Miles Bryan

Reporter

Phone: 307-766-5086
Email: pbryan@uwyo.edu

Miles previously worked at American Public Media’s Marketplace and National Public Radio’s Los Angeles bureau. His work has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and on public radio stations across the Northwest. Miles grew up in Minneapolis. He moonlights as a rock guitarist.

Ways to Connect

Miles Bryan

On Wednesday, January 27, volunteers across Wyoming set out to find the state’s homeless. Many gave out lunch and hot drinks, and all carried surveys for the homeless that asked questions like “Do you drink alcohol?” and, “How often do you stay in an emergency shelter?”

Wyoming’s annual attempt to tally the state’s homeless population took place on Wednesday.

Known as the “Point-in-Time Count,” it's a 24-hour effort to count everyone who is homeless. The count is mandated by the federal department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which uses the data to track the country’s homeless population, and divvy up funds for homeless services. Last year, Wyoming counted 798 people as homeless.

Miles Bryan

Before you can buy a gun at Frontier Arms in Cheyenne, you have to fill out “Form 4473.” It asks questions like “Are you addicted to drugs?” and “Have you been convicted of a felony?” Owner Ryan Allen said, for most questions, there’s no use lying.

“In questions [where] we are talking about an actual crime, it's going to come up,” Allen said. “There are no if, ands, or buts about that.”

Miles Bryan

A few weeks after Cody officer Seth Horn went through Crisis Intervention Training, or “CIT,”  he went out on a call to see a man who was potentially suicidal.

“I started speaking with this person, and some things were lining up with the report that we got,” Horn said in a department conference room. “And then, using the training, I started to ask some very specific questions.”

Miles Bryan

Gillette mother Trish Simonson never wanted a tattoo. That changed when her son Kaden died by suicide last May. Now her left wrist is adorned with a Bible verse and a semicolon symbol, along with some text.

“It says Kaden: 5-8-15,” she said with her arm turned out. “And, ‘ask my story.’”

Trish’s twenty-five-year-old daughter Ashley has a fresh tattoo as well. She and her brother both loved Harry Potter, so a “Patronus”—a mythical creature from the books—is now inked on her right arm.

Miles Bryan

  

  

Bret Colvin says founded the “Stop Islam in Gillette” Facebook group for one reason.

 

“I don’t want Jihadis in my neighborhood.”

 

Colvin is a Catholic, and an ex-Marine. His wife passed away last year, and last month he lost his job as an oil field mechanic. Now he runs a home electronics repair business out of the small Gillette house he shares with a roommate, and a few pet turtles.

 

Bob Beck

Listen to the full show here.   

Wyo. Lawmakers Send Power Over Education To State

It took Congress eight years and countless hours of listening to angry teachers and parents, but No Child Left Behind is soon to be a thing of the past. Matt Laslo reports from Washington that Congress and the White House agreed to scrap the hated Bush-era law.

Miles Bryan

Head east from Cheyenne’s F.E. Warren Air Force Base for about thirty minutes and you will see a few wooden A-frame buildings sitting just off the highway. Go inside the big one and you’ll find a ladder. Climb down about a hundred feet, walk past the foot-thick metal blast door,  and you’re inside Quebec 1, a former launch control  center for one of the deadliest weapons ever made–a “Peacekeeper” intercontinental nuclear missile.

Miles Bryan

On a snowy, cold day in the Denver suburbs Glenn Vogel is tinkering in his laid back garage workspace.

“Welcome to the mess,” he said when he threw the door open.

Vogel’s a metal worker by trade. He lives part time in Glendo, Wyoming, but for years he’s run a custom metalworking business in Colorado. A few years back Vogel hit on a design for a new kind of high-end wine rack, he calls “Element.”

Miles Bryan

  

A Wyoming legislative committee recommended approval of a major reform to the state’s system for dealing with people involuntarily detained in a mental health crisis Monday night.

