All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM
Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Composer ID: 
5187f61ee1c8c26fe80558c7|5187f617e1c8c26fe80558ab

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Technology
1:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

A Look At Mobile Technology Used In Retail

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Here's another challenge for traditional retailers. Companies like Amazon and eBay now offer apps for your Smartphone that take a lot of the legwork out of comparison-shopping. While you're in a store, just take a picture of an item or scan the barcode on the box. You'll find out where else to get it and you might even get an extra discount for buying it on the spot.

Stephen Hoch teaches marketing at the Wharton School of Business and consults for some retailers.

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From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Letters: Stilts; 'People's Mic'; Backseat Book Club

Robert Siegel and Lynn Neary read emails from listeners.

Europe
1:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Britain Skeptical About Euro

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 4:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More insular than ever - so says the French newspaper Le Mon, and it was referring to Britain and that country's decision not to join the effort to forge a new European pact. Today, nearly every European leader expressed support for that pact, but not the British prime minister, David Cameron. NPR's Philip Reeves explains.

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National Security
1:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Questions Surround FBI Agent's Disappearance

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 4:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in Iran, is appealing for his return.

DAVID LEVINSON: My name is David Levinson, and I'm speaking on behalf of my mother, Christine Levinson, and my entire family. Please tell us your demands so we can work together to bring my father home safely.

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National Security
1:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Brennan Discusses Defense Authorization Bill

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 4:12 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 runs hundreds of pages. It authorizes hundreds of billions in defense spending. And as it stands, the version of the bill approved by the Senate is facing a veto by President Obama.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Thu December 8, 2011

Apple, Publishing Houses Face Antitrust Probe

Originally published on Thu December 8, 2011 8:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

The European Union may be in the middle of its biggest crisis ever, but that doesn't mean it's overlooking the small stuff - international competition over the sale of eBooks, for example. The E.U.'s executive body, the European Commission, is investigating Apple and five major publishers for possible antitrust violations relating to the pricing of eBooks. The U.S. Justice Department is also investigating the publishers and Apple, for possible anti-competitive practices.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Thu December 8, 2011

Shootings Reported At Virginia Tech

Lynn Neary speaks with Lerone Graham, reporter for the Roanoke Times, for the latest about reported shootings on the campus of Virginia Tech.

Music News
2:13 pm
Thu December 8, 2011

A Giant Theremin Is Watching You Down Under

The Giant Theremin emits not only tones but also some prerecorded musical sounds.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu December 8, 2011 8:08 pm

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu December 8, 2011

EPA Connects 'Franking' With Water Contamination

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has for the first time implicated a connection between "fracking" and contamination of ground water. The controversial method of natural gas and oil extraction consists of injecting high-pressure water and chemicals into the ground in order to more easily access the oil and gas. Robert Siegel speaks with NPR's Elizabeth Shogren about the report.

Author Interviews
2:01 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

A New Look At The Man Behind U.S. Cold War Policy

Originally published on Wed December 7, 2011 3:55 pm

For much of the Cold War, George F. Kennan was America's best-known diplomat and a leading Soviet scholar. His reputation was based in large part on the 1947 essay he wrote on containment, the Cold War policy that said the U.S. should neither forcefully confront nor meekly appease the Soviets.

Rather, the U.S. should seek to contain Soviet expansion, power and influence in the belief that the communist system would eventually collapse on its own. The U.S. largely adhered to Kennan's road map until the Soviet Union crumbled in 1991.

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Law
1:00 pm
Wed December 7, 2011

Blagojevich Sentenced To 14 Years In Prison

Originally published on Wed December 7, 2011 3:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Fourteen years in federal prison, that's the sentence given today to former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, who was convicted of 18 corruption charges. A federal judge in Chicago handed down the sentence after Blagojevich himself addressed the court and pleaded for mercy.

NPR's David Schaper was there.

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Opinion
1:55 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

The Magic Of Music And A Little Room To Groove

istockphoto.com

Alan Heathcock is the author of the collection Volt.

Last week, my wife suggested we have a dance floor installed in our family room. She was smiling ear-to-ear, wiping sweat from her eyes. Behind her, our three kids took turns showing off their moves as Michael Jackson's P.Y.T. blared over the speakers.

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Music
1:36 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

The Roots: A Song Cycle For A Life Cycle

The Roots' 10th studio album, undun, is a concept record chronicling the downfall of its narrator.
Courtesy of the artist

The hip-hop band The Roots might currently be the hardest-working band in show business. Five nights a week, it's the house band on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, and is constantly collaborating with other artists. And this week, the band issued its 10th studio album.

