Features

New custom bike racks will be popping up across Downtown Laramie this fall.

In response to complaints about parked bicycles cluttering up the sidewalks – chained to trees, garbage cans, and sign posts – the Laramie Main Street Alliance began polling residents and business owners, and collecting data about bike traffic.

Executive Director Trey Sherwood says this October, the Alliance will install colorful new bike racks in the high-traffic areas of downtown.

Douglas is bracing for the 50,000 people that will flood in from around the region for the Wyoming State Fair, which starts Saturday.  Fair staples, such as the Ranch Rodeo, the arm wrestling championship and the fiddle contest are back.  But there will be new events on the schedule, too.  Dock Dogs is a race for canines through an obstacle course.

StoryCorps

This summer, StoryCorps set up a booth in Cheyenne to record Wyomingites interviewing one another and sharing their stories.

Today, we’ll hear from 95-year old Pinedale native Guy Decker, better known as “Bud”. Decker tells his longtime-friend Jim Latta about what it was like to grow up on the Wyoming Frontier.

Produced by Rebecca Martinez with interviews recorded at StoryCorps, a na­tional nonprofit whose mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives. (storycorps.org.)

Mountain West Voices: “On Walkabout”

Aug 9, 2013

From Mountain West Voices, Clay Scott tells about Laramie’s Paul Taylor. 

Paul Taylor has been on walkabout for most of his adult life. He is an incredibly gifted storyteller and musician, and I met him as he was travelling from Laramie, Wyoming, to a school in Eureka, Montana to hold a week-long story-telling and art workshop.

Gloria Baxter: Professor Emeritus of the University of Memphis School of Dance and Theater, Gloria was invited by The Murie Center of Grand Teton National Park to create an original narrative theater adaptation based on the writings of Olaus and Margaret Murie, pioneers in the American wilderness movement.

Kurt Johnson of Wilson is the author of a new field guide for Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with Johnson about the book. He says that while there were already a lot of field guides for those parks, he felt he could still add something.

Grand Teton National Park announced plans to upgrade its pathway system Tuesday. Slated improvements include lengthening the trail by more than two miles and safety enhancements, including signs, path striping, and the addition of a modern style roundabout.

The project will extend the park’s system of bike paths, part of which runs parallel to highway 89. Several smaller safety features have already been installed, such as path striping and better signage.

The Laramie Mural Project has met its fund raising goal for the next year using the popular online crowd-sourcing website, Kickstarter.

Richard Bernstein is an attorney and triathlete who was born blind. He represents disabled clients pro-bono at his family’s law firm outside Detroit, and is an adjunct professor at Michigan State University.

He’s speaking his weekend at the Chabad Jewish Center of Wyoming in Jackson Hole. Bernstein’s talk, called “Vision is Overrated: A Blind Attorney and Athlete” is part of the Chabad Center’s “Distinguished Lecture Series.” He spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez from his cell phone in Yellowstone National Park.

Although millions of visitors will flock to Yellowstone National Park this summer, Atlantic City-based author and journalist Marjane Ambler is one of the few people who’s lived there when the park is buried in snow.

The former High Country news editor lived with her husband – who drove a snow plow – inside Yellowstone for nine winters during the 1980s and 90s. In her new book, “Yellowstone has Teeth,” Ambler recounts stories of terror and wonder during her time there. She talks with Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez in the studio.

The grazing land of Wyoming is currently filled with young calves out to pasture. Calving season lasts through the spring and early summer in Wyoming and once the calves are born ranchers have to brand them to identify which ranch they belong to. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov attended a branding and found that in the 21st Century, some ranchers are happily keeping up old, social customs during their brandings.

IRINA ZHOROV: Scott Sims’ ranch in the Rock Creek Valley in Southeast Wyoming branded a batch of their calves at the end of June.

prx.org

Writer, musician, and photographer Jessie Veeder reads her essay about visiting a ranch in North Dakota, “There’s Nothing Wilder.”

Laramie Mural Project

The city of Laramie has just received a 25-thousand-dollar grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to help bring more public art to the area.

The grants are designed to improve the quality of life in communities by encouraging creative activities and beautification projects.

Kevin Kallaugher’s (KAL) work for The Sun and The Economist has appeared in more than 100 publications worldwide, including Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Pravda, Krokodil, Daily Yomiuri, The Australian, The International Herald Tribune, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The New Yorker, Time, Newsweek and U.S. News and World Report.

This month, the University of Wyoming will host a field course where students will explore the geographic, historical and religious significance of Heart Mountain in northern Wyoming.

Two educators will split the teaching of the course, one focusing on history, and the other on religion. The latter, Mary Keller, is a historian of religions and a lecturer at U-W. She spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez from the Big Horn Radio Network in Cody about what makes Heart Mountain so special.

Julianne Couch is the author of Traveling the Power Line, a book about the many energy sources we tap into for our power needs – from oil and gas, to wind, to solar and uranium.

