Features

Neltje

The celebrated Wyoming artist Neltje has led a storied life. Her new memoir, North of Crazy, chronicles her journey from high society to the high plains.

As the daughter of famed publisher Nelson Doubleday, Neltje had a privileged upbringing, growing up in her family’s homes in New York, Long Island, and South Carolina.

But as an adult, she left society life and moved to her adopted home near Sheridan, where she still lives. Neltje spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Americana Duo Sally & George On Wyoming Sounds

Dec 1, 2016
Grady Kirkpatrick

Sally & George on 11/23/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

Studio Session With Baroque Folk Band River Whyless

Nov 28, 2016
Anna Rader

River Whyless studio session, showcasing songs from their new album We All The Light. (recorded August 2016)

A new anthology of Wyoming writers offers a current snapshot of the state’s literary tradition. The book’s release is being celebrated with readings and book signings in six communities around the state.

‘Blood, Water, Wind, and Stone’ features the work of more than 70 poets, fiction, and non-fiction writers. Editor Lori Howe says the title reflects the overall theme that runs through the anthology.

leonrussellrecords.com

  

Musician, writer and producer Leon Russell passed away November 13 at the age of 74. Russell’s wife, Jan Bridges, said in a statement that her husband died in his sleep at their Nashville home. Russell had heart bypass surgery in July and had been planning on resuming touring in January.

Leon Russell talked with Grady Kirkpatrick ahead of his show in Laramie Aug 6, 2013.

 

Robert Kelly

As America contemplates its future with a new president, one man has been looking to the past for cues about our future. Robert Kelly, an archaeologist at the University of Wyoming, has written a new book called The Fifth Beginning.

In it, he argues humanity has encountered four transition points - or “beginnings” - in its history: the invention of technology, like stone tools, culture, agriculture, and the state. He sat down with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to discuss the period of transition humans are facing right now.

Edward S. Curtis

  

It’s been a long time since a large market book has tackled the history of the Indian Wars in the American West. But just last month, a new one hit bookstores, titled The Earth Is Weeping.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards chatted with author Peter Cozzens about why he felt it was time to get people thinking about this tragic era in American history.

Tom McKean With Round The Bend On Morning Music

Nov 4, 2016
Anna Rader

Round The Bend Quartet on 11/02/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

Florida Americana Folk Musician Austin Miller On Morning Music

Nov 1, 2016
Austin Miller

Austin Miller live on 11/01/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

BRANDON BALLENGEE, UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING ART MUSEUM

On November 1, the University of Wyoming Art Museum will host Evening Conversations with Curators.

The event is part of the on-going Earth, Wind and Water program, and will spotlight the museum’s November exhibit Waste Land: A Survey of Works by Brandon Ballengée, 1996-2016. Master Teacher Heather Bender will be one of the hosts for the event, and said she looks forward to discussing such an interested mixed media exhibit.

Edward S. Curtis

A new history of the Indian Wars of the late 19th century hit bookstores on Tuesday. The author set out to debunk myths about the settling of the American West. Historian and author of The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West, Peter Cozzens, said he wrote the book because he saw the need for an objective account of the Indian Wars.

Julianne Couch

According to demographers, small town America is in trouble. Populations are aging and shrinking, as young people leave for the big city. But that’s not the whole picture. In her new book, Julianne Couch draws on her own experience to paint a portrait of nine small towns in Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Wyoming—specifically Centennial.

University of Wyoming Art Museum Facebook Page

Five paintings and 20 prints by renowned abstract expressionist Harold Garde are now part of the University of Wyoming Art Museum’s permanent collection.

Garde studied at the University of Wyoming during the 1940s under the G.I. Bill, where he learned from professors like George McNeil, Leon Kelly, and Ilya Bolotowsky. UW Art Museum Director Susan Moldenhauer said Garde is now in his 90s but is still painting.

arts.gov

  

The Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Jane Chu, was recently in Laramie. The visit was one of hundreds of trips Chu has made to communities around the country to see first-hand the role the arts are playing. Chairman Chu stopped by our studios to talk with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming Symphony Orchestra begins its new season under the direction of a guest conductor. As part of a so-called ‘podium exchange,’ UW Symphony director Michael Griffith conducted an American piece in Brazil.

On Thursday, Brazilian conductor Carlos Henrique Costa will conduct two works from his home country in Laramie. One piece, Museu da Inconfidência, by César Guerra-Peixe, draws on folkloric styles. The other piece, Psalmus, by living composer João Guilherme Ripper, reflects the modern urban experience.

