central wyoming college

Administrators at Central Wyoming College’s culinary and hospitality program in Jackson are considering a new class schedule to allow students to continue working at hotels and resorts during the region’s busy seasons.

Students working towards associates degrees at CWC Jackson currently attend classes on a typical semester schedule. Program Director Amy Madera says the new schedule would be condensed into the tourism off-season—October and November—and April and May.

Dan Hayward

Wyoming’s Red Desert has become an increasingly popular destination for nature photographers. Dan Hayward has been taking pictures of that vast landscape—from the ground and from the air—for three years. On Friday, he’ll present his work in a slide presentation at Central Wyoming College in Riverton. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer spoke with Hayward about his work in the Red Desert.

Jimmy Emerson via Flickr Creative Commons

The Wyoming Department of Education will hold its fifth annual Native American Education Conference this week in Riverton. The goals of the conference including boosting communication between schools and the Native American families they serve—and integrating tribal culture into curriculum.

Last year, the high school graduation rate for Native American students in Wyoming was 42 percent, compared to 78 percent for all students. Conference coordinator Keja Whiteman says that gap signals the need for this event.

Phil Roeder via Flickr Creative Commons

Nationwide, including Wyoming, states are working to build huge databases that can track students from preschool all the way into the workforce. In the brave new world of big data, the thought is—more information means smarter education policy decisions and improved learning. But some parents worry that these systems will go too far.

At Laramie County Community College, a classroom full of people is talking about control groups and independent variables. It’s not as exciting as it sounds, but it is important.

Rebecca Huntington

We've all heard stories about businesses that start in a garage or on the back of a cocktail napkin. But it takes a lot more than a great idea and some elbow grease to build a business from scratch. So a new Jackson program, called the Start-Up Institute, is running a business boot camp for entrepreneurs. Wyoming Public Radio's Rebecca Huntington has more. 

REBECCA HUNTINGTON: This is what you might consider finals for sixteen students completing Jackson's first-ever Start-Up Institute.

KELLIE HOTEMA: I'm too tired to be nervous.

P. Solomon Banda, Associated Press

Sergio Maldonado is a Mexican-Arapaho who grew up on the Wind River Indian Reservation outside of Lander, Wyoming.  He now teaches at Central Wyoming College in Riverton.  In these two stories, Sergio talks about his experience with the Arapaho and Shoshone tribes.  His personal history informs his understanding of Native identity.

Central Wyoming College

The rare and valuable Stewart Collection of clothing, toys, tools, weapons and other artifacts was donated in 1996 to Central Wyoming College by Pat Stewart of Lander and her son, Lynn Stewart, of Dubois.

CWC Peck Arts Center – Riverton

Mar 1, 2013
Central Wyoming College

The Robert A. Peck Arts Center was built in 1983 and is one of the finest visual and performing arts facilities in the region. The facility has several performing spaces, including the 942-seat theater, a music rehearsal hall, and a black box theater/dance studio. The theater is fronted by a 6,000 square foot gallery space which leads into the Art Wing.

Central Wyoming College will be getting over a million dollars from the Department of Labor to launch an innovative program to help young adults who have been in the Juvenile Justice system.

The one-point-two million dollar grant will enable the college to set up the Second Wind Project that will help former juvenile offenders between the ages of 18 and 21 to develop life and work skills with the goal of keeping them out of the criminal justice system.