Corey Dade

Corey Dade is a national correspondent for the NPR Digital News team. With more than 15 years of journalism experience, he writes news analysis about federal policy, national politics, social trends, cultural issues and other topics for NPR.org.

Prior to NPR, Dade served as the Atlanta-based southern politics and economics reporter at The Wall Street Journal for five years. During that time he covered many of the nation's biggest news stories, including the BP oil spill, the Tiger Woods scandal and the 2008 presidential election, having traveled with the Obama and McCain campaigns. He also covered the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings and Hurricane Katrina, which led to a nine-month special assignment in New Orleans.

At the Journal, Dade also told the stories at the intersection of politics, culture and commerce, such as the Obama presidency's potential to reframe race in America and the battle between African-American and Dominican hair salons for control of the billion-dollar black consumer market.

Dade began his reporting career at The Miami Herald, writing about curbside newspaper racks and other controversies roiling the retirement town of Hallandale, Fla., pop. 30,000. He later covered local and state politics at the Detroit Free Press, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

No stranger to radio, over the years Dade has been a frequent guest commentator and analyst on NPR news, talk and information programs and on several cable TV networks.

As a student at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Dade played football for legendary coach Eddie Robinson. He then transferred to his eventual alma mater, the University of Maryland.

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It's All Politics
9:46 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Perry Sees 'No Viable Path Forward': The Fall Of A Once Promising Front-Runner

Perry prepares to speak with voters attending the West Des Moines caucus in Iowa on Jan. 3.
Jonathan Gibby Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 12:40 pm

Like the saying goes in his home state, everything about Texas Gov. Rick Perry's presidential campaign was big.

From the start of his candidacy, when he garnered instant front-runner status in some polls, to his embarrassing debate performances and his slide to the back of the pack, Perry's bid for the Republican nomination seemed outsized. So, too, were the expectations.

On Thursday, Perry left the GOP race and strongly endorsed former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, citing his "heart of a conservative reformer."

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Presidential Race
9:23 am
Mon January 16, 2012

Unable To Gain Traction, Jon Huntsman Drops Out

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, flanked by his wife, Mary Kaye, announced Monday at the Myrtle Beach Convention Center in South Carolina that he is ending his run for the Republican presidential nomination.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 16, 2012 9:57 am

Jon Huntsman billed himself as the Harley-riding, mild-mannered candidate of civility. But his moderate positions never registered with Republican primary voters and left him languishing in the polls.

Huntsman, 51, ended his bid for the Republican presidential nomination Monday after struggling to keep pace in a largely conservative field. He also failed to distinguish himself as the Mitt Romney alternative, unable to escape the shadow of the other millionaire former governor and Mormon in the race.

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It's All Politics
4:07 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Obama's Most Vocal Black Critics Dial Back Attacks As Election Year Begins

Princeton professor Cornel West (right) and talk show host Tavis Smiley (left) on their 18-city poverty tour on Oct. 9, 2011.
JIM RUYMEN UPI /Landov

The dynamic duo of PBS host Tavis Smiley and professor/activist Cornel West was it again in Washington Thursday evening during a live television broadcast of a program addressing poverty.

The two have made a traveling roadshow out of their roles as the loudest African-American critics of President Obama.

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Politics
10:17 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Political Battle Brewing Over New Voter ID Laws

Verdell Winder of Washington holds up his driver's license showing his "I Voted" sticker after voting on Election Day on Nov. 4, 2008.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 7:58 pm

As the presidential campaign kicks into high gear, a fight is brewing over stricter voting laws that could affect turnout and influence general election results in battleground states.

New laws in several states will require millions of voters to show photo identification when they cast ballots this year, the result of a nationwide push mostly by Republicans who claim the measures will prevent election fraud. Democrats and voting rights activists oppose the laws, arguing that they are unnecessary because voter fraud is rare.

