Miles Bryan

Reporter

Phone: 307-766-5086
Email: pbryan@uwyo.edu

Miles previously worked at American Public Media’s Marketplace and National Public Radio’s Los Angeles bureau. His work has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and on public radio stations across the Northwest. Miles grew up in Minneapolis. He moonlights as a rock guitarist.

Ways to Connect

For a lot of us, the hospital's emergency room is a stressful place.

Not so for Glenn Baker.

When Baker, 44, steps into the emergency room at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago, he's completely comfortable.

He has a favorite double-wide chair in the corner, knows where to find the Cheetos in the vending machine, and the staff is like family.

M&R Glasgow, Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to the full show here.

Wyoming Lawmakers Oppose New Gun Measures In Wake Of Orlando

In the wake of the tragic slayings in Orlando last weekend, gun-control unexpectedly dominated Congress this week. Matt Laslo reports from Washington on why Wyoming lawmakers think the debate is misguided. 

Miles Bryan

Sandra Cuadrado spends most of her time studying dentistry at a university in Peru. But right now it is the 21-year-olds’ summer vacation, and Cuadrado has spent these last few months living and working the winter season  in Jackson on a J-1 Exchange Visitor student visa.  

“The idea of traveling here in the United States was to know more about this culture,” Cuadrado said. “And improve [my] English.”

The Wyoming Republican Party voted Saturday on who some of the state’s delegates will support in the GOP presidential convention in July.

Senator Ted Cruz dominated the contest winning 9 of the 12 delegates up for grabs. Marco Rubio and Donald Trump each got one delegate, and one delegate was elected as uncommitted. The rest of the state’s delegates will be decided at the GOP state convention in Casper in April.

Coal giant Peabody Energy announced plans to cut jobs at its Caballo and Rawhide mines near Gillette Thursday.

The company won't say how many people will lose their jobs. It released this statement: “In response to market conditions and customer needs, Peabody has implemented a small number of job reductions at its Caballo and Rawhide Mines. We regret the effect of these actions on employees and their families, and the company is taking steps to ease the transition through severance and outplacement support for those impacted.”

Miles Bryan

In a classroom at a Riverton activity center kids are sitting in a “connection circle.” They toss a ball around, and whoever has it has got to say what makes them happiest.

“I’m happiest when I am around my family,” one girl says before bouncing the ball to a boy. “I’m happiest when I’m riding my dirt bike,” he replies.

The idea is that if two kids are happy when they are doing the same thing, they make a connection. It wouldn’t feel out of place at an  alternative high school–it’s actually an alternative to juvenile detention.

Miles Bryan

On Wednesday, January 27, volunteers across Wyoming set out to find the state’s homeless. Many gave out lunch and hot drinks, and all carried surveys for the homeless that asked questions like “Do you drink alcohol?” and, “How often do you stay in an emergency shelter?”

Wyoming’s annual attempt to tally the state’s homeless population took place on Wednesday.

Known as the “Point-in-Time Count,” it's a 24-hour effort to count everyone who is homeless. The count is mandated by the federal department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which uses the data to track the country’s homeless population, and divvy up funds for homeless services. Last year, Wyoming counted 798 people as homeless.

Miles Bryan

Before you can buy a gun at Frontier Arms in Cheyenne, you have to fill out “Form 4473.” It asks questions like “Are you addicted to drugs?” and “Have you been convicted of a felony?” Owner Ryan Allen said, for most questions, there’s no use lying.

“In questions [where] we are talking about an actual crime, it's going to come up,” Allen said. “There are no if, ands, or buts about that.”

Miles Bryan

A few weeks after Cody officer Seth Horn went through Crisis Intervention Training, or “CIT,”  he went out on a call to see a man who was potentially suicidal.

“I started speaking with this person, and some things were lining up with the report that we got,” Horn said in a department conference room. “And then, using the training, I started to ask some very specific questions.”

Miles Bryan

Gillette mother Trish Simonson never wanted a tattoo. That changed when her son Kaden died by suicide last May. Now her left wrist is adorned with a Bible verse and a semicolon symbol, along with some text.

