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Election 2012
6:00 am
Sat August 13, 2011

Iowa Straw Poll Offers First Sip Of 2012

Later Saturday in Ames, Iowans will cast their ballots in the state's quadrennial straw poll, considered the first ballot-box test of the 2012 presidential field. NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea reports on the tradition and this year's politics.

Shots - Health Blog
5:38 am
Sat August 13, 2011

Don't Get In A Pickle: Learn To Can Food Safely

Canning your own food is a timeworn practice that's back in vogue.
iStockphoto.com

Call it a reaction to high food prices, food recalls, and a bad economy. Or just call it retro chic. But there's no doubt canning is newly trendy among people who a couple of years ago probably didn't give much thought to what goes into a jar.

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It's All Politics
5:05 am
Sat August 13, 2011

Are Michele Bachmann's Best Days On Campaign Trail Nearly Past?

Rep. Michele Bachmann greets a voter in Pella, Iowa.
Liz Halloran NPR

DES MOINES — These sunny August days in Iowa may prove to be Michele Bachmann's best as a GOP presidential candidate.

On the eve of the state's Republican straw poll in Ames, where she is expected to either win or place, the Minnesota congresswoman hop-scotched central Iowa.

She charmed about 100 supporters and the curious in the tidy, Dutch-and-proud town of Pella, and drew easily the largest crowd of any GOP candidates speaking at the Iowa State Fair.

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Around the Nation
4:38 am
Sat August 13, 2011

Adventure, Equality Draw Women To The Coast Guard

The Coast Guard Academy class of 2015 is about one-third women.
Kimberly R. Smith Courtesy U.S. Coast Guard

Originally published on Sat August 13, 2011 10:56 am

This summer, Rear Adm. Sandy Stosz took over as superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, becoming the first woman to run a military academy in the nation's history.

This year's class is about one-third women, a higher percentage than at any of the other military academies. The Coast Guard is the only military service where woman can do any type of job, and that's a big appeal for many.

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Economy
4:37 am
Sat August 13, 2011

Nonprofits Watch Anxiously As Market Wobbles

Henry Street Settlement provides a range of social services for low-income New Yorkers, including a summer day camp for children. Corporate donations to the agency fell off after the 2008 financial crisis.
Will Deitz Henry Street Settlement

The turmoil on Wall Street threatens to wreak financial havoc on a lot of people and institutions — including the country's 1.2 million nonprofits. Charities of all sizes are only beginning to recover from the recession. Now many are wondering how they'll survive another market plunge.

Camp Henry on Manhattan's Lower East Side is run by the venerable Henry Street Settlement, which provides a range of social services for low-income New Yorkers. Executive Director David Garza says after the 2008 financial crisis, corporate donations to the agency fell off.

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Middle East
4:36 am
Sat August 13, 2011

In Yemen's South, Islamists Gain Ground

Yemenis walk past Saint Anthony Church in the southern city of Aden in 2010. Two months ago, tens of thousands of residents fled to Aden from their homes in Zinjibar after militants stormed the town. The displaced persons are now camped out in schools in Aden.
KARIM SAHIB AFP/Getty Images

The growing turmoil in Yemen is on display in the southern city of Aden, where tens of thousands of people have sought shelter after fleeing a nearby town that has been taken over by Islamist fighters.

The trouble erupted less than an hour's drive east of Aden, in the town of Zinjibar, about two months ago. Militants rumored to be affiliated with al-Qaida stormed the town, captured government buildings and looted the central bank. Government forces responded with airstrikes.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

'Dougherty Gang' Was Driving A Loaner Car; Tip Came From Former Officers

The decisive tip that brought the capture of three Florida siblings dubbed the "Dougherty Gang" came from two retired officers who were just out to enjoy a day in the San Isabel National Forest, according to new details of their arrest.

And it turns out that one of the brothers will also face a charge of grand theft auto, because the 2006 white Subaru Impreza the trio repeatedly used to flee police was a loaner.

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Middle East
3:03 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Syria's Deadly Crackdown On Protesters Continues

Defying growing international condemnation, Syrian security forces continue their bloody crackdown on anti-government protesters across the country. A U.S.-based human rights group says injured protesters are afraid to seek treatment in government-run hospitals, for fear of being detained and beaten.

Politics
2:10 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Obama Seeks To Rekindle Campaign Passion In 2012

President Obama likes to say that the American economy is facing headwinds: turmoil in Europe, the Arab spring and the tsunami in Japan. His reelection campaign is facing headwinds too: 9 percent unemployment, a U.S. credit downgrade, and a presidential approval rating slipping toward 40 percent.