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It's All Politics
2:48 pm
Tue December 27, 2011

Playing The Expectations Game And Other Last-Minute Candidate Tricks

Texas Gov. Rick Perry walks to his bus after a campaign stop at the Glenn Miller Museum in Clarinda, Iowa on Dec. 27.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:10 am

In this final week before the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3, each of the Republican presidential candidates is starting an all-out scramble to shore up support in a contest that's still up for grabs.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney are competing for the votes of moderate, mainstream Republicans. Both of them have spent time at the top of the polls.

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It's All Politics
9:34 am
Tue December 13, 2011

New Poll Suggests Latino Voters See 'Hostile' GOP

Nearly half of the Latino voters in a new survey said nominating Sen. Marco Rubio as a vice presidential candidate would have no effect on their votes.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 2:07 pm

The overwhelming majority of Latino voters believe that the Republican Party ignores them or is outright "hostile," and that nominating Hispanic Sen. Marco Rubio as a vice presidential candidate might do little to change it, according to a national poll released Monday.

The December survey, conducted by impreMedia and the polling group Latino Decisions, is the first to test the popularity of the freshman senator from Florida with America's Hispanics.

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News
10:14 am
Wed December 7, 2011

Joining Forces With The Left, Occupy Swarms Capitol

Hundreds of demonstrators marched on Capitol Hill Tuesday to occupy the offices of their members of Congress during the "Take Back the Capitol" protest in Washington, DC. On Wednesday, they plan to target K Street.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

After bringing their grievances to the doors of Congress on Tuesday, protesters from across the nation plan to take aim at Washington's other vilified powerbrokers: lobbyists.

By lunchtime on Wednesday, storied K Street, which is home to the lobbying arms of many large corporations and industries, is expected to be choked with as many as 3,000 community activists, unemployed protesters, union members and Occupy Wall Street participants.

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Politics
2:26 pm
Fri December 2, 2011

Why Recall Elections Are So Difficult To Pull Off

Supporters of recalling Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker march toward the state elections board office to deliver required paperwork to launch the effort in Madison on Nov. 15.
Scott Bauer AP

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 11:00 am

When the word "recall" makes headlines, it usually involves the removal of a defective product from store shelves or perhaps the testimony of some nervous executive at a congressional hearing saying, "I don't recall."

But 2011 has been the year of another kind of recall: the recall election. Angry at elected officials' handling of the economy, budget cuts and other issues, voters across America are taking the "Throw the bums out" approach to new heights.

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Economy
2:41 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

Stocks Soar, But How Strong Is The Economy?

The U.S. economy is experiencing its strongest across-the-board growth of the year, as private companies hire more people, some manufacturers expand and the stock market surges on a plan to ease Europe's financial crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 490 points Wednesday, an increase of more than 4 percent.

But analysts say the economy isn't growing robustly enough to lower unemployment, stem government layoffs or revive a housing market that remains extremely weak.

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News
9:37 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Have The Crackdowns On Immigration Gone Too Far?

Protesters march outside the Alabama Capitol during a demonstration against the state's immigration law in Montgomery, Ala., on Nov. 15.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 2:29 pm

The architect of Arizona's controversial immigration law has been voted out of office. That law and similar statutes are undergoing difficult court challenges. And the strictest law, in Alabama, has ignited a withering backlash expected to force major changes.

Have the crackdowns on illegal immigration finally gone too far?

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It's All Politics
4:07 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Sen. Marco Rubio Denies Embellishing His Background As A Cuban Exile

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio on Friday lambasted the Washington Post for an article claiming that he "embellished" the facts of his parents' emigration to the U.S..

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Mitt Romney
2:22 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

With Romney In Race, Mormon Church Steps Up Ads

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An "I'm A Mormon" billboard in New York's Times Square in June.The LDS church expanded the ad campaign to 12 new cities within the last week.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 3:59 pm

Just as former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney tries to overcome unease about his Mormon faith in his bid for the Republican presidential nomination, a new ad campaign promoting the religion is drawing attention.

