Features

thebeardedladyproject.com

A University of Wyoming scientist has created a documentary to celebrate women in paleontology.

Ellen Currano said she and a friend, filmmaker Lexi Jameison Marsh, conceived of the project after a hard day in their separate fields. Both women had felt like outsiders who were not taken as seriously as their male colleagues.

Richard Cahan

A new book compiles government photos of Japanese-Americans in World War II incarceration camps, including Heart Mountain in Wyoming. For the first time, some of the people in the photos have been interviewed. 

Those interviews are included in Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II. Author Richard Cahan joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Erin Jones to talk about the stories of the photos.

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Adam Duncan Harris is the curator of art and research at the National Museum of Wildlife Art, and is a recipient of one of the 2017 Governor’s Art Awards. He sat down with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about the award and his approach to managing the museum's collection. 

Watch Wyoming's Entries For NPR's 2017 Tiny Desk Contest

Jan 30, 2017
NPR

As you may know, NPR put out another call for undiscovered bands to enter a contest to play a Tiny Desk Concert in Washington, D.C. A number of Wyoming musicians filmed themselves behind—and in front of—their own ‘desks’. Check out all of the entries here

Here are the Cowboy State's contest entries:

Flickr Creative Commons

A bill to incentivize movie production companies to film in Wyoming passed the Wyoming Senate today. 

Senate File 24 will give the Wyoming Tourism Board more flexibility when it comes to reimbursing certain costs of film making to production companies, and investments in those production companies.

Douglas Senator Brian Boner said movie production itself won't bring revenue directly into the state, but it could attract tourism.

Courtesy Wyoming Humanities Council

For the past few years, the Wyoming Humanities Council has put on a series of events called “Ignite” where locals gave short multimedia presentations in a format similar to TED-talks. This year, the council is kicking off another series of presentations in Cheyenne, Casper, and Laramie with a name change and a shift in focus to storytelling. Jason Burge joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about some of these changes.

University of Wyoming Cultural Programs

  

As the University of Wyoming begins another semester, a new line-up of cultural programming at the school is on the horizon. Janelle Fletcher is the director of Fine Arts Outreach and Cultural Programs at the University of Wyoming, and she joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about what Spring 2017 has in store for students and the public.

 

  

On Monday, January 16 at 9 p.m., Wyoming PBS will air a new documentary set in Wyoming called What Was Ours, directed by Mat Hames. It’s about three Native Americans on the Wind River Indian Reservation and their relationship to artifacts and ceremonial objects and how hard it can be to keep such things within the tribe. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards spoke with two people who appear in the film, Northern Arapaho members Jordan Dresser and former Powwow Princess Mikala Sunrhodes.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

William F. Cody, also known as Buffalo Bill, died in Denver, Colorado on January 10, 1917.  One hundred years later, his name adorns a 300,000 square foot museum complex in Cody, Wyoming: The Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

That complex holds a Buffalo Bill Museum, but it also houses a research library and four other Museums, featuring Western Art, Plains Indians, guns, and the wildlife and wild places of the Yellowstone area. What else did the world famous showman leave behind?

Flickr

A new documentary will air on PBS that tells the biographical story of Clara Brown, a former slave who came west and made a fortune. The film Clara: Angel of the Rockies was a winner of PBS’s “To The Contrary: All About Women” film festival in the women’s U.S. history category.

Its creator Patricia McInroy grew up in Wyoming and went to Casper College. She joined Wyoming Public Radio's Caroline Ballard to talk about Clara Brown's life and the upcoming documentary.

Clara: Angel of the Rockies will air on Wyoming PBS Sunday, January 8 at 11 a.m.

Poll Results: Listeners Pick The Best Music Of 2016

Jan 2, 2017
Courtesy of the artists

The Best Music Of 2016

We asked listeners to vote from two lists: AAA and Wyoming albums. We received an abundance of votes this year! Thanks to everyone who voted and thank you for listening to Wyoming Sounds. Here are their picks for the best music of 2016:

Top 20 AAA

Flickr

PBS will air a documentary created by Wyoming native Patricia McInroy. Her film Clara: Angel of the Rockies was the winner of PBS’s “To The Contrary: All About Women” film festival in the women’s U.S. history category.

The documentary tells the story of Clara Brown, a former slave who came to Colorado and set up a laundry business for miners, eventually making a fortune. McInroy said Brown ended up winning over almost everyone she met because of her kindness, earning her the nickname “Angel of the Rockies.”

Brad Watson

UW creative writing professor Brad Watson is out with a new novel that’s been long-listed for this year’s National Book Award.

As he tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Erin Jones, Miss Jane is about a woman living in rural Mississippi in the early 1900s, with a rare congenital disorder that renders her incontinent and unable to reproduce.