Despite those daunting numbers, the President plans to convince Americans that he deserves another four years.

During the 2010 midterm campaign, Obama often told audiences that Republicans drove the economy into a ditch, and now they want the keys to the car back.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:08 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Hackers Hijack Websites In Online Pharmacy Scam

Those who search for drug information online may be "drowned out in a sea of rogue results."
iStockphoto.com

People searching for prescription drug information online are being led astray by hackers and redirected to illicit online drug sellers in one out of every three searches.

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Middle East
2:03 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Egyptians See Their Revolution As Mideast Barometer

A protester shouts as Egyptian soldiers stand guard behind barbed wire at the Defense Ministry in Cairo on July 23. Egyptians say their revolution is still not complete, but they believe they are setting the tone for the region.
Mohamed Hossam AFP/Getty Images

After Egyptians toppled President Hosni Mubarak in February, many thought that their revolution, driven by peaceful, mass demonstrations, would be duplicated elsewhere in the Middle East with the same powerful results.

All too soon, they saw on their TV screens that would not be the case, as uprisings in Libya and Syria brought bloodshed and slaughter. That led to uncertainty and fear in Egypt, because many agree with activist Hossam al-Hamalawy, who says that Egypt's revolution cannot fully succeed on its own.

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The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Europe Bans Short Sells, But Will It Work?

France, Spain, Belgium and Italy decided to ban short selling on some stocks for two weeks.

"Some authorities have decided to impose or extend existing short-selling bans in their respective countries," the European Securities and Markets Authority said in a statement. "They have done so either to restrict the benefits that can be achieved from spreading false rumors or to achieve a regulatory level playing field, given the close inter-linkage between some EU markets."

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Business And Economics
1:49 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

In Manhattan, Preschool Interviews Induce Anxiety

Children play with blue foam building blocks at the Blue School in New York City on March 31. The Blue School is one of many competitive private preschools in Manhattan, founded by original members of the Blue Man Group so they could send their own children to a school that they felt supported creative offerings for their children.
Mark Lennihan AP

The value of preschool isn't a surprise to one group of people in America: Some Manhattanites spend $20,000 or $30,000 a year sending their children to preschool.

But before you can even pay the tuition, you have to get in. Competition for a spot at some of Manhattan's most coveted schools is fierce.

And one of the most anxiety-inducing parts of the process for parents is the preschool interview.

'It's Like A Sport'

When you think preschool interview, it's hard not to imagine a job interview for babies. But that's not exactly how it works.

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Politics
1:08 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

The Lone Star State Beginnings Of Rick Perry

Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Texas Education Agency Administrators' Midwinter Conference in Austin, Texas, in 2001.
Deborah Cannon AP

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:32 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry will officially make clear his intentions to run for the GOP presidential nomination during a speech on Saturday in South Carolina. But he has sounded like a candidate for a while.

"Until Washington figures out that the only true stimulus is more money in the hands of employers across all economic sectors, as well as a restrained bureaucracy that is no longer overreaching into the workplaces, our national nightmare will continue," he said in San Antonio this week.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Appeals Court Rejects Part Of Health Care Law

A federal appeals court in Atlanta has ruled against the individual mandate contained in the new health care law, saying it is unconstitutional to require citizens to buy health insurance.

The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Fri August 12, 2011

Debt 'Supercommittee' Members' Top Political Contributors Scrutinized

One day after the U.S. debt "supercommittee" was finalized, the largest political donors to Republicans and Democrats on the panel are being scrutinized — after all, lobbyists are widely expected to court the committee's 12 members, to ensure that their interests stay off the chopping block.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Fri August 12, 2011

U.S. Appeals Court Rules Against Health Care Law

A U.S. appeals court has ruled in favor of 26 states that filed suit to challenge a requirement in President Barack Obama's healthcare law that forced individuals to own health insurance. The law's "individual mandate" portion was declared unconstitutional, according to Reuters.

The court has apparently ruled that the remainder of the law, without the individual mandate, can stand, Reuters reports.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:30 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Regulators Grapple With Outbreaks As Salmonella, E. Coli Illnesses Grow

Ground turkey packages like this one are part of a nationwide recall and are blamed for sickening 107 people so far.
Paul Sakuma ASSOCIATED PRESS

It's been another tough week for food safety.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Former Boston, New York Police Chief In Talks For Scotland Yard Job

William Bratton, who has been the police chief in New York, Boston and Los Angeles, told the AP today that he was in talks with the British government about a job. The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Woman Dies One Month After Being Hit By Cyclist In San Francisco

A woman who had been hospitalized since being struck by a cyclist in San Francisco last month died Thursday, opening the question of what charges, if any, might be filed against the cyclist. Dionette Cherney, a Washington, D.C., resident in her late 60s, suffered a head injury in the crash, from which she did not recover.

