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It's All Politics
6:51 am
Wed September 14, 2011

GOP's Bob Turner Wins Weiner's House Seat In N.Y. Upset

Republicans had reasons to cheer and Democrats to despair Wednesday with the upset special election victory in New York City of a Republican retired businessman who will complete the congressional term of Anthony Weiner, the Democrat who exited the U.S. House because of a sexting scandal.

Bob Turner, a 70-year old former cable television executive, beat David Weprin, a 55-year old, state assemblyman, in a district which had, until Tuesday, been reliably Democratic for nearly 100 years.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Retail Sales And Wholesale Prices Unchanged In August

A sharp drop in energy costs helped keep prices at the wholesale level unchanged in August vs. July, the Bureau of Labor Statistics just reported.

According to BLS, while food costs went up 1.1 percent, energy costs fell 1 percent.

Still, over the 13 months ended Aug. 31 the producer price index rose 6.5 percent, BLS added.

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The Two-Way
6:10 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Release Of American Hikers Not Imminent, Iran's Judiciary Says

The limits of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's authority appear to be showing again with word from that country's official news outlet that:

"Iran's Judiciary has rejected recent media reports on the imminent release of the two American nationals that were convicted of spying on behalf of the United States."

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Democrats Suffer 'Demoralizing' Defeats In New York And Nevada

"Republicans pulled off an upset in Tuesday's special election in New York City to replace former congressman Anthony Weiner," NPR's Joel Rose reports. "Bob Turner claimed victory over Democrat David Weprin."

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Inside Kabul Siege Site:Attackers' Bodies, Walls Riddled With Bullet Holes

Afghan Security personnel stand above the body of one attacker, on the 10th floor of the building in Kabul from which RPGs and other weapons were fired.
David Gilkey NPR

An attack on the U.S. embassy and other buildings in the heart of Kabul's diplomatic district that lasted 20 hours is now over.

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Animals
2:50 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Born To Prey: Watch T. Rex Come Alive

Kent Stevens & Scott Ernst University of Oregon/Vizme

Tyrannosaurus rex roamed the Earth some 65 million years ago. In the century since the first skeleton was unearthed in Montana, our understanding of how the giant predator lived, moved and behaved has evolved. Watch the videos below to see the latest T. rex research in motion.

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Conflict In Libya
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Freedoms Flourish On Walls Across Tripoli

Caricatures of the ousted Gadhafi have sprung up all over Tripoli. This image of Gadhafi in chains is on a wall in the capital's Fashlum neighborhood.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 6:14 pm

In Tripoli, residents are painting the town red, green and black, the new colors of the Libyan revolution.

Under Moammar Gadhafi, the regime strictly controlled the images that were allowed in public. Storefronts had to be painted green. English was banned on signs. Anti-regime graffiti was quickly painted over and could be met with a harsh response.

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Sweetness And Light
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

The NCAA And The So-Called 'Student-Athlete'

The NCAA lost control of college football contracts in the 1980s, forcing it to rely on fees paid to broadcast its annual basketball tournament. Here, CBS broadcasters Jim Nantz, left, and Clark Kellogg interview North Carolina coach Roy Williams and player Ty Lawson after a 2009 game.
Joe Murphy Getty Images

Sports fans love to designate certain games as "the greatest ever," the "match of the century" and so forth. Well, I would like to state that a piece in the October issue of The Atlantic Monthly, which was released online Tuesday, may well be the most important article ever written about college sports.

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Animals
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Bone To Pick: First T. Rex Skeleton, Complete At Last

When the T. rex skeleton was first put on display, it was presented standing vertically, in this Godzilla-like pose, as seen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History around 1950. Recent studies show the dinosaur actually kept its body horizontal. Watch the videos here to see how T. rex walked.
Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The back rooms of museums are like your grandparents' attic, only the stuff is more exotic — things like fossilized jellyfish, dinosaur eggs, or mummified princes.

And if you look carefully, you'll find objects that once changed science but are now largely forgotten. You might call them Lost Treasures of Science. This is a story of one of those objects — a special bone that's part of a special skeleton.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Fatal Car Crashes Drop For 16-Year-Olds, Rise For Older Teens

Richard Meehan, 16, with his car at his home in Shelton, Conn in 2008. Researchers say tougher licensing laws have led to fewer fatal car crashes involving 16-year-old drivers.
Bob Child ASSOCIATED PRESS

Terrified to see your teenager behind the wheel? You're not alone. But a new study finds tougher state licensing laws have led to a decrease in fatal accidents, at least among 16-year-olds. That's the good news.

