Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

One day after an investigating committee said Russia's athletics system is plagued with rampant and systematic doping problems, the World Anti-Doping Agency has suspended Russia's official sports drug-testing lab.

If you think it's too early for Christmas ads, you're not alone. But the new seasonal spot from British retailer John Lewis is something of a sensation, with nearly 12 million people having watched the tear-jerking video since Thursday.

The head of Egypt's commission investigating last week's crash of a Russian airliner says the jet broke apart in the air, 23 minutes and 14 seconds after taking off from Sharm el-Sheikh's airport. But Ayman al-Muqaddam also says parts of the wreckage are still missing, and that it's still too soon to determine a cause for the crash.

More than 15 years after he was convicted of murdering his ex-girlfriend, Adnan Syed has been granted a hearing to let his lawyers present a possible alibi and questions about cellphone data. Attorneys for Syed, the key figure in the popular podcast Serial, also want to probe "alleged prosecutorial misconduct."

With 42 days having passed since the last negative blood test from an Ebola patient in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization has declared the deadly virus is no longer being transmitted in the country. Ebola killed more than 3,500 people in Sierra Leone's outbreak that began in May of 2014.

Marking the occasion Saturday, Dr. Anders Nordström of the WHO says that in Sierra Leone, "8,704 people were infected and 3,589 have died, 221 of them healthcare workers, all of whom we remember on this day."

Ending a process that has lingered for much of his time in the Oval Office, President Obama announced Friday that the U.S. has rejected TransCanada's application for a permit to complete the Keystone XL pipeline.

A region of southeastern Brazil is struggling to cope with a devastating flood, after two dams broke outside an iron ore mine and sent mineral waste and thick red mud over a large valley.

In a jobs report that may influence the Federal Reserve's decision on interest rates, the Labor Department says that 271,000 jobs were added in October. The unemployment rate fell slightly to 5 percent, according to the report from the agency's Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Two days after all flights between Britain and Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, were suspended, the first of some 20,000 British tourists who were stranded at the Red Sea resort are on their way home. Egyptian officials are restricting the number of flights, after initially canceling all of them, according to U.K. carrier EasyJet.

At first, it was just a bidding war. Then it was more like an actual war, with rival groups drawing blood after an auction of a coveted license plate number in China. The reasons behind the brawl are complex, from a preference for the number 9 to a broader power struggle.

The violence broke out in Huzhou, Zhejiang province, during a public auction of license plate number ED999 – an auspicious number for which one bidder was willing to pay "the jaw-dropping price" of 990,000 yuan (more than $150,000), according to The Shanghaiist, which published a video of the recent dispute.

In adopting a six-year transportation bill to fund highway and transit projects Thursday, the House also approved the revival of the Export-Import Bank, which has been idle since its charter expired in June.

A similar bill has already been approved by the Senate, including a provision that renews the Ex-Im Bank's charter. Before the legislation goes to President Obama, the two chambers will have to iron out differences between the two bills.

The political tempest that has for months swirled around Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane will touch down in a courtroom Thursday, when Kane is questioned about her allegations that a judge leaked sealed documents about the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse case.

In a decision that could open the door to legalizing marijuana in Mexico, that country's supreme court said Wednesday that four plaintiffs should be allowed to grow marijuana for their own use. The four belong to a nonprofit group that hopes to weaken the influence of drug cartels.

Update at 6:10 p.m. ET: British Officials See Bomb As 'Significant' Possibility

Britain has suspended its flights and advised against all but essential travel through the airport at Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, following Saturday's crash of a Russian airliner carrying 224 people in the Sinai Peninsula.

After responding to the scene of a car crash on Halloween, a young Georgia state trooper and his colleagues realized the couple killed in the crash had left behind four young children — who were home alone, wearing their costumes and waiting for their parents.

Faced with a tragic situation, Trooper Nathan Bradley says he stalled for time — to find the kids' nearest relatives, and to figure out how to salvage their Halloween.

Answering calls for accountability over a deadly nightclub fire and facing charges of fraud and tax evasion, Romania's prime minister resigned Wednesday, along with his Cabinet. Thousands of protesters took to the streets of Bucharest on Tuesday night, after the blaze's death toll rose to 32.

The former president of Brazil's soccer federation is due in a U.S. courtroom Tuesday afternoon, after being extradited from Switzerland. Jose Maria Marin was arrested along with top FIFA officials this past spring; he's accused of taking millions of dollars in bribes.