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Monkey See
1:27 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

DVD Picks: 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy'

Acorn Media

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 5:36 pm

Time now for a home-viewing recommendation from our film critic, Bob Mondello. With a new movie version of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy opening this week, Bob's suggesting the TV original.

At some point in my youth, I must have known the nursery rhyme "Tinker, tailor/ soldier, sailor/ rich man, poor man/beggar man, thief," but since 1979, the instant someone says "Tinker Tailor," the next two words that occur to me are "Alec Guinness."

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The Record
12:00 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

Remembering Larry Levan, 'The Jimi Hendrix of Dance Music'

Larry Levan, who made the highlight of a new collection of DJ mixes recorded at London superclub Ministry of Sound. Levan's work at New York club Paradise Garage was the inspiration for the London club.
Unknown.

The audio link above is a radio story for All Things Considered about the late Larry Levan, the producer and DJ whose residency at New York's Paradise Garage between 1977 and 1987 remains the most storied in clubland.

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World
3:06 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Russia Threatens To Reevaluate Nuclear Arms Treaty

In the past two weeks, Russia's president has once again slammed the U.S. for its missile defense plans in Europe. President Dmitry Medvedev told his nation Russia would aim its missiles at U.S. missile interceptors when they are deployed in Europe. He also said Russia might even pull out of the new START agreement, which limits both sides' strategic nuclear warhead deployments. We've heard these complaints and threats before from Moscow. Nevertheless, the tone of the Medvedev's remarks was quite sharp.

The Record
2:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Howard Tate, Soul Singer, Dies At 72

Howard Tate, circa 1970.
Michael Ochs Courtesy of the artist.

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 5:22 pm

Soul music lost one of its great voices last week. Singer Howard Tate died Friday after a battle with cancer at the age of 72. Tate had made his name with a string of classic records including "Get It While You Can," before sliding into obscurity and addiction. But Tate got sober, found religion and he enjoyed a successful encore career over the past decade.

Tate's first turn at the music business came in 1966, when the single "Ain't Nobody Home" hit the R&B charts.

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Economy
1:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Dems Form New Plan To Fund Payroll Tax Cut

Having tried and failed to come up with a way to pay for an extension of the payroll tax cut with a tax on millionaires, Senate Democrats came back with a new idea Monday: pay for it with the anticipated savings from ending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Asia
1:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

In Russia, Protesters Take To The Streets

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 5:22 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Thousands of protestors took to the streets tonight in Moscow. They accused the party of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin of stealing votes in Russia's parliamentary elections. The party United Russia won 50 percent of the vote. That's significantly less than it has in the past and less than the party was expected to win this time around. Still, independent monitors and the protestors say the vote was rigged.

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Three Books...
5:00 am
Mon December 5, 2011

3 Problem-Solving Reads For The Scientific Sleuth

iStockphoto.com

As a boy in a tiny village in Mexico, I loved climbing up to the roof of my family's small home so I could study the stars and dream of becoming an astronaut. Then I discovered Kaliman, a comic-book hero who could unravel any mystery with his powers of telepathy, philosophy and scientific ability. He was fond of saying, "He who masters the mind, masters everything."

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Music Interviews
12:32 pm
Sun December 4, 2011

Mayer Hawthorne: A Motor City Kid Looks To The Future

Mayer Hawthorne's latest album is called How Do You Do.
Courtesy of the artist

At 32, neo-soul singer and multi-instrumentalist Mayer Hawthorne isn't quite old enough to remember the classic days of Motown, but the Michigan native says he did absorb some of the music's aesthetic growing up, thanks to his father.

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Author Interviews
12:13 pm
Sun December 4, 2011

Pauline Kael's Legacy Built By Straying From Herd

Pauline Kael was a film critic for The New Yorker from 1967 to 1991, as well as the author of several books, including I Lost It at the Movies and For Keeps: 30 Years at the Movies.
AP

Pauline Kael, long-time New Yorker film critic, was famous for her scathing, but honest movie reviews. She took digs at many popular films like The Sound of Music and Star Wars with no inhibitions. Yet her enthusiasm for films like Bonnie and Clyde gave some movies a new lease on life.