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The Picture Show
10:21 am
Fri August 12, 2011

German Exhibit Reveals Secret Spy Photos

Staged photos re-create Stasi agents dressed in various disguises, ranging from a Russian mafioso to the casual middle-aged man to a tourist with cameras.
Simon Menner

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:33 am

The Stasi, or East German secret police, were notorious as one of the most repressive and feared institutions of the East German Communist government — and they left behind an unsettling record. Images include Stasi agents in various disguises as they participated in training in the "art of disguise." Without any context, they are almost amusing. But, as photographer Simon Menner writes, the photos "document the repressive measures taken by a totalitarian state in order to create terror and fear among the population."

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Politics
10:00 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Romney And Bachmann Butt Heads In Iowa

BackTalk
10:00 am
Fri August 12, 2011

BackTalk: Debates, Danziger Bridge, Kid Bans

Originally published on Fri August 12, 2011 11:29 am

Transcript

ALLISON KEYES, host: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Allison Keyes. Michel Martin is away.

Coming up, two hip-hop kings collaborate for the new album "Watch the Throne." But do Kanye West and Jay-Z live up to their royal hype? We'll find out next.

But first, it's time for Backtalk, where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere and get to hear from you, our listeners. Corey Dade is right here with me. He's the national correspondent for NPR Digital News. Welcome back, Corey.

COREY DADE: Hi, Allison.

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Barbershop
10:00 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Barbershop: Can Super Committee Save Sour Economy?

The Barbershop guys weigh in on the Super Committee picks, TBS' cancellation of George Lopez's show and the 25th anniversary of the film "She's Gotta Have It." Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with author Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, syndicated columnist Ruben Navarrette and reporter Gautham Nagesh.

The Two-Way
9:52 am
Fri August 12, 2011

U.S. Skier Kicked Off Team After Alleged Midair Urination Incident

The Associated Press is reporting that the U.S. Ski Team has kicked Robert "Sandy" Vietze off its development squad for what the team said were "conduct violations."

The New York Post reports that Vietze,18, was accused of boarding a JetBlue flight drunk and then urinating on a fellow passenger.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:40 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Captain Morgan, The Rum Pirate, Lends A Knee To Hip Dislocation

If you were to dislocate your hip, you'd need the able hands of a physician to push your thighbone back into the socket where it belongs. But that effort of "reducing" a hip dislocation can be a tricky and even risky task.

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Law
9:09 am
Fri August 12, 2011

The Quiet Revolution In The Death Penalty Debate

A shortage of a key drug for lethal injections has slowed the pace of executions.
Nate Jenkins AP

There are 58 people on federal death row in Terre Haute, Ind. But for now none appears likely to face the ultimate punishment, at least not on President Obama's watch.

The Justice Department is reviewing its lethal injection protocols because of a shortage of a key drug. While that study is underway, authorities have backed away from setting execution dates.

Over the last few years, a quiet revolution has overtaken the death penalty debate. Like many trends, this one started in the states and moved to the federal level, says death penalty expert David Bruck.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Markets Open Higher, As Investors Weigh Positive Retail Numbers

Many investors are probably about ready for this week to end. It's been a cardiac-inducing one that set a record yesterday: For the first time in history the markets swayed more than 400 points four days in a row.

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Business
8:40 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Beyond Bulls And Bears: A Wall Street Bestiary

A vintage illustration of Wall Street, 1908
Library of Congress/Prints and Photographs Division

Lions and vultures and bears, oh my.

Animal imagery has been used since the early 18th century to describe human behavior on Wall Street, says Charles R. Geisst, a professor of finance at Manhattan College and author of Wall Street: A History.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Fri August 12, 2011

Usher Who Took Foul Ball From Boy Was Only Joking, Say Dodgers

Imagine you're a kid — maybe 10-years-old. And you're at a Dodgers game sitting in a prime spot, behind home plate, close enough to hear the grunts of the umpire as deals verdicts on balls and strikes.

Then you hear the crack of a bat, you look up and there it is, your shot at a Major League foul ball. It lands near you, you scramble, you've got it. You're so happy, you jump to your seat clutching a ball that barely fits in your fist.

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