The system is known as “Title 25.” The bill approved by the committee  would give courts the ability to order people to undergo outpatient treatment; right now they can usually only order forced hospitalization, or let the patient go.

Miles Bryan

A group of UW student protestors called “BreakthrUWYO” staged a walkout of a discussion on diversity put on by the school and attended by UW president Dick McGinity Tuesday night.

 

Miles Bryan

26-year-old Cameron Largent lives with his mother in a big suburban house in Rock Springs. His favorite spot at home is the basement couch, where he’s set up to play the fantasy video game World of Warcraft.

“I’m a priest,” he says. “So my job is to run around and heal people. [my character] is the highest level you can get: level 100.”

Largent has had a lot of time to level up recently: he has been sober for six months. It’s the longest he has gone without drinking for years.

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

The National Park Service's draft plan for the Moose-Wilson corridor road in Grand Teton National Park is getting mixed reviews.

The 674-page  plan lays out four alternatives for the road, but endorses “Alternative C.” That plan would limit the number of cars allowed to be on the road, pave the road to provide for better bicycle access, and add a new ranger kiosk, among other things.

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Radio

Listen to the full show here.  

Wyoming's Revenue Picture Will Lead To A Lean Budget

The Consensus Revenue Estimating group or CREG will release its much-anticipated revenue forecast on Tuesday. Wyoming’s revenues are expected to drop 500 to 600 million dollars, which means legislators will have a lot less money to spend compared to the last budget. 

Miles Bryan

When 25-year-old graduate student Jordan Bishop moved into his apartment near the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie he bought a television, and signed up for broadband internet. But cable? No way.

“I always just knew it was going to be too expensive, so I didn’t even look at setting it up,” he says. “And I never cared about having hundreds of channels.”  

Instead, Bishop got an Apple TV. He watches his favorite shows with Netflix, and uses Apple’s streaming movie service to rent flicks.

Miles Bryan

Historical horse racing machines will remain shut down in Wyoming for at least weeks, and more likely a few months.

Since the machines were legalized in Wyoming in 2013, they’ve brought in tens of millions in revenue for the horse racing industry—and generated millions in taxes for the state. Historical horse racing machines currently exist at more than a dozen locations throughout the state.

Wyoming Secretary of State Ed Murray says he wants the state’s next Elections Director to focus on improving voter registration and turnout.

This comes after the state’s longtime Elections Director, Peggie Nighswonger, resigned from the post last month, citing philosophical differences with Murray. Nighswonger said in an interview with WPR that Secretary Murray is focusing too much on voter registration programs, and not spending enough time preparing for the 2016 elections.

Longtime Wyoming chief election official Peggy Nighswonger has resigned, citing what she calls philosophical differences with Secretary of State Ed Murray.

Nighswonger, who has overseen elections in the state for almost twenty years as the state Elections Director, says she had been planning to stay on through the 2016 elections so she could mentor a replacement. But she says she was unable to do that while working under Murray.

Historical horse racing machines will remain shut down in Wyoming for at least weeks, and more likely a few months.

 

Miles Bryan

Many of us begin our day by watching the garage door open.

It’s creaking sound usually doesn’t mean anything special: time for another morning commute, or maybe some yard work if it’s the weekend. But for Jack Schulte, the sound of the garage door opening inspires brings up far less mundane feelings.

“It makes me ready,” he says. “To break the surly bonds of gravity.”

Miles Bryan

People in Pinedale have a lot to say about their mayor, Bob Jones—and not much of it is nice.

Longtime councilman Tim Lingle says his day-to-day has become much more hostile since the new mayor took over.

“Do I hate him? I think that’s a bit strong,” Lingle says. “Do I wish we kept our old Mayor? Absolutely.”

Mayor Jones has also made enemies with some of the small town’s business leaders—like Tamra Watts, who runs Pinedale’s popular Wind River Brewery and restaurant.

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