At an arraignment for Marin in a federal courthouse in New York Tuesday afternoon, he pleaded not guilty, The Associated Press reports.

Calling it the largest fine in the history of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx says his agency is imposing a civil penalty of $200 million on Takata over the company's handling of defective air bag inflators.

Nearly a third of the fine — $70 million — is "payable in cash," according to the Department of Transportation. The remaining $130 million would only be levied if Takata either fails to follow through on remedying the situation, or if more problems are uncovered, the agency says.

Announcing what could be a string of projects from the former host of The Daily Show, HBO says it has reached an exclusive four-year deal with Jon Stewart. In the first phase of the deal, Stewart will produce "short-form digital content," HBO says.

"Appearing on television 22 minutes a night clearly broke me," Stewart says in a news release about the deal. "I'm pretty sure I can produce a few minutes of content every now and again."

Browsing for a new book at Amazon now has a new meaning in Seattle, where instead of surfing the Web, customers can walk into the online retailer's first permanent storefront. Opening Tuesday morning, the shop shares a block with a Banana Republic and a Pottery Barn.

The news release touting Amazon Books' opening day also includes details that are unusual for the online retailer: the store's street address and details on where customers can park (in a garage).

Facing their close rival Australia in the finals of the Rugby World Cup, New Zealand's All Blacks are now back-to-back champions, winning 34-17.

In addition to cementing New Zealand's status as the dominant force in rugby today, the historic win makes the All Blacks the first team to win three World Cups — an honor that Australia's Wallabies had been vying for, as well.

Describing the historic win, the New Zealand Herald writes:

Less than two years after being named Alabama's Teacher of the Year, Ann Marie Corgill resigned her post this week, citing her frustration with bureaucracy. After Corgill was moved from teaching second grade to fifth, she was told she wasn't qualified to teach fifth-graders.

In January, Corgill was named one of four finalists for the National Teacher of the Year award. She is a 21-year teaching veteran whose story — and candid resignation letter — has made waves in the education community and beyond.

Months after a secular blogger was hacked to death in Bangladesh's capital, a publisher who published the writer's books has been killed. The attack came hours after men stabbed another of the blogger's publishers, along with two other writers.

Both of the publishers had published the writings of Aijit Roy, a Bangladeshi-American who was hacked to death in February on a sidewalk in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh.

A crowded club in Bucharest became the scene of tragedy Friday night, after a fire broke out, spreading flames and smoke and causing a panic among the young patrons. Romania's government has announced three days of mourning for the 27 people who died.

The blaze reportedly spread from the stage and eventually across the ceiling of the Colectiv nightclub. The fire and the ensuing melee sent more than 180 people to hospitals, according to the Agerpres national news agency.

From Berlin, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports:

Giving new detail to an operation that has been hinted at in recent days, the White House says President Obama has authorized the deployment of a small number of U.S. Special Operations Forces troops — fewer than 50 — to help fight ISIS in Syria.

Responding to a U.S. request to turn over film director Roman Polanski to answer charges that he had sex with a minor in 1977, a court in Krakow, Poland, has denied the request. The court held months of hearings over the request; its decision could still be overturned.

The judge in the case, Dariusz Mazur, said the U.S. request wasn't admissible under Polish law. Polanski, 82, has both French and Polish citizenship.

For the first time, Iran is joining international talks on Syria's future, sending a team to meet with diplomats Friday in Vienna. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says he's hopeful about a process that he calls "very difficult."

Much of that difficulty lies in finding a solution to the civil war and humanitarian crisis in Syria that's acceptable to all parties — both within and outside of Syria.

A teenage girl is believed to have contracted bubonic plague from a flea on a hunting trip, according to Oregon health officials. The Crook County girl got sick five days after the trip started on Oct. 16; she's been hospitalized in Bend, Ore., since Oct. 24.

The U.S. State Department says it is looking into reports that an Iranian-American businessman has been detained by Iranian security forces, after The Wall Street Journal reported that Dubai-based Siamak Namazi was arrested at a Tehran airport.

Stories about classical music that appeared on NPR's website have been found to include portions of others' work, according to a joint statement by NPR and member station WQXR, where the writer of those reports was based. The 10 articles were submitted over a period of several years.