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Politics
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

GOP Opposes Obama Call To Pay For Jobs With Taxes

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 1:21 pm

Republicans aren't exactly crazy about the public works spending President Obama proposes in his $447 billion jobs bill sent to Congress this week, but they are even less enamored with how the president wants to pay for it: by ending a slew of tax breaks for wealthy individuals and corporations.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Palestinians Seek To End Stalemate With U.N. Bid

As the Palestinians plan to make a bid for statehood at the United Nations next week, many Palestinians see it as a way to break years of deadlock with Israel.

The Israelis, meanwhile, see only diplomatic fallout and the potential for violence.

For Palestinians, the U.N. plan is loaded with symbolism. The central post office in the Palestinian city of Ramallah is issuing a series of commemorative stamps and postcards this month. For the first time, they will identify the country of origin as Palestine.

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Politics
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Republican Wins N.Y. Democrat Weiner's House Seat

Bob Turner, center, joined by his wife Peggy, right, and family smiles as he delivers his victory speech during an election night party in New York. Turner says his shocking win in a heavily Democratic New York City district is a "loud and clear" message to Washington.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 6:28 am

Republicans pulled off an upset in Tuesday's special election in New York City to replace former congressman Anthony Weiner. Bob Turner claimed victory over Democrat David Weprin.

Democrats hold a 3-1 registration advantage in the district that spans parts of Queens and Brooklyn. And they put scores of volunteers to work canvassing, but none of it was enough to stop Turner.

"We've been asked by the people of this district to send a message to Washington, and I hope they hear it loud and clear," Turner said in his victory speech shortly after midnight.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Merkel Tries To Reassure Markets On Chance Of Greek Default

A day after her finance minister said the possibility of an "orderly default" by Greece should be on the table, German Chancellor Angela Merkel sought to reassure markets by saying that Germany will continue to finance Greece.

As The Wall Street Journal explains it, what Merkel is saying is that Europe will not allow Greece to be forced to declare bankruptcy or leave the eurozone. The paper adds:

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The Two-Way
4:40 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

NYPD Investigating Officers' Dirty Dancing

A New York City police man seen dancing in a video.
screenshot WorldStarHipHop

We're breaking from the serious news for a few minutes to bring you a bit from New York City, where a group of New York City's finest may be in hot water for having a little too much fun at the city's West Indian American Carnival parade.

The parade happened Sept. 5, but after a video of the dancing uniformed cops was posted on the website WorldStarHipHop and then went viral on YouTube, the New York City Police Department announced today it was launching an investigation.

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Economy
3:56 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Census: 2010 Saw Poverty Rate Increase, Income Drop

The nation's poverty rate rose last year to 15.1 percent, up from 14.3 in 2009, according to a new report from the Census Bureau.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 1:33 am

The nation's poverty rate rose last year to 15.1 percent, the highest level in 17 years, according to new data from the Census Bureau. The agency's latest poverty report, released Tuesday, shows that 46 million people were poor and that the median income dropped last year by more than two percent to about $49,445.

Not unexpectedly, the continued lack of jobs was the main cause.

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

How Paying $5 Million For Lunch With Warren Buffett Paid Off

Warren Buffett.
Seth Wenig AP

Ted Weschler of Charlottesville, Va., paid $2.6 million dollars at a charity auction in both 2010 and 2011 to have lunch with Warren Buffett.

In a press release, yesterday, Berkshire Hathaway announced that Weschler was joining Buffett and another partner to manage some of Berkshire's equity holdings. But the interesting part comes later in the release, when the company says:

Warren Buffett, Berkshire's Chairman, will continue, however, to manage most of the funds until his retirement.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:54 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Pediatricians Fact-Check Bachmann's Bashing of HPV Vaccine

Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann during a Republican presidential debate Monday in Tampa, Fla.
Mike Carlson AP

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 3:30 pm

Now the nation's pediatricians have waded deep and early into the race for the presidency. In an unusual instance of political fact-checking of a candidate's statements by physicians themselves, the American Academy of Pediatrics has a tough prescription for Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann: Get your facts straight on the HPV vaccine.

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Economy
3:54 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

A Potential Super Hero For The Supercommittee

Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf testifies before the supercommittee on Capitol Hill on Sept. 13.
J. Scott Applewhite ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tuesday's hearing in the supercommittee was supposed to be about the history of the current debt crisis. Almost nothing causes more partisan bickering than that. Each party is fervent in its belief about who drove the government into the ditch — namely, the other guys.

On Tuesday, however, Doug Elmendorf, the man who runs the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO), immediately dispensed with the question of blame and laid out the options for the supercommittee.