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The Record
10:34 am
Sun December 4, 2011

From Knee-To-Knee To CD: The Evolution Of Oral Tradition In Mountain Ballads

Left to right: Melanie Rice, her son Ezra Penland and grandmother Sheila Kay Adams.
Laurin Penland

Originally published on Wed December 7, 2011 8:04 pm

My 5-year-old nephew, Ezra, sits between his mother and grandmother on a porch-swing covered in old quilts. An expansive view of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Madison County, N.C., spreads out before them.

The porch used to be a really important part of mountain music. Ezra's mother, Melanie, sings one of the old ballads, just like her ancestors used to do 200 years ago.

The hope is that if Ezra hears the ballads, he'll start to learn them, just as he's learned the names of the trees on his farm, says his grandmother Sheila Kay Adams.

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Movie Interviews
2:58 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

Freud, Jung And What Went Wrong

A woman of some importance: Sabine Spielrein, one of Karl Jung's celebrated patients, later became a psychiatrist herself — and, as screenwriter Christopher Hampton tells NPR's Rachel Martin, an influence on both Jung and Sigmund Freud. Keira Knightley plays Spielrein in the new film A Dangerous Method.
Sony Pictures Classics

Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud are known as the fathers of psychoanalysis, but they focused on different things. Freud on the sexual underpinnings of — well, almost everything — and Jung for his mystical bent and dream theories.

For years, the two were close friends and collaborators but they had a falling out that ultimately ended their relationship. And turns out, there was a woman involved. Her name was Sabina Spielren.

The stories of all three are woven together in a new film called <em>A Dangerous Method.</em>

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Author Interviews
2:40 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

The Doors Prove Strange Days Are Still With Us

The Doors, photographed in 1966.
Joel Brodsky Elektra Records

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 4:27 pm

To this day, Jim Morrison is one of the most significant frontmen to grace the rock stage. His band, The Doors, was unpredictable, mysterious, thrilling — even frightening.

In his new book,The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years, music writer Greil Marcus explores how the rock group came to define an era yet remain relevant today.

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Pop Culture
1:47 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

Chuck Berry's Cadillac A-Rollin' To The Smithsonian

Chuck Berry's 1973 Eldorado now belongs to the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. The museum, now under construction, is set to open its doors in 2015.
Bill Griffiths Smithsonian

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 4:27 pm

When rock 'n' roll legend Chuck Berry navigated his music career, he didn't rely on agents or record labels; he drove himself to his own business meetings and concerts in his fleet of Cadillacs.

Now Berry has donated one of those cars, a candy-apple red 1973 Eldorado, to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, set to open its doors in 2015. NPR's Rachel Martin went with curator Kevin Strait to watch Smithsonian fleet manager Bill Griffiths restore the car in Suitland, Md.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:08 pm
Fri December 2, 2011

Siri's Anti-Abortion Tendencies A Result Of Technology, Not Apple Conspiracy

Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're out to get you.

That could be the motto this week for abortion rights groups that immediately sprang into battle mode when it was discovered that Siri, Apple's new artificially intelligent personal assistant, wasn't so, well, intelligent when it came to abortion.

It turns out, however, that it was all much ado about not so much.

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Music Interviews
2:59 pm
Fri December 2, 2011

For The Queen Of Hip-Hop Soul, A Sequel About Strength

Mary J. Blige's new album is My Life II.
Markus Klinko and Indrani

Originally published on Sun January 22, 2012 8:07 am

Seventeen years ago, Mary J. Blige shook up the world of R&B when she released the record My Life. It ushered in a new sound: soul music over hip-hop beats. Instantly, Blige became known as the queen of hip-hop soul.

My Life was about pain — about Blige's rough childhood, abusive relationship and battles with addiction and depression. Seventeen years on, she's revisited that album. Her new record is called My Life II ... The Journey Continues. She says it's about strength.

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Opinion
1:41 pm
Fri December 2, 2011

The Marvels And Messes Of A Month Of Writing

istockphoto.com

Erin Morgenstern is the author of The Night Circus.

Yesterday I was told I had approximately 20 hours to write an essay: 450 words about National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo. I'm quite partial to the event. Still, I thought about declining the essay, given the time constraint.

But then I decided, in the spirit of NaNoWriMo, that it was rather silly to say "oh, I can't write 450 words in less than a day" So here we go:

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Monkey See
1:15 pm
Fri December 2, 2011

Bow Bow, Chk-a-Bow: Five Voices Rise To The Top Of TV's A Cappella Competition

Pentatonix performs on The Sing-Off.
Lewis Jacobs NBC

Originally published on Fri December 2, 2011 5:00 pm

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