reports.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

According to the AP:

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:14 am
Sun September 11, 2011

San Diego Muslims Open Doors Amid Scrutiny

Parents bring their children to school near a mosque at the Islamic Center of San Diego, Sept. 19, 2001. The current head of the center says before Sept. 11 the Muslim community was insular. He now hosts interfaith meetings and participates in community groups.
David McNew Getty Images

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, the Muslim community in San Diego, Calif., drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali Muslim community were arrested. They've been charged with aiding a Somali terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in San Diego in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

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