Maggie Mullen

Last year, the Arizona Final Salute Foundation asked University of Wyoming student Cassidy Newkirk to paint the sinking of the USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Prints of the painting would help raise money to fly the six remaining survivors of the Arizona to Hawaii to be honored at the 75th anniversary ceremony. But as soon as she began the work, Newkirk said strange things started happening.

When Newkirk was commissioned she said she was given certain guidelines. 

Four recipients of the 2016 Governor’s Arts Awards have been announced. Two recipients are from Jackson: author, art historian, and curator Adam Duncan Harris, and arts advocate Tim Sandlin. Marianne Vinich is a visual artist and art teacher from Lander.

And a posthumous award has been given to Forrest Mars, Jr., the Mars candy bar heir and arts patron from Big Horn who died last July at age 84.

Women Run The West

Over the last year, Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard and Jennifer Pemberton, formerly of Utah Public Radio and currently working for KTOO in Juneau, Alaska, have tracked the political representation of women in western states in the collaboration Women Run The West.

HumaNature Broadcast Special #3

Dec 6, 2016
Meg Thompson

A special edition of HumaNature formatted for air: a man walks from Mexico to the tip of South America with his best friend, a donkey; a man crosses the Atlantic to deliver livestock to post-World War II Europe; and an outdoorsy woman discovers she has more to learn about the wilderness. 

Story 1: Hoofprints On The Heart

This is the story of a love that spans continents. Jon Dunham set out on the longest, toughest walk of his life. But along the way, he met someone who helped carry the weight. 

Neltje

The celebrated Wyoming artist Neltje has led a storied life. Her new memoir, North of Crazy, chronicles her journey from high society to the high plains.

As the daughter of famed publisher Nelson Doubleday, Neltje had a privileged upbringing, growing up in her family’s homes in New York, Long Island, and South Carolina.

But as an adult, she left society life and moved to her adopted home near Sheridan, where she still lives. Neltje spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Americana Duo Sally & George On Wyoming Sounds

Dec 1, 2016
Grady Kirkpatrick

Sally & George on 11/23/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

Studio Session With Baroque Folk Band River Whyless

Nov 28, 2016
Anna Rader

River Whyless studio session, showcasing songs from their new album We All The Light. (recorded August 2016)

A new anthology of Wyoming writers offers a current snapshot of the state’s literary tradition. The book’s release is being celebrated with readings and book signings in six communities around the state.

‘Blood, Water, Wind, and Stone’ features the work of more than 70 poets, fiction, and non-fiction writers. Editor Lori Howe says the title reflects the overall theme that runs through the anthology.

leonrussellrecords.com

  

Musician, writer and producer Leon Russell passed away November 13 at the age of 74. Russell’s wife, Jan Bridges, said in a statement that her husband died in his sleep at their Nashville home. Russell had heart bypass surgery in July and had been planning on resuming touring in January.

Leon Russell talked with Grady Kirkpatrick ahead of his show in Laramie Aug 6, 2013.

 

Robert Kelly

As America contemplates its future with a new president, one man has been looking to the past for cues about our future. Robert Kelly, an archaeologist at the University of Wyoming, has written a new book called The Fifth Beginning.

In it, he argues humanity has encountered four transition points - or “beginnings” - in its history: the invention of technology, like stone tools, culture, agriculture, and the state. He sat down with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to discuss the period of transition humans are facing right now.

Edward S. Curtis

  

It’s been a long time since a large market book has tackled the history of the Indian Wars in the American West. But just last month, a new one hit bookstores, titled The Earth Is Weeping.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards chatted with author Peter Cozzens about why he felt it was time to get people thinking about this tragic era in American history.

Tom McKean With Round The Bend On Morning Music

Nov 4, 2016
Anna Rader

Round The Bend Quartet on 11/02/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

Florida Americana Folk Musician Austin Miller On Morning Music

Nov 1, 2016
Austin Miller

Austin Miller live on 11/01/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

BRANDON BALLENGEE, UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING ART MUSEUM

On November 1, the University of Wyoming Art Museum will host Evening Conversations with Curators.

The event is part of the on-going Earth, Wind and Water program, and will spotlight the museum’s November exhibit Waste Land: A Survey of Works by Brandon Ballengée, 1996-2016. Master Teacher Heather Bender will be one of the hosts for the event, and said she looks forward to discussing such an interested mixed media exhibit.

Edward S. Curtis

A new history of the Indian Wars of the late 19th century hit bookstores on Tuesday. The author set out to debunk myths about the settling of the American West. Historian and author of The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West, Peter Cozzens, said he wrote the book because he saw the need for an objective account of the Indian Wars.

Julianne Couch

According to demographers, small town America is in trouble. Populations are aging and shrinking, as young people leave for the big city. But that’s not the whole picture. In her new book, Julianne Couch draws on her own experience to paint a portrait of nine small towns in Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Wyoming—specifically Centennial.

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