Couch teaches at the University of Wyoming and has also written Jukeboxes and Jackalopes: A Wyoming Bar Journey and Waking Up Western: Collected Essays. She now lives in Iowa but stopped by the studio to talk to Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov about her book.

Lenz Collection, Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library Wyoming Room

The Sheridan WYO Rodeo in will host the return of some special guests this year. The Miss Indian America pageant was held during the rodeo from 1953 until 1984 and several past winners will reunite this weekend.

ARCHIVAL TAPE: [Drumming] There’s a town out west where the eye can stretch over the plains from mesa to mountains, where the heart warms in the sunshine of friends and the townspeople can see buffalo from their own backyards. Such a place is Sheridan Wyoming!  

Rebecca Martinez

Rancher and former saddle bronc rider, Tim Kellogg of Meeteetse, began selling homemade chocolates on weekends to bankroll his rodeo passion in 2004. Known by many as the “Meeteetse Chocolatier,” Kellogg now runs a shop on the little town’s main street seven days a week, drawing locals and tourists back again and again for his rich and creative flavor pairings. Rebecca Martinez interviewed him and produced this piece.

Waiting For A Chinook will close out the Snowy Range Summer Theatre season this year. The story follows a reporter from the city who returns to his Western hometown to search for meaning in the writings of his late father.

I spoke to author Gregory Hinton, who, like his hero, returned to Wyoming from California to seek out his own father’s writings in archives of the Cody Enterprise, where G.C. Kip Hinton was an editor. 

Leigh Selting directs the play. Performances will run July 9th to the 13th at the Buchanan Center for Performing Arts Studio Theatre in Laramie, Wyoming.

Photo courtesy of Grand Teton Music Festival

Next week the annual Grand Teton Music Festival gets underway at the Walk Festival Hall in Teton Village.  Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck spoke with Andrew Palmer Todd, the New Executive Director of the event. He says this event has become well known.

Some Wyoming students won awards at the National History Day competition in Maryland.

Laramie’s Hazel Homer-Wambeam and Jackson Higgins won first place for their Junior Group Performance entitled “The Golden Age of Radio: Turning Points in American Culture.

Brianne Beale and Nicole Collins from Jackson received third place for their Senior Group Documentary “The Gray Wolf Reintroduction: A Scientific Approach to Protect the Yellowstone Ecosystem.”

The city of Rock Springs is busy getting ready to host the National High School Finals Rodeo for the second year in a row.

Organizers say this year’s event will include students from 43 states as well as from high schools in Canada and Australia. Chad Banks is the marketing director for the Sweetwater Events Complex.  He says while last year’s event was a big success for the community, there’s still some room for improvement.

LCCC to offer architecture courses

Jun 10, 2013

The Wyoming chapter of the American Institute of Architects is working with Laramie County Community College to make it easier for Wyoming residents to become licensed architects.

The Institute’s president-elect Chet Lockard says UW does not have an accredited architectural design program, and he says that’s a problem.

“Students have to leave the state of Wyoming to complete their architectural education,” Lockard said. “Often times they don’t return.”

Historian Phil Roberts at the University of Wyoming recently published a book called “Cody’s Cave,” which tells the story of a vast set of caverns near Cody. The cave was once a national monument, but was then turned over to local control, and Roberts argues that that was a grave mistake, because the site is now just a hole in the ground, off limits to the public. Roberts joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden to talk about the cave, and its demise.

Photo courtesy Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historic Site

Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck spoke with author and historian Mac Blewer about his entertaining book called “Wyoming’s Outlaw Trail.”  It’s about the outlaws that frequented Wyoming in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.  For instance he says Baggs, Wyoming was a popular hangout.

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The Wyomericana Caravan pulled into Wyoming Public Radio on May 14, 2013 ahead of their kickoff show in Laramie.  J Shogren, Jalan Crossland and Screen Door Porch each played their Wyoming brand of Americana music.  They also talked with Grady Kirkpatrick about the tour.

Sheridan-based historian Val Burgess is passionate about World War II Prisoners of war. Through her non-profit, Wars’ Voices, she and her husband Jerry are working to record and archive the stories of World War II P-O-Ws.

Sheridan author Tom McIntyre has a new book out called “The Snow Leopard’s Tale.” It’s a story that takes place on a high Tibetan plateau and is written from the point of view of a snow leopard named Xue Bao. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden spoke with McIntyre about the book, and he described it as more of a fable than a novel.

Zarif Khan: A Wyoming Life

May 31, 2013

Zarina Khan speaks about Sheridan’s Zarif Kahn on Mountain West Voices.

As a graduate student in UW’s Creative Writing Program, LuLing Osofsky was fascinated by the various ways she saw Indian culture present in Laramie. South Asian students celebrated traditional festivals on campus, and the town had a good place to get curry. She writes about experiencing these pockets of India in her series of vignettes called “Wild Wild East: Finding Hints of Asia in the West.”

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