Author Interviews

Clay Landry

The era of the mountain man was brief—the high point of the Rocky Mountain beaver fur trade was between 1820 and 1840. But the period still holds fascination today. Clay Landry has written extensively on the subject.

He’ll be speaking on non-fiction writing at the Wyoming Writers Conference June 2-4 in Gillette. As Landry told Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, he recently served as a historical advisor for the 2016 film The Revenant.

Timothy Egan

National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Timothy Egan’s newest book The Immortal Irishman, tells the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher and how he changed the course of history in Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Egan will be coming to the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie Tuesday, April 18 to give a talk on his book. He spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard, and said he first discovered Meagher’s story on a visit to Montana.

Richard Cahan

A new book compiles government photos of Japanese-Americans in World War II incarceration camps, including Heart Mountain in Wyoming. For the first time, some of the people in the photos have been interviewed. 

Those interviews are included in Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II. Author Richard Cahan joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Erin Jones to talk about the stories of the photos.

Brad Watson

UW creative writing professor Brad Watson is out with a new novel that’s been long-listed for this year’s National Book Award.

As he tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Erin Jones, Miss Jane is about a woman living in rural Mississippi in the early 1900s, with a rare congenital disorder that renders her incontinent and unable to reproduce.

Neltje

The celebrated Wyoming artist Neltje has led a storied life. Her new memoir, North of Crazy, chronicles her journey from high society to the high plains.

As the daughter of famed publisher Nelson Doubleday, Neltje had a privileged upbringing, growing up in her family’s homes in New York, Long Island, and South Carolina.

But as an adult, she left society life and moved to her adopted home near Sheridan, where she still lives. Neltje spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Robert Kelly

As America contemplates its future with a new president, one man has been looking to the past for cues about our future. Robert Kelly, an archaeologist at the University of Wyoming, has written a new book called The Fifth Beginning.

In it, he argues humanity has encountered four transition points - or “beginnings” - in its history: the invention of technology, like stone tools, culture, agriculture, and the state. He sat down with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to discuss the period of transition humans are facing right now.

Edward S. Curtis

  

It’s been a long time since a large market book has tackled the history of the Indian Wars in the American West. But just last month, a new one hit bookstores, titled The Earth Is Weeping.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards chatted with author Peter Cozzens about why he felt it was time to get people thinking about this tragic era in American history.

Julianne Couch

According to demographers, small town America is in trouble. Populations are aging and shrinking, as young people leave for the big city. But that’s not the whole picture. In her new book, Julianne Couch draws on her own experience to paint a portrait of nine small towns in Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Wyoming—specifically Centennial.

Baylen J. Linnekin

In 2015, Wyoming passed the Food Freedom Act, giving the state’s farmers and ranchers the most flexible food rules in the nation...making it possible for them sell things direct to consumers that are illegal elsewhere, like unpasteurized milk, poultry, jams, and other foods. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards talked with the author of the new book Biting the Hands That Feed Us: How Fewer, Smarter Laws Would Make Our Food System More Sustainable, about Wyoming’s Food Freedom Act, and just how common this level of deregulation is in other states.

Michael Polito Source: Wikimedia Commons

  

The community of Gillette has seen tension recently with plans for a Quran burning and protests over Gillette’s first mosque. Writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Kathryn Schulz heard this and wondered how a Muslim community came to be in coal mining Wyoming.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Thanks to innovations in camera technology, wildlife biologists are now able to peek into the lives of animals like never before. Now, a new book called Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, compiles the best camera trap photos from around the world. Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards talked with author, Roland Hayes, head of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and Professor at North Carolina State University. Hayes starts the conversation by explaining just what a camera trap is.

Donning

 

In 1914 John Woody started a Wyoming phone company that is now known as Union Wireless. These days it’s a multi-million dollar corporation and one of the state’s great success stories.

Author Terry Del Bene has written a book about the company called A Phone Where The Buffalo Roamed. He explains why this phone company survived for over 100 years while others have faltered. 

Photo courtesy Jennie Lawrence

In stories of the American Revolution, the Civil War, and westward expansion, the lives and roles of women often go untold.

Laramie Author Jennie Lawrence is aiming to change that a bit, with her new book Soap Suds Row: The Bold Lives of Army Laundresses 1802 – 1876. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard sat down for a conversation with the author about the secret lives of laundresses.

Award Winning Poet Discusses Her New Book

Jun 10, 2016
sastrugipress.com

Laramie Poet Lori Howe has a new book coming out called Voices at Twilight. It’s a book of poems, photographs, and historic essays about the ghost towns of Wyoming’s southern corridor. She joins Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck and reads excerpts from that book. 

Lori Howe will be on tour this month as a Think Wyoming, Wyoming Humanities Council roads scholar teaching free creative writing workshops on the subject of Water in Wyoming. 

Courtesy of Wyoming State Archives, Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources

Ernest Hemingway is almost as famous for places he lived and visited—like Paris and Spain—as he is for his writing. Now, an article in Big Sky Magazine reveals Hemingway’s Wyoming connections. The article’s author, Darla Worden, became a Hemingway fan while attending high school in Sheridan. As she told Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, the Sheridan area has its own Hemingway connection.