A Prairie Home Companion / American Public Media

After more than 40 years of hosting ‘A Prairie Home Companion,’ Garrison Keillor is handing the show over to his hand-picked successor, mandolinist Chris Thile, who debuts as the show’s new host this weekend.

Jesse Michener

Ira Glass, the host of This American Life, will give a talk in Laramie this weekend. This American Life and its spinoff Serial have been game changers in public radio for their narrative approach to storytelling and their digital distribution.

Dallas Singer-Songwriter Vanessa Peters On Morning Music

Oct 10, 2016
Vanessa Peters

Vanessa Peters recorded live on 10/10/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

arts.gov

Representatives from the National Endowment for the Arts are in Laramie for a public event this evening. Chairman Jane Chu and Wyoming Arts Council Executive Director Michael Lange will host a town hall reception at the Gryphon Theatre at 6 p.m in honor of the NEA's 50th anniversary and Chu's first visit to Wyoming.

centralcityopera.org

One of the country’s oldest opera companies is bringing a rags-to-riches-to-rags story to Cheyenne on Thursday evening. The Ballad of Baby Doe tells the scandalous true story of Horace Tabor, who strikes it rich prospecting for silver and leaves his wife Augusta for a woman named Baby Doe. But when silver goes bust, the pair ends up penniless and alone.

matthewsavery.com

This year marks the 67th season for the Casper-based Wyoming Symphony Orchestra. They’re calling it ‘A Moving Symphonic Season’ because the orchestra has a final concert at Casper College this weekend before returning to a newly renovated auditorium in December. 

When Women Run, Women Win...Except When They Don't

Sep 23, 2016
Jennifer Pemberton

There are currently 10 women serving in the Utah House of Representatives and 6 in the state senate. Together they make up 15% of the 104 elected state legislators. This puts Utah in the bottom 10 states for percentage of women represented in the state legislature.

There are a lot of reasons for the disparity between men and women serving as elected state officials, but according to Katie Ziegler with the National Convention of State Legislatures, none of them has to do with electability:

Ann Marsden

 

After public universities opened their doors to women, the chance to study music composition opened up as well. But the best known, highest paid composers still tend to be men. Composer Libby Larsen is one notable exception - she is the eminent musician-in-residence at the University of Wyoming for the 2016 – 2017 academic year.

She joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about her distinctly American-sounding music and some of the biggest challenges still facing female composers.

Brian Scott Gamroth's facebook

Longtime Casper radio morning announcer, Brian Scott Gamroth, known as Brian Scott on the air, died in a motorcycle accident in Montana on Sunday. Gamroth was known for his support of a number of causes including the arts.

Gamroth served on the boards for the Casper College Theatre Program, the Nicolaysen Art Museum, and the Wyoming Symphony Orchestra.

Anna Rader

Michael Martin Murphey recorded live on 9/20/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

Rebecca Huntington

In Grand Teton National Park, the White Grass Dude Ranch entertained visitors who came for mountain views and the chance to play cowboy. It closed in 1985 and soon the ranch's cabins and lodge started falling apart once people stopped using them.

That's how White Grass joined a backlog of some twenty-seven thousand historic properties nationwide that the National Park Service couldn’t afford to maintain. But things have changed.

Folk Pop Trio Band Of Lovers On Morning Music

Sep 15, 2016
Band of Lovers

Band Of Lovers recorded live on 9/15/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

Wyoming Public Radio celebrates its fiftieth anniversary Wednesday, September 14th 2016. Station News Director Bob Beck joined Morning Edition Host Caroline Ballard to reflect on his time at the station, the changes that have taken place, and what the future might hold.

A new documentary that premiered in Wyoming on September 9 and 10, tells the stories of three Native Americans from the Wind River Indian Reservation and their quest to find and reclaim tribal artifacts locked away in museums and other storage facilities.

Mat Hames is the director of the new film, What Was Ours, which was commissioned by Wyoming PBS. Hames says the film follows an Eastern Shoshone elder and two Northern Arapaho youths, a journalist and a powwow princess, as they track down artifacts that belonged to Native Americans at the turn of the last century.

SKYGLOW

 

 

A man who fell into a hot spring and died at Yellowstone National Park earlier this summer is being remembered by the producers of a nature video series. 

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