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Economy
2:55 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Businesses In Joplin, Mo., Find Economic Opportunity

Anthony Owens, right, repairs the roof of a tornado damaged home with James Davis, left, and Dwain Payne on July 30 in Joplin, Mo. All three men came up from Mobile, Ala., looking for work following the May 22 tornado that devastated Joplin, killing 160 people and destroying 7,500 homes and as many as 500 businesses.
Scott Olson Getty Images

It's been nearly four months since a tornado slammed into Joplin, Mo., destroying about one-third of the city. More than 525 businesses were in the direct path of the storm.

Now as they rebuild, business owners are seeing some opportunities in the wake of their tremendous losses.

'Can Do' Attitude

After the tornado hit, the building that housed the Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy in Joplin was destroyed. A safe used to store narcotics was one of the only things to survive and even it got knocked over by the powerful winds.

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Middle East
2:38 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Palestinian Plan Puts U.S. In A Bind

A Palestinian flag is raised in front of European Union headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, on Monday. The Palestinians are expected to seek statehood at the United Nations next week.
John Thys AFP/Getty Images

The Obama administration is scrambling to head off what it fears will be a diplomatic train wreck at the United Nations next week.

After years of gridlock in Mideast negotiations, the Palestinians plan to seek U.N. membership as a state on territory captured by Israel in the 1967 war. That territory includes the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem, and the plan would go through the Security Council, where the U.S. has already promised to use its veto.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

What A Year: Disasters Have Been Declared In All But Two States

Volunteer firefighter Jason Collard at a wildfire in Strawn, Texas, in April.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Partisans on both sides continue to argue over whether to put more money into the coffers of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is running short of cash because there have been so many tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and other natural disasters this year.

The political bickering is nothing new, of course.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:03 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

The 'Next Big Step': Preventing 1 Million Heart Attacks And Strokes

iStockphoto.com

They're calling it Million Hearts – a newly launched campaign to put a half-dozen simple and proven public health strategies into wider practice. Federal health officials say it can prevent a million heart attacks and strokes between now and 2016.

Federal officials call it "the next big step" in cardiovascular prevention. There's lots of evidence it's an achievable goal.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

James Murdoch Recalled By British Parliament

James Murdoch, News Corp.'s deputy chief operating officer and the son of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, will face a second round of grilling from the British Parliament.

If you remember, News Corp. has been under fire in Britain over revelations that the now-closed News of the World tabloid had hacked the phones of public and private figures.

The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Napolitano: New TSA Screening Procedure For Fliers Under 12

Janet Napolitano, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, testifies at a hearing on Capitol Hill.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Parents of young children, we have some good news courtesy of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano: In the coming months, most children younger than 12 will no longer be required to take off their shoes when going through airport security.

The AP reported that during testimony before the Senate, Napolitano also said children will less frequently be subject to pat-downs from Transportation Security Administration officials.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:26 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

The Churn Behind The Stable Rate For The Uninsured

At first glance, today's report from the U.S. Census Bureau on the number of Americans without health insurance in 2010 looks, well, a little dull. About 16.3 percent of people in the country were without health insurance, which "was not statistically different from the rate in 2009," the report points out.

But dig a little deeper and there's plenty of action.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Painting Of A Burning Bank Fetches $25,000 At Auction

Chase Burning, an oil on canvas painting by Alex Schaefer.
Alex Schaefer via Ebay

One California artist has made some serious money with a series of paintings that have struck a chord internationally. In an auction on Ebay, Alex Schaefer sold a 22-by-28 inch oil painting of a burning Chase Bank branch in Los Angeles for $25,200.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Ron Paul: It's Not Government's Job To Take Care Of Uninsured

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul speaks during the presidential debate sponsored by CNN and The Tea Party Express at the Florida State fairgrounds on September 12, 2011 in Tampa, Florida.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 1:53 pm

One question at last night's Republican presidential debate has the Internet abuzz. Not really for what Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) said but for the reaction of a few people in the Tea Party crowd.

This was the question from CNN's Wolf Blitzer:

"A healthy 30-year-old young man has a good job, makes a good living, but decides, you know what? I'm not going to spend $200 or $300 a month for health insurance because I'm healthy, I don't need it. But something terrible happens, all of a sudden he needs it.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Al-Qaida Is Weakened, But Remains A 'Serious Threat,' Petraeus Says

CIA Director David Petraeus (right) and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying earlier today (Sept. 13, 2011).
Mark Wilson Getty Images

"The CIA assesses that, 10 years after the 9/11 attacks, the United States continues to face a serious threat from al-Qaida and its worldwide network of affiliates and sympathizers," even though the terrorist organization "has been weakened," CIA Director David Petraeus told Congress today in his first testimony since taking over the top job at the intelligence agency.

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