J.J. Anselmi

  

A new memoir tells the story of youthful rebellion in Rock Springs. Writer J.J. Anselmi recalls growing up in the hardscrabble mining town on a steady diet of drugs, vandalism, heavy metal, and tattoos. But this story of teenage angst also explores Rock Springs’ history.

As a teenager, J.J. Anselmi covered his body with tattoos of his favorite bands: Metallica, Pantera, Black Sabbath. They represented the anger he felt growing up. But a few years later, Anselmi began having his tattoos surgically cut from his skin.

Taylor Brorby and Ice Cube Press

Fracking: the technique for boosting oil and gas production has been around for decades, but chances are you didn’t hear about it until recently. In just a few short years, the fracking boom has transformed communities across the country… and elicited plenty of emotions from all sides. Fracture is a new book of essays, poems and short fiction on the topic of fracking.

Erik Larson

So-called Historical Mystery Writer Erik Larson is coming to the University of Wyoming this month. UW libraries will host Larson April 20th at 1:30 p.m. in the College of Education auditorium and that evening, UW libraries will host a dinner with Larson.

Victor Ashear

As we continue our series looking at serious mental health issues we turn our attention to a workbook intended to help those with these serious issues change their outlook.

Doctor Victor Ashear was a long time clinical psychologist at the Sheridan VA and a current private practitioner in Sheridan who deals with those who have serious mental illness. He is joined by his editor and former suicide prevention specialist Vanessa Hastings. Dr. Ashear’s book is called Self-Acceptance: The Key to Recovery from Mental Illness.  

Craig Johnson is the author of eight novels in the Walt Longmire mystery series, which has garnered popular and critical acclaim. Johnson, whose main character is Sheriff Walt Longmire, said he does base his characters on family, neighbors and his friends on the Cheyenne reservation.

South Dakota Historical Society Press

  

One of the most controversial figures in the history of the American West is Ogalala chief Red Cloud. To some a brilliant warrior and politician, to others, to blame for the Ogalala’s loss of the Black Hills. Now, there’s a new biography called Red Cloud: Ogalala Legend.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards talked with research historian John McDermott about how the Ogalala ended up in Wyoming, and why giving up these lands meant the end of their way of life.

Wikimedia Commons

In recent years, the meat packing industry has been adopting more humane treatment of livestock. And that’s thanks-- in no small part-- to one woman: Temple Grandin. In her many book, she talks about applying her own experiences as a person with autism to how animals view the world. The U.S. Department of Agriculture even uses a checklist developed by Grandin to enforce better treatment.

sastrugipress.com

  

Laramie author and poet Lori Howe’s new book CloudShade: Poems of the High Plains, is due out on November 18. Poems from CloudShade have been nominated for a Pushcart award, and the collection itself nominated for several first-book awards. She begins our conversation by reading one of her poems called On the Ice. 

CloudShade is available on the Sastrugi Press website or via her website.

University of Wyoming

Lucy Lippard writes about the role of art in society. She’s at the University of Wyoming as an Eminent Artist in Residence, and she stopped by our studios to talk with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

In her book The Lure of the Local, Lucy Lippard says everybody should take responsibility for wherever they find themselves for as long as they live there. And she says that starts with simply looking around.

philipwarburg.com

  

In recent years, solar energy has gone from the fringe to mainstream. Solar costs have dropped dramatically while solar installations have similarly increased. Solar still provides less than 1 percent of the nation’s power, and in states like Wyoming, it’s virtually nonexistent. But many predict solar power will play a much larger role in the future.

Melodie Edwards

For women, it’s never been easy breaking into male-dominated fields. That was the case for Susan Marsh. She’s the author of a new book called A Hunger For High Country. It’s a memoir about how her childhood love for nature led her to become a landscape architect for the U.S. Forest Service. Marsh is now retired and writing a natural history of Jackson’s Cache Creek. On a wildflower walk along the creek with Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards, she talked about her years of struggle during a time when the Forest Service hired very few women.

Andrew Cowell

 

 

The Arapaho language is one of many indigenous languages considered endangered. But a new book of bilingual Arapaho stories attempts to help the problem by collecting hundreds of songs and prayers into one place.

A new translation is making old Viking poems accessible to general readers. The stories of gods and heroes were written down in 13th century Iceland. But for translator Jackson Crawford—who lives in Riverton—the existing English translations of the Poetic Edda were just hard to read.  

Wikipedia Commons

Like the enormous herds wild of bison that once thundered across the west, in coming years the forests of Yellowstone may, too, become few and far between.

That’s according to the new study The Coming Climate: Ecological Impacts of Climate Change On Teton County, commissioned by the Chartour Institute. Corinna Riginos is a research ecologist and co- authored the report. She tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard the data itself isn’t new – but they’re using it to make predictions about what could happen to the ecosystem and economy in Northwestern Wyoming.

Jeff Henry

In 1988 much of Yellowstone National Park was engulfed in flames. At the time a young employee and budding photographer named Jeff Henry was asked to take photos of the fire.

Over 25 years later Henry has written a book about the fires that includes numerous photographs that he took on the front lines. The book is called The Year Yellowstone Burned: A 25 Year Perspective. Henry joins us and recalls how politicians and others were critical of the Parks approach to the fires. 

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