Miles Bryan


Phone: 307-766-5086

Miles previously worked at American Public Media’s Marketplace and National Public Radio’s Los Angeles bureau. His work has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and on public radio stations across the Northwest. Miles grew up in Minneapolis. He moonlights as a rock guitarist.

Ways to Connect

Miles Bryan

A group of UW student protestors called “BreakthrUWYO” staged a walkout of a discussion on diversity put on by the school and attended by UW president Dick McGinity Tuesday night.


Miles Bryan

26-year-old Cameron Largent lives with his mother in a big suburban house in Rock Springs. His favorite spot at home is the basement couch, where he’s set up to play the fantasy video game World of Warcraft.

“I’m a priest,” he says. “So my job is to run around and heal people. [my character] is the highest level you can get: level 100.”

Largent has had a lot of time to level up recently: he has been sober for six months. It’s the longest he has gone without drinking for years.

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

The National Park Service's draft plan for the Moose-Wilson corridor road in Grand Teton National Park is getting mixed reviews.

The 674-page  plan lays out four alternatives for the road, but endorses “Alternative C.” That plan would limit the number of cars allowed to be on the road, pave the road to provide for better bicycle access, and add a new ranger kiosk, among other things.

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Radio

Listen to the full show here.  

Wyoming's Revenue Picture Will Lead To A Lean Budget

The Consensus Revenue Estimating group or CREG will release its much-anticipated revenue forecast on Tuesday. Wyoming’s revenues are expected to drop 500 to 600 million dollars, which means legislators will have a lot less money to spend compared to the last budget. 

Miles Bryan

When 25-year-old graduate student Jordan Bishop moved into his apartment near the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie he bought a television, and signed up for broadband internet. But cable? No way.

“I always just knew it was going to be too expensive, so I didn’t even look at setting it up,” he says. “And I never cared about having hundreds of channels.”  

Instead, Bishop got an Apple TV. He watches his favorite shows with Netflix, and uses Apple’s streaming movie service to rent flicks.

Miles Bryan

Historical horse racing machines will remain shut down in Wyoming for at least weeks, and more likely a few months.

Since the machines were legalized in Wyoming in 2013, they’ve brought in tens of millions in revenue for the horse racing industry—and generated millions in taxes for the state. Historical horse racing machines currently exist at more than a dozen locations throughout the state.

Wyoming Secretary of State Ed Murray says he wants the state’s next Elections Director to focus on improving voter registration and turnout.

This comes after the state’s longtime Elections Director, Peggie Nighswonger, resigned from the post last month, citing philosophical differences with Murray. Nighswonger said in an interview with WPR that Secretary Murray is focusing too much on voter registration programs, and not spending enough time preparing for the 2016 elections.

Longtime Wyoming chief election official Peggy Nighswonger has resigned, citing what she calls philosophical differences with Secretary of State Ed Murray.

Nighswonger, who has overseen elections in the state for almost twenty years as the state Elections Director, says she had been planning to stay on through the 2016 elections so she could mentor a replacement. But she says she was unable to do that while working under Murray.

Historical horse racing machines will remain shut down in Wyoming for at least weeks, and more likely a few months.


Miles Bryan

Many of us begin our day by watching the garage door open.

It’s creaking sound usually doesn’t mean anything special: time for another morning commute, or maybe some yard work if it’s the weekend. But for Jack Schulte, the sound of the garage door opening inspires brings up far less mundane feelings.

“It makes me ready,” he says. “To break the surly bonds of gravity.”

Miles Bryan

People in Pinedale have a lot to say about their mayor, Bob Jones—and not much of it is nice.

Longtime councilman Tim Lingle says his day-to-day has become much more hostile since the new mayor took over.

“Do I hate him? I think that’s a bit strong,” Lingle says. “Do I wish we kept our old Mayor? Absolutely.”

Mayor Jones has also made enemies with some of the small town’s business leaders—like Tamra Watts, who runs Pinedale’s popular Wind River Brewery and restaurant.

Pew Charitable Trusts

Wyoming lawmakers should consider almost doubling the state’s rainy day reserve fund if they want to be assured that the fund would be enough to weather an economic downturn.

That’s one of the main takeaways a presentation from the research arm of the Pew Charitable Trusts to Wyoming’s Joint Revenue Interim Committee Friday in Buffalo.  

Miles Bryan


H+S Coffee Head Roaster Coulter Sunderman has some advice for how you should consume your morning cup of coffee: remember to slurp.

“You want to slurp,” Sunderman says before a coffee tasting at H+S’s space in downtown Laramie. “It aerates the coffee across your tongue.”

The tasting would be familiar to anyone who's been to a wine tasting: the gathered coffee fans sample six unmarked cups, and toss out tasting notes like “cashew,” “peanut butter,” and “cola.”

Miles Bryan

Let’s start in 2011, when Wyoming was rocked by an investigation from the national news agency Reuters entitled, A Little House on the Secrets on the Great Plains.

“When you think of traditional secrecy and tax havens you most likely think of Switzerland, and the Caribbean,” begins the Reuters reporter in the accompanying video. She’s standing under the “Welcome to Wyoming” sign on I-80 outside of Cheyenne.

The Riverton Police Department will soon hire a staff member to investigate claims of race-based discrimination.

The person hired for the position will not be a police officer, but will work closely with police when conducting investigations, says Riverton police chief Mike Broadhead.

“I see this as a position to serve as an educator,” he says. “To help people who have been victims of bias to have an outlet that is healthy and to make them feel like they don’t have to go home frustrated. I want to give them a voice.”

Miles Bryan

Blake Dahlinger is a 33 year old musician. He lives in Los Angeles, but he grew up in Rawlins.

“It was obviously a small town,” he says. “But it was a really great place to grow up.”

The thing is, Dahlinger’s brand of frenetic punk rock didn’t get much play in Rawlins. So he did what a lot of Wyoming kids do: he finished school and moved away to a big city.

Northeast Wyoming is gearing up for an influx of people next week during the 75th anniversary of the Sturgis Motorcycle rally.

The event draws motorcycle enthusiasts from around the country. Hulett town clerk Melissa Bears says it means big business for towns in northeast Wyoming.

“For many of our businesses, what they make this week is what they will try and live on for the entire winter,” she says. “That’s what keeps them open so they can sustain their business for another year.”

Aaron Schrank

The rodeo may be the best-known competition at Cheyenne Frontier days, but outside the arena there is another group of skilled professionals vying for glory. Carnival games operators leverage years of practice and skill to convince people like you to pay cash for the opportunity to win a push, stuffed prize. For many of them, it's not just a job: it's a way of life. Wyoming Public Radio’s Miles Bryan spent time with a few of these games operators and has this postcard.

Sheridan may soon see air service return to its airport.

The northern Wyoming town has been without commercial air service since March, when Great Lakes Airlines pulled out of the area.

Great Lakes cited low business and a pilot shortage as reasons for leaving Sheridan.

The town of Jackson is weighing whether to extend legal protections against discrimination in employment and housing to LGBT people.

Jackson already has an LGBT anti-discrimination ordinance that covers public employees, but this policy change would extend that coverage to all Jackson residents. Mayor Sara Flitner says the proposal is modeled after the anti-discrimination measure Laramie recently passed.