“It says Kaden: 5-8-15,” she said with her arm turned out. “And, ‘ask my story.’”

Trish’s twenty-five-year-old daughter Ashley has a fresh tattoo as well. She and her brother both loved Harry Potter, so a “Patronus”—a mythical creature from the books—is now inked on her right arm.

Miles Bryan

  

  

Bret Colvin says founded the “Stop Islam in Gillette” Facebook group for one reason.

 

“I don’t want Jihadis in my neighborhood.”

 

Colvin is a Catholic, and an ex-Marine. His wife passed away last year, and last month he lost his job as an oil field mechanic. Now he runs a home electronics repair business out of the small Gillette house he shares with a roommate, and a few pet turtles.

 

Bob Beck

Listen to the full show here.   

Wyo. Lawmakers Send Power Over Education To State

It took Congress eight years and countless hours of listening to angry teachers and parents, but No Child Left Behind is soon to be a thing of the past. Matt Laslo reports from Washington that Congress and the White House agreed to scrap the hated Bush-era law.

Miles Bryan

Head east from Cheyenne’s F.E. Warren Air Force Base for about thirty minutes and you will see a few wooden A-frame buildings sitting just off the highway. Go inside the big one and you’ll find a ladder. Climb down about a hundred feet, walk past the foot-thick metal blast door,  and you’re inside Quebec 1, a former launch control  center for one of the deadliest weapons ever made–a “Peacekeeper” intercontinental nuclear missile.

Miles Bryan

On a snowy, cold day in the Denver suburbs Glenn Vogel is tinkering in his laid back garage workspace.

“Welcome to the mess,” he said when he threw the door open.

Vogel’s a metal worker by trade. He lives part time in Glendo, Wyoming, but for years he’s run a custom metalworking business in Colorado. A few years back Vogel hit on a design for a new kind of high-end wine rack, he calls “Element.”

Miles Bryan

  

A Wyoming legislative committee recommended approval of a major reform to the state’s system for dealing with people involuntarily detained in a mental health crisis Monday night.

The system is known as “Title 25.” The bill approved by the committee  would give courts the ability to order people to undergo outpatient treatment; right now they can usually only order forced hospitalization, or let the patient go.

Miles Bryan

A group of UW student protestors called “BreakthrUWYO” staged a walkout of a discussion on diversity put on by the school and attended by UW president Dick McGinity Tuesday night.

 

Miles Bryan

26-year-old Cameron Largent lives with his mother in a big suburban house in Rock Springs. His favorite spot at home is the basement couch, where he’s set up to play the fantasy video game World of Warcraft.

“I’m a priest,” he says. “So my job is to run around and heal people. [my character] is the highest level you can get: level 100.”

Largent has had a lot of time to level up recently: he has been sober for six months. It’s the longest he has gone without drinking for years.

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

The National Park Service's draft plan for the Moose-Wilson corridor road in Grand Teton National Park is getting mixed reviews.

The 674-page  plan lays out four alternatives for the road, but endorses “Alternative C.” That plan would limit the number of cars allowed to be on the road, pave the road to provide for better bicycle access, and add a new ranger kiosk, among other things.

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Radio

Listen to the full show here.  

Wyoming's Revenue Picture Will Lead To A Lean Budget

The Consensus Revenue Estimating group or CREG will release its much-anticipated revenue forecast on Tuesday. Wyoming’s revenues are expected to drop 500 to 600 million dollars, which means legislators will have a lot less money to spend compared to the last budget. 

Miles Bryan

When 25-year-old graduate student Jordan Bishop moved into his apartment near the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie he bought a television, and signed up for broadband internet. But cable? No way.

“I always just knew it was going to be too expensive, so I didn’t even look at setting it up,” he says. “And I never cared about having hundreds of channels.”  

Instead, Bishop got an Apple TV. He watches his favorite shows with Netflix, and uses Apple’s streaming movie service to rent flicks.

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