"I'm a Mormon" billboards and television commercials aimed at improving the religious group's public image have surfaced over the past week in states almost certain to be battlegrounds for next year's presidential contest.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Interactive: How Latinos Are Reshaping Communities

NPR

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 11:21 am

Over the past decade, the story of population growth in the United States was defined largely by the story of Latinos emerging as the nation's largest minority.

They surpassed African-Americans for that distinction, by accounting for 56 percent of America's growth from 2000 to 2010. They now number more than 50 million. Put another way, 1 in every 6 U.S. residents is Latino.

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Around the Nation
12:51 pm
Fri September 30, 2011

Data On Same-Sex Couples Reveal Changing Attitudes

Ryan Witmer (left) and Jhonmar Castillo wait with other couples to exchange vows in a civil union ceremony June 2 in Chicago's Millennium Park. New data from the U.S. census may reveal as much about changing attitudes as about changing numbers.
Scott Olson Getty Images

As bans on gay marriage and civil unions spread across the majority of America in the past decade, new U.S. Census figures reveal a starkly different trend: The number of same-sex partnerships skyrocketed even in the most prohibitive states.

Some 646,464 gay couples said they lived together in last year's census, an increase of 80 percent from 2000, according to revised figures released this week. Same-sex couples make up just 1 percent of all married and unmarried couples in the U.S., but as a group they nonetheless made large gains in every state.

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U.S.
6:43 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Five Ways The Postal Service Could Reinvent Itself

U.S. Postal Service mail delivery trucks sit idle at the Manassas Post Office in Virginia on September 5.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

By the end of September, the U.S. Postal Service will be on the brink of defaulting on its employee pension obligations, unable to borrow more money and have just enough cash to cover operations for a week.

Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe issued the warning to a Senate committee on Tuesday as he pleaded with Congress to intervene before Sept. 30 by granting him unprecedented authority to make radical changes that could steer the agency from financial ruin. He said the Postal Service could report losses of up to $10 billion for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30.

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It's All Politics
3:46 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

What Should Be In Obama's Jobs Plan? Six Ideas That Could Make The List

When President Obama unveils his jobs plan to Congress next week, he'll have to balance his desire for spending on programs that might stimulate the economy against the nation's current appetite for cost cutting. We examine the pros, cons and politics of six proposals that might make Obama's list:

Extension of the payroll tax "holiday"

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Politics
1:22 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

King Friend: Democrats Should 'Love Their Enemies'

The unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial in Washington, D.C., this week has brought attention to the slain leader's former lieutenants, many of whom became iconic figures in the civil rights movement.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

After Quake, Rush To Phone Loved Ones Overwhelmed Networks

People reach for their cellphones outside the courthouse in Manhattan after an earthquake rattled the East Coast on Tuesday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

After an earthquake shook the East Coast on Tuesday, many people reached for their cellphones and tried to call loved ones. And many couldn't get through — but it wasn't the earthquake's fault.

No damaged cell towers or wires were reported by the major mobile carriers following the quake, which struck just before 2 p.m. EST and registered a magnitude of 5.8 at its epicenter in Virginia.

So what caused the problems?

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News
8:54 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Behind King Memorial, One Fraternity's Long Battle

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial opened to the public on Monday. It will be officially dedicated on Sunday.
Allison Keyes NPR

The thousands of visitors at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington this week will reflect on the controversial likeness of the man, his legacy and the significance of the first nonpresident — and first African-American — immortalized on the National Mall.

But most of them probably won't know who built it.

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Politics
1:31 pm
Thu August 11, 2011

In A Twitter World, Do We Still Need Debates?

As the Republican presidential hopefuls converge on Iowa this week for Thursday night's debate and Saturday's influential straw poll, we caught up with Republican strategist Marc Lampkin, deputy campaign manager for George W. Bush's 2000 presidential bid and a former staffer to Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) years before he became House speaker. His thoughts on the unofficial kickoff to the GOP primaries:

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